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Motor winding/rewinding


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#1 havlicek

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Posted 27 October 2007 - 07:59 AM

One of the things I'd like to try again is winding armatures.

I've done slot cars since the '60s, but really three different times. After the first time, when I was really young, I did it for a couple of years when my oldest son was born and then again now. I only did rewinding when I was really young and have only the faintest recollection of it. There was a nice little rotating clamp thing you simply put in a vise and moved with a crank handle. It used a set screw to tighten a set of jaws on two poles of the arm as you wound the third. Is this or something similar still available?

Also, is there a source for blank arms or do people just take apart unbalanced/unepoxied arms and rewind them? Also, what's a good source for magnet wire? Looking to do some C-can arms and see what's what.
John Havlicek




#2 Hworth08

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Posted 27 October 2007 - 10:13 AM

I believe Rick, here on Slotblog, can provide what I think was a Simco rewinding machine.

Radio Shack sells three spools of magnet wire in a bag. 30, maybe 24, and something bigger? for about $5. eBay has lots of 155 C wire. Don't know where to find the "premium" wire.

Pro Slot might sell you some blank arms? Dan Debella is a member here, a PM to find out?
Don Hollingsworth

#3 Bill from NH

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Posted 27 October 2007 - 11:35 AM

As Don said, Rick B. on here made some winders. Simco published a rewinding instruction sheet, LaGanke made most of the old winders.

For wire, check with Pablo (Paul Wolcott). He's recently wound an arm or two but I'm not sure what he used for wire. He'd be helpful with other questions you might have too. Good luck finding blank arms or quality comms. I don't think any manufacturer wants to sell them today.

If you just want to experiment and play with a couple, use a Chinese 16D arm. The wire comes off pretty easily and they have a decent but not great comm. You could probably shorten up the 16D stack for the C-cans by removing several segments but I've never tried. :)

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#4 Jairus

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Posted 27 October 2007 - 12:09 PM

Blank arms pop up on eBay from time to time and there are usually only a few buyers interested so most times you won't get into a bidding war over them. I have a couple of blanks here and was planning on winding a couple of arms for myself just to say that I did it.

Got my 24 wire from Radio Shack. It has a bright red lacquer coating so the arm will be beautiful when I finally get one done.

Good luck, John! :D

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#5 Mark Wampler

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Posted 27 October 2007 - 12:28 PM

I'd sure like to get some tips, too. I can think of only one successful rewind I did in the '60s It was a 26D with 28 wire. The ones I used to do overheated and burnt up. :laugh2:

The other thing that's real important is timing of the comm. There are tools out there to measure degree settings. Hopefully some more experts will chime in here.
You can quote me.

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#6 havlicek

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Posted 27 October 2007 - 01:47 PM

Thanks for all the (as usual!) really helpful information all. There was a small (whatever the smallest size was) Mabuchi motor... whoever used the bright yellow color... that I used to buy just to rewind for F1 cars that used to scream. Of course I don't have a clue what gauge wire, # of turns or com timing it was... but it shouldn't be too hard to work up something with a little screwing around.

Back then, you could just buy arms and even commutators at any track as well if you didn't need the can, endbell, and magnets. The good thing is that, once you get going and have a formula... winding armatures is not very difficult... MUCH easier than scratchbuilding some of the beautiful chassis I see around here. Heck, if I could do it as a kid... how hard could it be ? :D Anyway, I only remember that my buddies and I were using some pretty hefty gauge wire (maybe 25???) and by those standards they ran like heck, although we were blowing commutators like crazy for a while before the "blowproof" comms came out.

Looking around the Mura website, the cheapest arm I could find for tearing apart is like $20... so that isn't going to work on a carpenter's paycheck. The PCH site has a "Mura Challenger Armature - M2200" that goes for $9... still a little steep but better (if that's a good quality arm???). I was hoping to get a dozen and wind up with maybe three or four keepers at the end.

Jairus, I'm not sure what the coating was on wire... and don't know if lacquer will hold up under heat. I know that you can get magnet wire with all kinds of different coatings on it, but magnet wire is used for all kinds of things besides armatures and maybe the lacquer will work. #24 awg sounds about right though.

I'll try and contact the folks mentioned here and see if I can come up with stuff. Here's a crude picture of what the "winder" looked like and after I started using it, the jobs came out much better and the results were more predictable. I think probably somebody with a machine shop just made them and bagged them for sale at the tracks.

rewinding_crank.jpg
John Havlicek

#7 rdmac

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Posted 27 October 2007 - 02:19 PM

... I think probably somebody with a machine shop just made them and bagged them for sale at the tracks.

