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Trevor Taylor's '63 Belgian GP Lotus R3 - Part Two


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#1 beardogracing

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Posted 10 January 2015 - 02:40 PM

PART ONE

Lotus 25 R-3 has to been the mount for more drivers than any other Lotus 25 built. It has been driven by Jim Clark, Jack Brabham (photo below at the 1963 Monaco G.P.) Mike Spence, Pedro Rodriguez, Trevor Taylor (photo's below) Chris Amon, and Mike Hailwood.


Brabham_1963_Monaco_01_revised_zps444ba5  jimandtrevorcrude_zps1a06074a.jpg?t=1420

lotus25atbelgiangp_zps7745d947.jpg?t=142  lotus25fromcolingettingnasty_zps97fdd866

 

The subject of this build is Lotus 25, driven by Trevor Taylor at the 1963 Belgian GP. I found very few photos of the car in the race, the ones I did find were the size of postage stamps. I did however find the four great photos above. All from 1963, the first photo is Jack Brabham driving R-3 at the 1963 Monaco GP, unfortunately he retired on lap 77. The next three photos are at the Belgian GP; they show show Trevor misbehaving, Colin getting mad at him, and a close-up of the engine cowl.

The base for this build is Mel Ault's new Pre-Wing body of the 1962 Lotus 25 R-2 as driven by Jim Clark at the British GP.

The subject of this build will be Trevor Taylor's R-3 as driven at the 1963 Belgian Grand Prix.


R-2atbritishGP_zpsb70f30ae.jpg?t=1420750

If you compare the above photograph of number 20, to the photo's at the beginning of the thread you can see, due to the updates Lotus made, the rear engine cowl has a few extra holes punched into it to accommodate a revised exhaust system, fuel injection and the relocation of the transistor ignition box.

The Lotus 25 body as received from Mel, it also came with white metal exhaust, and rear view mirrors.

melslotus25_zps19daf791.jpg?t=1420750619


I did the usual things to the shell, all the holes were opened up, and the new apertures were positioned on the shell to replicate R-3 in 1963. The bottom edge of the body was also rework to accommodate the new Beardog MK3 chassis.

chassis2_zpsa21b1748.jpg?t=1420751086

Next, chassis preparation. One of these days I'll have to do a tutorial on assembling a Beardog Chassis. It's tough though juggling a soldering iron, acid flux, and a camera all at the same time.

This time instead of my usual Mashima motor, I decided to use the venerable 030 Mabuchi, why? because that's what most people will be using. As with all Lotus 25/33s space is very tight, and Mel had this body constructed to the correct dimensions, so it's small. Because of the tight confines under the engine cowl, I decided to mount the exhaust and motor details to the chassis via a 'L' shaped bracket that is attached to the motor mount plate. To this the exhausts are mounted via piano wire extensions (the white metal exhausts were drilled out to accept the piano wire). Eight small diameter rods were mounted vertically on to a plastic plate for the bootlace ferrule injectors, and partial cylinder heads, and coolant pipes were fabricated and also added to the plate. This detail can be seen through the cowl aperture.


IMG_20140814_140505_zpsb8d3539c.jpg?t=14

The body roughly mounted to the chassis! I like to get this done at this stage in the construction, and adjusted as early as possible. In this photo you can also see the start of the rear shock absorber assemblies. These are easy to install on the Mk 3 chassis because of the small hole at the end of the chassis a-arms. The cockpit surround is fabricated with a tab either side for windshield retention held in place by the rear view mirrors.
The wheels are the last of my stock of BWA's with BWA inserts, painted Lotus yellow.

2aafb86b58bc87f327f673e9d6dfc6faimage221


This is how a Beardog chassis comes. 
You can just see the holes at the end of the a-arms, a fine piece of piano wire can be threaded from the protruding triangular attachment points on the sides of the chassis, to the holes in the a-arms, and up at a 30 degree angle. 
Attach the shock to this angled extension of the wire, using aluminium tubes, and your favorite Bic lighter spring.

chassis1_zps6384d0a5.jpg?t=1420754180

In this photograph you can clearly see, the installed shock absorbers, injection trumpets, drive gear, and exhausts. The dummy engine details have yet to be painted, and the little details like cam cover decals and exhaust bluing will be done at a later date, when the weather gets a lot warmer.
     
