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This new motor just changed the car industry


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#1 NSwanberg

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Posted 22 November 2022 - 08:07 AM

Pancakes rule?

 


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#2 Eddie Fleming

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Posted 22 November 2022 - 08:37 AM

The most interesting thing I saw was the battery to be used in the 2025 G wagon


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#3 Phil Smith

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Posted 22 November 2022 - 02:13 PM

i'm not sure the motor is all that new: https://www.yasa.com

 

750-yasa.png

 

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#4 Bags

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Posted 22 November 2022 - 05:17 PM

You won’t like it Mr. Smith…….it’s brushless.


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#5 Bill Seitz

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Posted 22 November 2022 - 08:04 PM

I don't think these motors are particularly new, mostly just new to VW Group who now apparently own Yasa. Chinese also have their line of hub motors up to 250 hp that I haven't noticed any manufacturers using. I'd be concerned about the unsprung weight of a hub motor.

 

I'm not against brushless in an application that's designed for it. Unfortunately, we're trying to make a system that was not designed for slot cars work in them. If and when we do get a brushless system designed to work in slot cars as we know them now, or change the system to accommodate brushless technology, then we can determine whether they are cost and performance competitive.

 

There's all this promotion of electric vehicles in the last year or two, but so far I'm not seeing any investment in electricity infrastructure to support them. This is more than just relatively easy to construct charging stations. A rough guess is we're probably tripling electric consumption which is going to require an enormous investment in generating and transmission capacity, and I don't see movement to address that. I guess we're betting on people charging cars at only low usage hours or when additional solar and wind are available. Will be interesting to see how this all works out, but it might be a good time to invest in home auxiliary power.



#6 Dave Crevie

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Posted 23 November 2022 - 09:52 AM

One of the biggest concerns I have in going full electric vehicles is upgrading homes to 220v. services for the fast chargers. There are still a lot of houses with 110v. lines. And you are right, where is all this power going to come from? As I said before, we are putting the cart in front of the horse. We need to upgrade the infrastructure first. But who will pay for that? Not the electric companies, unless they get something really big in return.  


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#7 elvis44102

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Posted 23 November 2022 - 10:20 AM

One of the biggest concerns I have in going full electric vehicles is upgrading homes to 220v. services for the fast chargers. There are still a lot of houses with 110v. lines. And you are right, where is all this power going to come from? As I said before, we are putting the cart in front of the horse. We need to upgrade the infrastructure first. But who will pay for that? Not the electric companies, unless they get something really big in return.  

 

china and india are currently close to making thorium viable, the idea is to make numerous smaller reactors

 

there is a solution to our "energy crisis" within a decade and i am comforted by winston churchils observation "Americans always do the right thing, sooner or later"


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#8 jimht

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Posted 23 November 2022 - 10:59 AM

No problem...especially when there's money to be made.

 

Worriers will worry but an engineer will just say I can make that work.

 

The electrical capacity to charge EVs is already available and will easily be upgraded as necessary.

 

The charging systems are being built by the companies that will produce the EVs...that is the key to Tesla's success and is not going unnoticed.

 

At home charging will be the most common and can be done on 110v. Charging times will shorten rapidly as battery technology improves.

 

Luddites may disagree, but they will always use buttons instead of zippers or Velcro regardless.  :D 


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#9 NSwanberg

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Posted 24 November 2022 - 09:13 AM

Thorium is the GREEN answer. Check out Terrestrial Energy. Southern Company may be ahead of the rest. The first public utility to figure it out will own the others.

 

If we initiated a Manhattan style project to develop liquid fluoride thorium reactors it would cut the legs off of the oil oligarchs.

 

Something else of interest is Japanese red hydrogen. Makes me think we could develop air craft carriers that could make their own jet fuel while at sea.

 


Remember the Steube bar! (ask Raisin)
SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL RACEWAY!!
"The denial of denial is the first sign of denial." Hank, from Corner Gas

"Death before disco!" Wanda from Corner Gas
Nelson Swanberg 5618

Peace be with all of us and good racing for the rest of us.
Have controller. Will travel. Slot Car Heaven


#10 elvis44102

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Posted 24 November 2022 - 10:21 AM

i first learned of thorium about 6-7 yrs ago, and for me it was like a small epiphany, the thorium tech seems to have been resurfaced by kirk sorrenson  who then pushed it on the web, it seems the solid nature of the fuel creates all kinds of issues in present uranium designs, this video shows the helium design built in 1998 i think this might predate the resurgence on thorium's rediscovery...while green energy is always mentioned i never see the other reason mentioned...our medicine and fertilizer come from oil which is more important to me...

both thorium and this helium cooled reactor mention smaller" almost portable design which seems like a good idea as well


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#11 Jay Guard

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Posted 24 November 2022 - 11:55 AM

Here's the real answer.... :D

 

Mr. Fusion.jpg


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