John, the armature winder was made by LaGanke.

LagankeArmWinder.jpg
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#8 havlicek

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Posted 27 October 2007 - 02:48 PM

Yikes!... that's it (or the same exact design). Can those still be had?
John Havlicek

#9 jlsinz

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Posted 27 October 2007 - 03:05 PM

Try these guys for wire.
Small spools and high temp, every size you could want.
John Sinz

#10 Mark Wampler

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Posted 27 October 2007 - 03:08 PM

Thanks for posting that pic, Bob. I never had access to one of those. Notice the small spool of 27 wire. As I remember, anything bigger than 28 wire required aftermarket strong magnets like Mura white dots and so on, otherwise you wouldn't have brakes.
You can quote me.

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#11 Mark Wampler

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Posted 27 October 2007 - 03:14 PM

Larry Shepherd is really good in rewinding those old five-pole Pitmans. He used wire with "polythermalese" coating. No bigger that 30 ga. Another thing to remember is that the PS pup and FK motors only use 30 wire. I'd try 29 or 28 using standard magnets.
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#12 Larry LS

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Posted 27 October 2007 - 04:20 PM

Haven't done much re-winding lately. Did a lot in the '60s til you need to have them professionally balanced on a precision balancer. The old razor blades didn't do it anymore when you got into the big hot winds.

I do wind a motor now and then for my 1/32 scale stuff that is not into the need of honking motor power.

Here is what Rick had shown as his rewinder he was going to make.

I of course told him his needed a digital counter built in, which he said he thought about but did not get many takers for re-winders, I think.

Posted Image
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#13 Rick

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Posted 27 October 2007 - 08:15 PM

I made some of these, sans the digital counter Larry installed in the pic, LOL. I can make another. Digital counter is also doable but a PITA. :shok: ...

PS: I will look around, I had dozens of old 12 and 15 arms that could be dewound and rewound, if I could only remember where they are today. I let a bunch go to Rocky so he could play a couple of years ago.
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#14 MarcusPHagen

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Posted 28 October 2007 - 08:12 AM

Rick, did that winder have a ratchet so it wouldn't wind backward? I don't mind not having a counter, because I measure the wire. But I do need some method of keeping it from unwinding under tension. PM me if you've still got one for sale.
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#15 havlicek

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Posted 28 October 2007 - 09:04 AM

Rick...

I would be real interested in one of those and knowing what they would cost. I realise that "one-off" machine work can be expensive. If you are thinking about doing them, PM me or just post publicly. The ratchet thing would be cool as well but I don't really "need" that feature.
John Havlicek

#16 Don Weaver

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Posted 28 October 2007 - 09:47 AM

For magnet wire try a local motor repair/rewind shop. They will have any wire size you want and for no more wire than you will need they will probably just give it to you since they buy it in 100 lb. buckets.

Class F wire is standard but you can find Class H wire which is 155c if I remember right.

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#17 Prof. Fate

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Posted 28 October 2007 - 11:04 AM

Hi,

My first wind was in '60, taking a 3 volt arm out of a government servo and rewinding for a car on 12v!

And I didn't use a fixture more complicated than a small bench vise.

The rachet to stop it from going back isn't the issue. One of the advantages you have as a human rather than being the "six million dollar winder' is you can FEEL.

With practice you will feel that the wire varies constantly and slightly in diameter, and strength. So you can get a better tighter coil by constantly adjusting the tension based in the feel of how the wire stretches.

Which explains why once it was a feature that increased the price of the arm if it was "hand-wound".

I gleefully bought those arms from Rich for a stupid cheap price, that he keeps mentioning, for this reason. Parts is parts! In 1/32 we commonly built SHORTER motors. I think some of you have seen a couple of my shortened "P" cans, one of which was one of my "cheater motors". Modern arms are to a size, but in the day some of us built motors to size to fit the needs.

It ain't "rocket science", it is just fun. Don't over think the process, and don't wait around for advice. GO BLOW STUFF UP!

Fate
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#18 Pablo

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Posted 28 October 2007 - 11:47 AM

John,

It ain't braggin if you can back it up....

I have done them by hand, works fine if you don't get arthritis... I have an R-Geo (Rick B.) winding tool, works super.