IMG_20140816_140316_zps59b22ba2.jpg?t=14

Windshield fitting time! I know nearly everybody leaves this step to last, why?... because the hate it, that's why I do mine now. Trim out the windshield bottom edge first until it fits the contour of the surround exactly. Fit it in place and hold it there with small pieces of clear tape. Using a very fine drill and a pin-vise drill a small hole (the size of a pin) through the clear windshield, and into the tab on the previously installed screen surround. Insert a pin. Do the same thing to the other side. Shorten the pin to about 1/4" long, mount the rear view mirrors onto the end of the pin. Now cut out the top of the winshield, and you're done... well that's the way I do it any way.

Note the installation of the transistor box, made up from layers of plasticard cut to size after gluing, and the roll bar made from the usual paperclip. Now I "site the car", I get out all the photographs that I can find, and mercilessly compare the car to the photos, I tweak until I think it's as good as it's going to get, then leave alone. 

IMG_20140816_141849_zpsfa0ac06c.jpg?t=14

At this stage I also insert the upper radius rods for the rear suspension, these are made up of thin piano wire, inserted in stainless steel tubing from RB Motion. One end fits in the body, the other in a small hole provided in the chassis rear upright. What's missing? The dummy transmission, not my favorite thing to construct, pictures are up next.

chassis3_zpsb540dd0c.jpg?t=1420757629

IMG_20140819_191300_zps8c92caf8.jpg?t=14

Shots of both sides of the transmission. My version of a ZF box, made from scraps in my old plastic kit box. I shape it around the gear as much as I can, so that it gets hidden. The gear selector and rod  has been fabricated, but will not be installed until the gear box has been painted black, with dull silver highlights to simulate exterior wear. You can see how tight everything is, there's not much room in there for a gear, so I used the last of my Sonic/Beardog gears, but one of the great gears from Steve at Ranch Designs would fit, too.

IMG_20140821_133347_zpsef558519.jpg?t=14

Paint! The part where everybody holds their breath. I first make sure the primer is flawless. I use Tamiya Fine White every time. If you heat the can you can get several coats on sanding between coats without excessive build-up. Then I wash and scrub with a soft tooth brush, and let air dry in a sealed box overnight. Next mount the body to a handle, like an old fine paintbrush handle inserted in the body mount screw hole. Heat the can of top-coat in very warm water in this case Tamiya Racing Green. Hold breath, I give it two light mist coats, followed by three heavy wet coats (30 minutes between coats of paint). Then put away in a dust-free environment. After three days, take out and breath again. If I find hichies I sand out with a Squadron Polishing stick, then polish the whole body with Tamiya polishing compound, then wash well with warm soapy water. Now I'm ready for Indycals New Lotus 25/33 decals.

More to come.


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#2 Russell Sheldon

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Posted 11 January 2015 - 06:57 AM

Absolutely fantastic workmanship, Chris.

 

Kind regards,

 

Russell


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#3 Tex

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Posted 11 January 2015 - 09:23 AM

Lookin' good!


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#4 beardogracing

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Posted 11 January 2015 - 11:29 AM

PART TWO

Trevor Taylor's R-3 as driven at the 1963 Belgian Grand Prix.

overhead1_zpsc74ac36e.jpg?t=1420821180

OK the paint is dry, so I just had to put all the parts in place to see how it looked. From this overhead shot you can see that even with the 030 motor the cockpit is a little cramped. On to the next step... the decals, or transfers as they say in the U.K.

body1_zps90b5cade.jpg?t=1420821480

Luckily Michael at Indycals came out with decals for every Lotus 25/33 that Jim Clark drove up until 1965. So no more having to scrounge or rely on Patto's. I've been using Michael's decals wherever possible since my first Beardog Racing product: the McLaren M-16 Indy-car. They work great if you are going to apply a clear top coat over the decals (which I always do). Tamiya Clear Gloss, works great in this application and lays over the decals without any reaction, as you can see from the photo above.

