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Replacing stock 4002FK arm with X12 arm


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#26 Jay Guard

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Posted 28 March 2023 - 08:22 PM

You would want to have an Ungar with a 40-50 watt heating element.  The idea is to get the iron really hot, add some acid flux (Lucky Bob's is fine) to the joint, and then get on and off the joint quickly (while adding some solder) in order to not over heat the magnets, 60-40 solder is fine.


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#27 W. J. Dougherty

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Posted 28 March 2023 - 09:57 PM

I always used Wright Way paste flux in the syringe. I laid a fine bead along side and end plate of the can. Put a dab of solder on the iron and touch it to the seams and it will flow smoothly
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#28 studentdriver

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Posted 30 March 2023 - 01:11 PM

You would want to have an Ungar with a 40-50 watt heating element.  The idea is to get the iron really hot, add some acid flux (Lucky Bob's is fine) to the joint, and then get on and off the joint quickly (while adding some solder) in order to not over heat the magnets, 60-40 solder is fine.

 

 

I checked and the ungar I have is 45 watts. I guess this older model can have different heating elements/ends from what I found online, anywhere from 25 watts to 45 watts. 

 

I don't think i'm going to blame my equipment at all in this case, lol.. I just need to learn a bit more.. Also as I'm getting older I've developed my patience a bit more but I'm still quick to get frustrated at certain times.. also tend to rush when I don't need to.

 

Also it seems like maybe cleaning up the flux a bit with a brush cleans up the results too.

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#29 studentdriver

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Posted 30 March 2023 - 01:20 PM

ungar was a good brand, but i prefer the hakko brand. any 60/40 solder is good along with stay-brite acid flux. i also use rosin paste flux for improved flow.

 

thanks for recommendations. I might stick with the ungar I have now but if it breaks I would definitely consider the hakko brand.


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Mike Ciccarelli
 
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#30 studentdriver

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Posted 30 March 2023 - 01:27 PM

In San Antonio and in the South TX Scale Series, we've been running JK Hawk 6's with the Koford 12 and ProSlot X12 arms for years in Flexis, GT chassis and wing car chassis. We even ran Group 19 arms in them in a wing car class that hasn't yet recovered from the pandemic.

 

As someone noted above, yes, make sure the motor and axle bushings/bearings are not worn out. Excess play can strip gears out easily. I ran 72-pitch gears for a while but found the adjustment too fiddly for my patience and skill level and have gone back to 64-pitch with no more issues. I run a straight spur and angled pinion.

 

I like Wink's suggested motor install methods above...if no cigarette papers handy you can use cash register receipt. But best result is with just-noticeable play between the gears.

 

As to the motors, suggest:

  • glue magnets in if/when the holding tabs on the can break off
  • replace plated endbell hardware with copper
  • shunt the brushes; these tend to run very hot without them

Good luck!

 

I did use the receipt method and that seemed to work well! I also did glue in the 1 magnet.

 

Shunts might be something I'll play around with next. Copper hardware seems to get expensive fast. I'm guessing the conductivity of heat and electricity helps that much when switching to copper?

 

If you have some time, can you maybe give me some ideas on what shunting helps with? I've definitely had maybe like 10 motors with shunt wires on them.. I believe all my g27 and open motors have them on (I didn't build any of those, only installed them in the chassis). The actual shunt wire is very short in length so I'm confused on how it can help that much.. I'm not doubting it's helpful, but trying to understand why.

 

thanks!


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- Like going fast!

#31 Bill from NH

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Posted 30 March 2023 - 07:05 PM

Shunts provide a direct electrical path from the buss bar to the motor brush. If something happens to hamper your motor brush contact to the brush hood, such as a poor fit, burrs, dirt & grime, track glue, or oil. you brush still gets track power through the shunt wire. It does not have to have length, I like the shorter the better, but not so short that it hangs up the brush. 


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