- Don't sweat the exact degrees of timing, just advance until the comm post is even with the next leading edge of the lams.
That's "hi timing", in the ballpark. You need strong mags and tight (15 to 20 thou) airgap for this much advance. Weak mags, bigger airgap, use less advance. Apply the correct amount of spacers to align the arm and comm in the motor, then super glue the comm and spacers in the desired positions before winding.

- I used the best two-part, clear, store-bought epoxy I could find. Baked it in the oven, rotated it and inverted it occasionally.

- I have a winding instruction guide and can send it via email if you like.

- In general, more turns of thinner wire=more torque and brakes, less horsepower, more longevity, cooler running.
Less turns of thicker wire=more horsepower, less brakes, less longevity, more heat.
Also, less turns=less weight (duh).

- Standard Parma Super 16D arm would be my recommendation to use, as it will fit some vintage applications...

- I have blank, wire, and comms if you want. Just let me know in a PM.

- I used dental floss to secure the windings around the comm before epoxying.

- Make sure the shaft is straight before you waste lots of time on an arm that will never run right! Lots of blanks on eBay are not straight, long-ago rejected. Once again, I think my axle and shaft straightness dial checker is an RGeo tool.

- Most important, send it off to a pro arm balancer for a balance and a comm true. What a thrill when you run it and it howls like a dental drill on steroids. :D

Posted Image
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#19 havlicek

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Posted 28 October 2007 - 12:16 PM

Now that's some good info, Pablo... Thanks! I learned one thing right off the bat, the little tip about epoxying the arm BEFORE winding to prevent shorts. That's one thing I never did, but I can recall specifically worrying about all those sharp edges! On the comm timing:

-Don't sweat the exact degrees of timing, just advance until the comm post is even with the next leading edge of the lams.

... that's the kind of "precision" I DO remember :-) and while there was a lot of variability in my results, the "keepers" were worth the hassles.

-Standard Parma Super 16D arm would be my recommendation to use, as it will fit some vintage applications...

... have some extra C-can setups so for now, I'll stick with those for my little experiments.

-Most important, send it off to a pro arm balancer for a balance and a comm true.

... that is one thing I WILL do once I settle on a formula. For now, two razor blades in clay or wax will do fine for getting an idea how they run. If I can get an arm winder, I'll do that too because I had the experience years ago of seeing an improvement because of the tool. It won't stop me from messing with this anyway. I sure appreciate the great info, Pablo!
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#20 Larry LS

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Posted 28 October 2007 - 12:30 PM

Over the years I wound many arms and not once did I use a winder to hold the arm.

My left hand and fingers always did a great job of holding the armature still or moving as needed to get the feel of the wire being wound around a segment. I tried a winder once and I instantly realized I had lost the total feel of the wire and arm as a whole. I had also lost the sense of feeling if I was winding it too hard and stretching the wire or being too loose in the wind. I measured my wire lengths to start with. But kept counting winds to compare segments as to count and see if one or another was pulled too tight or too loose with same length of wire.

I did make a nail and spindle tube on the edge of the bench so I could have the wire spool spin easily as I need the wire to advance for the winding. Worked great to keep that spool captive but free to rotate as needed. I measured the wire length on the spool with a small piece of tape and then wound it back on the spool loose so it would not get tangled up before being wound onto the arm. Then I would mark the next one, etc., etc., etc. I only wound one seven-pole arm and that was enough for me.

It is always a fun thing to do something for yourself and seeing it run, sometimes great and sometimes just so-so or smoke.

But that is JMHO. YMMV. :D
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#21 Bill from NH

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Posted 28 October 2007 - 03:50 PM

John, you must have a pin vise. It'll hold the arm while you wind, too. :wave:

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#22 havlicek

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Posted 28 October 2007 - 04:08 PM

10-4 on the pin vise... as a kid I stole... er... borrowed everything my dad had in his workshop to do this stuff and yes... I wound many simply with two hands. Still, I got the neatest result by using the winder. I also made sure I was using the same number or turns per layer and the same "design" on each pole rather than the same length. I figured that I'd be close enough that way to the same length of wire per pole :D I smoked a bunch, but also got some really nice motors out of the whole deal.
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#23 Hworth08

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Posted 28 October 2007 - 05:38 PM

If I was winding a hot arm I would send it to one of the people that work arms for a living to be epoxied and tied. They use a vaccum chamber that sucks the epoxy down into the windings and they use Kevlar to tie the comm.

Let them balance the arm and true the comm, then run the new arm through a few heat cycles. After being heated and "spun" the wires will shift a bit, enough that the arm will at least need to be checked for balance again. Re-cut the comm and the arm should be ready to run till the comm needs cutting again.

