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#26 gascarnut

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Posted 29 November 2007 - 03:19 PM

I built this car for a friend in England:

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He installed one of the South Pole magnets in it, and it apparently runs way better than it did stock.

He sent me a magnet but I have not yet installed it in anything.

So all I have to go on is the reports from the UK on how much better the car was.

Sorry!

Dennis Samson
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#27 TSR

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Posted 29 November 2007 - 03:37 PM

Dennis,

Cool Super Squalo with Atlas motor and Mike Hawthorn at the wheel?

A few years back, I was first confronted by such an arrangement in an Atlas Brabham BT7 where a gent had fitted one of those "cobalt" mags. The thing was not that fast but on plastic track the mag traction was intense and he won running away...

I believe that the windings on the Atlas AT208 motor are a bit on the weak side and the arm could stand a fatter gauge... :D

#28 gascarnut

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Posted 29 November 2007 - 03:42 PM

The best part about fitting these magnets is getting some brakes!

I have an Atlas in a scratched-up frame under a Du-Bro Daytona Coupe, with two Ninco magnets each side on the pole pieces - it's the only way that old thing will stop!

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Dennis Samson
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#29 TSR

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Posted 29 November 2007 - 03:43 PM

:laugh2:
Must be "disk" brakes...

#30 don.siegel

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Posted 29 November 2007 - 07:18 PM

These Atlas motors are already fairly fast as they come - and they have lots of natural magnetraction. It seems some of these are a bit fragile, but ones I've used have held up very well and had decent brakes.

I don't believe an AT406 could compete with a 26D under any circumstances - it's just too big and heavy, although great for old Indy roadsters! The little AT206 version is probably faster in any case, except maybe on a very long straight.

Don

#31 Prof. Fate

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Posted 30 November 2007 - 01:33 PM

Hi,

My personal choice is to not use modern magnets in these vintage motors and cars. Makes them not vintage. Zap the magnets, sure. Or use "poor man zapping" by stacking Neos in the right place for a week to recharge them, sure.

We have better, modern, cheaper motors and can build better modern chassis, no point in my mind having a half-azzed vintage car.

R
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#32 BWA

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Posted 30 November 2007 - 02:34 PM

... with two Ninco magnets each side on the pole pieces - it's the only way that old thing will stop!

With those 3:1 bevels, it would have no brakes for sure.

Those motors need gearing around 5:1 or better.
Al Penrose BWA (Batchelor Without Arts, Eh!)

#33 John Secchi

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Posted 30 November 2007 - 04:33 PM

Have tried the South Pole magnet in various open frame motors, worked well in the MRRC 3- and 5-pole units but these motors benefitted with the fitting of double pole plates, however when I fitted it to a good Atlas 206/Rikobomb I found the car drove better with the original magnet! I do have the advantage of being able to re-zap my motors so the advantage seen by others might be down to magnetic loss of the original magnets.
[oneofwos]

#34 Robert Livingston

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 10:53 AM

In preparation for a Proxy series which would allow old single-magnet, open frame motors, and current-day motors, I was concerned that the older motors might have an unfair advantage due to magnetic downforce. I found that a steel plate under the magnet cuts the magnetic downforce. Using a Magnet Marshal, I measured 51 grams downforce from a Pittman DC-70 (original magnet), but with a .026" thick plate stuck underneath, only 26 grams measured (51%). The plate is slightly bigger than the magnet, at 1" x 1.25". I think it is a piece trimmed off some ductwork; galvanized, easy to find.

#35 Prof. Fate

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 02:23 PM

Hi,

Robert, you are also reshaping the magnetic field on the motor, killing the field effect and shape on the arm and risking damage to the arm from heat.

Fate
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#36 Robert Livingston

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 05:17 PM

I wanted to test that out, so I ran 35 laps with the plate, and then 35 laps without it, on the 61' wood track (copper tape). The performance of the motor increased without the plate, and lap times dropped from 5.53 to around 5.47, on average. I could not tell any difference in the temperature of the windings using the famous touch-your-upper-lip-to-the-armature method. I suspect the temp might have risen about as much as the lap times, which would be one percent.