 

As with the paint heat the can in hot water, apply two mist coats, then three heavy coats leaving 30 minutes between each application. It sounds like a lot of paint and gloss top coat, but each layer of paint or clear coat is very thin, and there is hardly any loss of detail. (one of the reasons I recommend heating the aerosol can, it thins the paint out). Again I do not touch the body for three days, after which I polish the body with Tamiya polishing compound.

IMG_20140916_141425_zps791c8801.jpg?t=14

Now it all starts coming together. Once more I assemble the car, If everything looks like it should it's time to install the driver. I realize things are a little out of sequence. The driver was fitted to the car before the paint and top coat were applied. But now is the time to paint him, and make Trevor Taylor... Mr Yellow magically appear in the cockpit.

driver1_zps20f1e628.jpg?t=1420823146

Well here he is three times larger than life ready to go into his Lotus. When I work on objects that are as small as Mr. Taylor, or a gearbox I always wear a magnifier, I always wondered how people did close up work like this with 60 year old eyes. Mr Max Winter of Maximodels fame told me... wear a magnifier, hey I can see again! I'm OK at painting figures, not the greatest but adequate, I learn't working at a company called Rose Miniatures one summer while in college. My sister worked as a figure painter for Mr. Russell Gammage at Rose Miniatures. She was fantastic at it, being the preferred artist for Mr. Christopher Lee's collection. Above is my humble attempt, complete with the correct overall badges.

lotus1_zps7f4dca94.jpg?t=1420824319

lotus2_zps6ef0b86e.jpg?t=1420824419

Lotus25newcamera_zpscde9952e.jpg?t=14208

Now we're on the home stretch, this is as far as I got before the winter set in. (I work in an unheated garage). I still need to detail the body, some dark grey needs to be added to the edge of the aperture openings, the gearbox needs to be black, ditto with the transistor box, and I need to detail out the dummy motor... oh yes, and add the to radius arms to the rear suspension. Oh and Trevor's steering wheel and dash board need to be red! Oh and the wonky exhausts will be fixed at final assembly, (they're not glued yet).

More later.


Chris Wright

 

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#5 Eddie Fleming

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Posted 11 January 2015 - 11:48 AM

It is going to be an outstanding car.

 

Beautiful work.


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#6 dc-65x

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Posted 11 January 2015 - 12:00 PM

Beautiful, Chris.  :good:

 

That picture of the Trevor Taylor car with the different color wheels, the blank roundels, separate numbers on the sides, and blue-helmet without visor is cool... different. I feel a 1/24 scale version in my future thanks to your inspirational build.

 

Onward!  :)


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There's much more to come...


#7 beardogracing

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Posted 11 January 2015 - 01:11 PM

Hi Rick,

 

Thanks for the complement.

 

The car you are referring to is Jim Clark's 1962 British Grand Prix winning Lotus 24 R-2, that's the car that the resin shell was originally made to replicate.

 

#20 was a very famous car, it was Jim's second GP win in the famous Lotus 25. The first being at Belgium.

 

Clark-Chapm_62_england_1_rg.jpg

 

Chris


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#8 dc-65x

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Posted 11 January 2015 - 01:49 PM

OK, thanks, Chris. That's Clark in the car. Do you think that #20 car had the rear bodywork over the transaxle or was it open like the car you modeled?

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Check out Steve Okeefe's great web site at its new home here at Slotblog:
The Independent Scratchbuilder
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#9 beardogracing

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Posted 11 January 2015 - 02:19 PM

Hi Rick,
 
It was open, they took the tail cone off after I believe the Monaco GP, here's a photo essay on Jim Clarks cars:
 
Jim Clark's Lotus 25 and 33s by the numbers
 
Chris

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nRW8qQsEZkLUgHSN2Kp6.jpg

 

 






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