Ron Hershman can probably perform this service.
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#24 Pablo

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Posted 28 October 2007 - 05:40 PM

OK John, just give me the word if you want some wire and a comm, I'll hook you up, no strings attached. Lots of folks here helped me, and I'll do the same.

You can find arm balancers on eBay also, I have one. Uses magnets. I had very good results with it. If you taper the ends of the shaft to a perfect taper, it works super.
Paul Wolcott

#25 Rick

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Posted 28 October 2007 - 06:58 PM

OK gentlemen, a few arm winders it is. I am asumming you are going to wind .510-.520" arm diameters?

I also made and sold the arm balancers with the magnets a while ago on eBay. I can make a few of those up, too. Send a PM if you want one or either.

Thanks...
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#26 havlicek

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Posted 28 October 2007 - 08:21 PM

Much appreciated, Pablo... I think I'll be OK for both of those but it sure is nice of you to offer!

Rick... 10-4 on the arm diameter and I've never seen the magnetic balancer thing so I have no idea what that is. PM sent.
John Havlicek

#27 Rick

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Posted 28 October 2007 - 10:58 PM

Posted Image

And it does MUCH better if you grind one end of the shaft to a point. Almost zero friction...
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#28 slotbaker

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Posted 29 October 2007 - 12:10 AM

Neat. :)

Does it make any difference to the accuracy of the balance if the ground point is not perfectly on the centreline of the shaft, i.e. how accurate does the point have to be?
:unsure:

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#29 stevefzr

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Posted 29 October 2007 - 01:25 AM

Rick, did that winder have a ratchet so it wouldn't wind backward? I don't mind not having a counter, because I measure the wire. But I do need some method of keeping it from unwinding under tension. PM me if you've still got one for sale.

Marcus, this unit isn't pretty, but it does have a reversable ratchet and a counter:

Posted Image

I pulled apart an old fishing reel for the winder and ratchet assembly. I need the ratchet so I can keep the tension on with one hand while I use the end of a matchstick to push the winds down tightly between layers. The arm clamp is a converted curtain rod holder! It'll have to do until some LaGanke clamps turn up one day. No one who's seen it so far have believed it's serious, but trust me, it is! In fact, using this and a pair of geezer goggles I can get better winds than I did as a teen in the late '60s.

Regards,
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#30 MarcusPHagen

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Posted 29 October 2007 - 12:48 PM

I believe it!

My problem when winding was always that I'd have the windings loosen when I took my hand off the crank to tape the loose end, prior to winding the next pole.

I'd like to try winding some 26D and 36D arms (I've picked up a few on eBay, as Jairus says, there are only a few of us looking for them, so the prices aren't too bad yet). In addition, I'm intrigued by Larry's Pittman five-pole winds. So this is more for personal education than anything else. However, if they turn out OK, I'll do some more.

In the mean time, though, I'll be looking for something which will allow me to change holders for different sizes. It looks as though both yours and Rick's would allow that. I've also been thinking of a way to put a ratchet on Rick's by silver-soldering a gear to the rotor shaft, with a piece of spring steel to keep it from unwinding. As you say, the counter is rough, but it looks like a workable system for hobby use.

Thanks for posting that picture.
Marcus P. Hagen -- see below, my five favorite quotes: applicable to slot cars & life in general.
[ "Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.". . Daniel Patrick Moynihan ]
[ "Time is the best teacher. Unfortunately, it kills all its students.". . . . . . . . Hector Berlioz ]
[ "There is a very fine line between 'hobby' and 'mental illness." . . . . . . . . . . . Dave Barry ]
[ "Build what you like to build, they are all doomed." . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prof. Fate ]
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#31 Pablo

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Posted 29 October 2007 - 03:22 PM

My problem when winding was always that I'd have the windings loosen when I took my hand off the crank to tape the loose end, prior to winding the next pole.

A drop of krazy glue and the wire stays put for a time out or before attaching to the comm. I actually secure each pole's wind with the krazy glue, then cut and label it, A1, A2, etc. Then I solder to the comm after all poles are wound. :wacko:
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#32 havlicek

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Posted 29 October 2007 - 04:04 PM

Well, I just got word from Mura that they'll sell blank arms and comms, and am just waiting for them to tell me the price. Getting the magnet wire is easy so it looks like I'll be experimenting away.

