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You're crazy to think about doing that!


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#1 Cheater

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Posted 17 October 2014 - 04:17 AM

Why would a sane person elect to drive a newly-purchased 1930 Ford Model A Tudor sedan from Oregon back to Atlanta?

Numerous reasons, actually.

Driving an antique car essentially across country has been an entry on my bucket list for quite some time. And at age 60, it's time to start checking off some of the items on the list.

I've never been in the Pacific Northwest and it's fall color season soon.

I have the time and the ability right now to make such a trip, as does my older son (age 34) who will be accompanying me in a modern "chase" car.

Ford Model As are simple, reliable vehicles with an almost unparalleled parts availabilty. There are very few breakdowns that we won't be able to repair en route if necessary. Plus I have a close friend whose business is transporting collector cars all over the US and he's been alerted that he might possibly receive a call to come drag the car home.

The trip will provide opportunities to meet people I have known for years but have never met in person.

Call it an "Animal House" style road trip, only in a much classier car and through much more impressive scenery.

Those who have wondered about my sanity in the past should now have had all doubt removed... LOL!
  • endbelldrive, Arne Saknussem and Michael Rigsby like this

Gregory Wells

Never forget that first place goes to the racer with the MOST laps, not the racer with the FASTEST lap





#2 Cheater

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Posted 17 October 2014 - 04:41 AM

Two weeks ago, I had no thoughts of making a trip like this.

I've been hankering for a good, reliable, driver-quality Ford Model A for a quite a few years and recently achieved the wherewithal to purchase one. For several years I've been networking friends in the collector car hobby looking for a car like this but couldn't find a vehicle locally that fit either my parameters or my budget for purchasing it.

A couple of weeks ago I was alerted to a 1930 Model A Standard Tudor that really caught my eye. It was restored over 40 years ago and since that time has been a part of just two collections, with the last owner having held it for over 20 years. It was also notable in having one of the straightest, most "cherry" bodies on a Model A that I've seen in decades. Here's some pictures of the car.

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The fact that the car was restored so many years ago is more significant than many may realize.

Its restoration occurred before the Model A reproduction parts industry reached its stride and in all honesty, many of the repro parts for these cars do not match the original parts for quality and appearance. It is believed that virtually every part of this car is genuine.

Further, a lot of the Model As one finds these days were restored from cars initially in very poor condition, or assembled from unrelated parts, whereas 40 years ago nice, unmolested, largely original cars were much more widely available and typically were used as the starting points for restorations. The body gaps and panel seams on this Tudor suggest strongly that this was a very original, solid car prior to restoration, an opinion shared by the seller's agent, who currently has six Models As of his own and has owned dozens of As over the years.

Of course, the fact that the vehicle was located 2,700 miles from me was a concern, but the history of this car indicates that it is a reliable, great-running Model A that has seen minimal but consistent use for a long time.

That the price negotiated was well below what I could have purchased a similar car closer to Georgia pushed me over the edge. Looking at what it would cost to have it transported back to Atlanta from Oregon led to my deciding to tick off that bucket list entry at the same time.

I've assembled a small stock of the spares one might possibly need on such a journey in a Model A (ignition parts, hoses, fan belt, tire tubes, lubes for topping up, a manifold gasket, etc.) as well as tools (including a couple of special Model A tools) and the terrific and comprehensive modern Model A repair manual by Les Andrews. We expect to be able to repair almost any breakdown that we experience, except perhaps a major engine problem like a broken rod or a burned main bearing.

We'll be spending most of a day servicing and inspecting the car before heading out.

Any on-the-road repairs needed will just be part of the adventure, though a trouble-free run would be most welcome indeed.


  • endbelldrive, Arne Saknussem, triggerman and 2 others like this

Gregory Wells

Never forget that first place goes to the racer with the MOST laps, not the racer with the FASTEST lap






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