The idea for reshaping the field away from the rails came from the European slot motor makers, who sell one motor with an open slot in the case for magnetic effect, and one with a solid case, for no magnetic effect, but otherwise identical performance.

#37 Prof. Fate

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Posted 03 December 2007 - 12:30 PM

Hi,

Bob, you need to retest with steel rails. The forgotten point about magnetic fields is that they are limitless, and the rails/contacts become part of the field. Trying to isolate one field from another when designing it is a trap we all fall into.

I have used steel plates on cars in magnet races to shape a better driving field on the rail, which is why I am bringing this up. Often I try to "rat out" things I have gotten away with in the past.

Fate
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#38 idare2bdul

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Posted 03 December 2007 - 01:41 PM

What type of track you run on is very important. My car, set up for Carrera Track, would not even move on Scaley track.

Is the track secured to a table? Foamy had track suck up into the bottom of his car at a track in Santa Monica where they didn't have the track screwed to a board. He might have been slightly aggressive with his choice of magnets.
The light at the end of the tunnel is almost always a train.
Mike Boemker

#39 Robert Livingston

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Posted 03 December 2007 - 04:28 PM

Oh, steel rails! Rats. I'll have to wire up the forgotten Revell skid pad.

Thanks for the tip.

#40 Prof. Fate

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Posted 04 December 2007 - 12:29 PM

Hi,

Mike, that is why I talk about the rail. Carrera rail is stainless steel, meaning given a gap, only about 45% the attraction of the plain steel of the raised Scaley rail, or the flush Revell rail.

Fate
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#41 rail racer

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Posted 24 January 2008 - 04:37 AM

I built this car for a friend in England:

Posted Image

Posted Image

He installed one of the South Pole magnets in it, and it apparently runs way better than it did stock.

He sent me a magnet but I have not yet installed it in anything.

So all I have to go on is the reports from the UK on how much better the car was.

Sorry!


Friend here!
This Ferrari performed really well, leading the pin car final at the 2006 Pendle Slot Car Convention, before it finished the race in third place.

Jeff.
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#42 idare2bdul

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Posted 24 January 2008 - 02:34 PM

I stopped by a friends place yesterday and he is in the process of creating a modified Pittman 65 with a neo magnet and a very creative armature. This will join 2 previous frankenmotor vintage projects that were highly successful.

This actually reminds me of today's 1-1 vintage racing. Many of the cars have been vastly improved over what they were back in the day. Purists cringe but the guys that own them get a heck of a ride! :)
The light at the end of the tunnel is almost always a train.
Mike Boemker

#43 bres3000

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Posted 13 March 2008 - 06:11 PM

...at least four different cars have been built with two motors... and this Pittman piece gives me some ideas for another two-motor car! :D


I'm thinkin' about building a 4WD car with two Pittman DC 706 motors. (I'm gonna need bigger tires..)

Posted Image
I've saved you the trouble, Nappy.
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#44 Steve Speedway

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 03:15 AM

Hello. I'm an Altas motor fan. I have read about the AT-406 and I have a few of them, remagnetized, ready to go into 1/32 slot car chassis and a couple of 1/24.

However, Im have having trouble with giving one motor a tune-up. 

I bought an Atlas tune-up kit off ebay.  Each spring allows the carbon brush to fit inside, but the springs are too wide to fit inside the brass retaining screws.

 

Wanting to know why, I pulled down another one of my Atlas motors, which has thinner brushes.

Can I drill out the brass retaining screw so that it will accept the spring?

Otherwise, where can I find a pair of new replacement (thinner) motor brushes?

 

If anyone can tell me the names of each Atlas motor I would appreciate it. 

I'm curious to know why Altas changed the brush size width? The motors sure looks the same.

 

One more question, if I may. I have an armature with green wire. What is the difference between that and those with plain brass wire?

 

  Thank you. 

Steve, from Brisbane, Australia   (4 pictures attached)

Attached Images

  • AtlasChassis3224.JPG
  • AtlasBrush1a.jpg
  • AtlasBrushesSM.jpg

Steve Magro





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