I love the smell of burning armatures in the morning, smells like victory :D
John Havlicek

#33 MarcusPHagen

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Posted 29 October 2007 - 04:44 PM

A drop of krazy glue and the wire stays put for a time out or before attaching to the comm. I actually secure each pole's wind with the krazy glue, then cut and label it, A1, A2, etc. Then I solder to the comm after all poles are wound. :wacko:

That sounds like a good technique, and I'll have to try it. As far as I can remember, when I was last rewinding Velcro was brand new (they had somebody on Johnny Carson using Velcro-soled shoes to walk on the ceiling) and I remember reading about this new super glue that was supposed to hold a ton with one drop... but they didn't have it in stores, yet. Pretty sure that the glues we use now were developed for surgery, and tested in Viet Nam. I digress.

I'll have to try that, especially now that we may have a source of armature blanks from Mura. Great work, Havlicek!
Marcus P. Hagen -- see below, my five favorite quotes: applicable to slot cars & life in general.
[ "Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.". . Daniel Patrick Moynihan ]
[ "Time is the best teacher. Unfortunately, it kills all its students.". . . . . . . . Hector Berlioz ]
[ "There is a very fine line between 'hobby' and 'mental illness." . . . . . . . . . . . Dave Barry ]
[ "Build what you like to build, they are all doomed." . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prof. Fate ]
[ "The less rules the more fun. Run what you brung." . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Larry LS ]

#34 havlicek

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Posted 29 October 2007 - 05:28 PM

.. Shucks, Marcus...'tweren't nuthin'. :-) Actually, since they have commutators listed on their site, it seemd as though they shouldn't mind selling some arms to go with them. I still don't know what they want for them... but how much could it be?
John Havlicek

#35 Bill from NH

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Posted 29 October 2007 - 07:31 PM

I knew Mura was sold a while back when the then current owner got sick but didn't realize they were still in business. I haven't seen a Mura part in the local raceways here for more than three years. :shok:

Bill Fernald

 

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#36 havlicek

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Posted 29 October 2007 - 07:35 PM

They're not set up for internet commerce so you have to prepay, but you can buy direct from them.
John Havlicek

#37 stevefzr

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Posted 29 October 2007 - 08:01 PM

A drop of krazy glue and the wire stays put for a time out or before attaching to the comm....

My technique is a little different from you guys, which is why I need the ratchet. For starters, I wind with the comm on and already timed! I start by soldering the wire to one of the comm tabs and then wind the first layer on a pole. When the layer is finished I use the end of a match to push the winds closer together, and no matter how tight and cearefully I wound that first layer, I always manage to get a couple more turns on. The ratchet allows me to keep the wire tight with one hand while I compact the turns with the other.

Once I've got all the turns on the layer, I push it down in the middle using the match end again to make sure they're sitting tight against the stack. I stop every layer and push the turns down tight onto the layer below in this same way. When I finish one pole I work out where the wire will cross the comm tab for the start of the next pole, scrape the insulation off at that point and then hook it back over the tab and keep winding. It means that my whole arm is wound with a single length of wire and only one tab has ends soldered to it. The other two tabs have continuous loops passing over them that are also soldered. It means that the wire is very tight, including at the comm, so even without epoxy and binding thread it's unlikely to throw, although I always epoxy and tie them anyway. Because the wire is so tight, you can only adjust the timing 1 degree or so after you've wound the arm, so it's important to get it right before you start winding.

As for different size arms, the curtain rod ends attach with a 1/4 Whitworth thread, so I swap to different size curtain rod holders for 36D, 26D, 16D, etc. I plan to modifiy this one day with proper arm holders and the like, but only to make it prettier. From a functionality point of view it already does everything I need from a winder.

Regards,
Stephen Corneille

#38 slotbaker

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Posted 29 October 2007 - 08:41 PM

Steve C,

Do you balance your own, or send them out?

If you send them out, to where? In Oz or O/S?

Ta.

:)

Steve King


#39 Ron Hershman

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Posted 29 October 2007 - 11:14 PM

If I was winding a hot arm I would send it to one of the people that work arms for a living to be epoxied and tied. They use a vaccum chamber that sucks the epoxy down into the windings and they use Kevlar to tie the comm.

Let them balance the arm and true the comm, then run the new arm through a few heat cycles. After being heated and "spun" the wires will shift a bit, enough that the arm will at least need to be checked for balance again. Re-cut the comm and the arm should be ready to run till the comm needs cutting again.

Ron Hershman can probably perform this service.

We do all of this... vacuum the hi-temp epoxy, spin off the excess, tie with Kevlar, and bake correctly using hi -emp epoxy for the application. We have done many hand-wound arms for other posters on this blog.

We also do dynamic balancing work daily. Razor blades, etc, is static balancing and is not that accurate or good.

We also have 100s of Slotworks 16D .600" length stack and Super 16D .500" stack length arms (.520" or so diameter ) we sell 10 for $5 that can be de-wound easily, comms reused, and you can even take plates of the stack length and make to any length you want.

Mura info here: Mura Motors

#40 havlicek

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Posted 30 October 2007 - 05:35 AM

Thanks for posting that info, Ron. This thread has pretty much all the info for the subject wrapped-up neatly... and now a cheap source for 16D arms as well. I'll probably be looking to use your services at some point.
John Havlicek

#41 stevefzr

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Posted 30 October 2007 - 10:13 PM

Do you balance your own, or send them out?

If you send them out, to where? In Oz or O/S?

Unfortunately there's no one in AUS who does dynamic balancing. I know I could get them to the States and back in two weeks, but I'm not that patient. I do a static balance using the razor blades technique with a Dremel cutting disc to remove excess metal. I mostly wind for vintage kit cars (like Tamiya and Cox) running natural rubber. When I get around to building vintage scratch racers for a glue track, where I can use a lot more power, I'll send some arms away for the proper balancing.

Regards,
Stephen Corneille

#42 mdiv

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Posted 31 October 2007 - 08:53 PM

I just wanted to poke my head in and say this is a very cool topic!

Onward, gentlemen!

Mike DiVuolo

 

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#43 havlicek

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Posted 01 November 2007 - 05:35 AM

I agree! Winding/rewinding arms was one of the things I enjoyed the most when I first ran slot cars. Having a car with my own chassis running my own wind under a body I (very poorly) painted was a kick.

I should have all the pieces assembled to dive in to this within a week or so and I'm starting out with what should be (if they don't explode) some pretty hot stuff. I got a couple of the Mura C-can blanks coming but they are really expensive (like $10 for the arm and another few bucks for the comm) and Ron here is sending me a bunch of D can arms as well. Too bad blank arms aren't an off-the-shelf item any more.
John Havlicek

#44 Uncle Fred

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Posted 01 November 2007 - 12:37 PM

I'm coming into this topic a little late.....like 40 yrs! But I used to love winding armatures back then and experimenting with with various turns and gauges.

In the beginning it was the only way to go fast. I NEVER used any sort of winding device. It was always freehand. I held the arm in one hand and slowly, carefully wound with the other keeping even tension on the wire. After a while I would use a 1/8 inch axle (!) to press the windings down between the poles. I would scrape the coating (Formvar?), attach it to the comm tab, and proceed to the next pole.

I advanced comms, removed and added plates to the stack, even angled the stacks in a vise like the early Globe motors were. Tried it all.
Fred Correnti

#45 gascarnut

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Posted 01 November 2007 - 01:37 PM

When I was still in high school and did not have much money (what's changed?) I used to take cheap Mabuchi 16D armatures, carefully unwind all the wire, then double it up and wind it back on as a double wind using half the number of turns of the original. Some epoxy to hold the wire, balance on two razor blades and into a motor.

I found out about blown commutators this way... :D

So then I would strap the top of the comm with thread. They only lasted a little longer then, but they were fast while they ran.

Dennis Samson
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Life is scratchbuilt

Samson Classics


#46 havlicek

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Posted 05 November 2007 - 06:25 PM

I found out about blown commutators this way...

... been there, done that. :shok:

Well, I got my magnet wire and am just waiting on the arms to get here before I revisit all this. Hopefully will get that winder as well. I also got a Parma D-can setup to use for testing out some of arms Ron is sending, never messed with one before. Can anyone tell me what's up with the weird springs on these things?
John Havlicek

#47 Rick

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Posted 06 November 2007 - 07:23 PM

Winder is done and going out tomorrow. :) Have fun...
Rick Bennardo
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#48 havlicek

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Posted 06 November 2007 - 08:33 PM

... Bingo! Much appreciated Rick... you've got mail.
John Havlicek

#49 Rick

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Posted 06 November 2007 - 09:14 PM

I made six. If anyone else wants one, PM me...
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#50 havlicek

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Posted 07 November 2007 - 06:22 AM

... I'm really looking forward to winding my first handgrenade... er... armature. I'll try and get some pics up before it explodes. :-)
John Havlicek





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