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Pittman DC-705, Ram DC-222, and Strombecker Devastator


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#1 McAllister

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Posted 30 January 2015 - 07:18 PM

I bought these motors separately about 10 years ago. I eventually realized that they all had basically the same design.

 

I think the Pittman DC-705 came first, then the RAM DC-222, followed by the Strombecker Devastator (which was made in Japan).

 

DSC_0420_Pittman DC-705_RAM DC-222_Strombecker_Devastator.jpg

Pittman DC-705, RAM DC-222 & Strombecker Devastator "front"

 

DSC_0406_Pittman DC-705_RAM DC-222_Strombecker_Devastator.jpg

Pittman DC-705, RAM DC-222 & Strombecker Devastator "back"

 

The Pittman is the best of these (IMHO) in terms of quality workmanship and engineering. It runs strong and smooth without the axle gear, but with the gear, they all sound pretty much the same.

 

Here's a Pittman DC-705 with the gear (forgot I even had it):

 

DSC_9789_Pittman DC-705 12V w-box cropped half.jpg

 Pittman DC-705 12V with box

 

I ended up buying a lot of six Devastators at a good price. Before I knew what their proper names were, I called them "clones." :wink2:

 

DSC_0435_Strombecker Devastator (six - front).jpg

Strombecker Devastators "front"

 

DSC_0433_Strombecker Devastator (six - back).jpg

Strombecker Devastators "back"

 

Next came the RAM DC-706, which was one of my favorites, because it had a kind of "stealth" look to it...

 

DSC_9776 Pittman DC 706_croppedx2 half.jpg

 

DSC_9771 Pittman DC 706 cropped.jpg

Pittman DC-706 12V

 

I also like the modular design and the brass plates on the side (correct me if I'm using the wrong jargon).

 

Then came the laminated motors, and after them, I guess the can motors took over. It's amazing to think of how many of our household appliances, printers, scanners, CD players, etc. have these little motors in them (many of which are made by Mabuchi). Before I recycle them, I always take out the electric motors and stash them in my "motor" box.

 

I've always loved the smell of ozone. I smell it when these little motors are running. Maybe that's why I like running them so much. Smells like lightning! I wonder what effect it has on a body? :smoking:

 

Some of the pictures I'm posting are somewhat gratuitous. But I like to think I'm doing it for posterity. When I look up these old motors online, most often I will see links to Slotblog.

 

 

Jim Slater




#2 Lone Wolf

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Posted 30 January 2015 - 08:04 PM

Jim, I agree, Pittmans were the gold standard of quality back then. 

 

Cool feature on the 706 is that the axle brackets can be flipped to position the axle behind the motor.

 

Thing about these old motors is that with a little drop of oil they still run fantastic after 50 years of sitting.

 

Another testament to the general quality of things built back then. Don't know if anyone will be saying how well a little electric motor from today was made 50 years from now, but who knows.


Joe Lupo


#3 don.siegel

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Posted 31 January 2015 - 06:08 AM

Yep, that whole family of PIttmans with the integrated axle was also probably a bit factor in the early popularity of slot racing, before the kits started coming out. The hard part was taken care of for you (aligning motor and gears), and you just had to add a simple chassis - which was one of the first commercial items available in the US, by a bunch of manufacturers. 

 

Here's a group portrait of this type of motor: 

 

Motor-SWaxle.jpg

 

The granddaddy was the Pittman DC703, the one at the top with the long shafts, a train motor of course. That was adapted by early 60s racers for slot cars, so Pittman came out with the DC704, often advertised as the first purpose built motor for slot cars, along with their inline DC196 (with axle bracket). 

 

Ram was the first to clone them, with the DC426 and 426A, with axle in the middle, like the 704, then at the front, like the 705. Ram also did the little DC283 for 1/32 cars, and the DC222 you show, which wasn't integral, but came with two brackets to mount the axle and with a changeable gear ratio. They finished with the XL500, a "high performance" version with a 3 pole arm and heavy windings, shown in their ads at something like 80,000 rpm - right! 

 

True that the Pittmans are extremely well built and work fine 50 years later, but in fact a lot of the Mabuchi and similar motors I have also work fine all these years later, as long as they weren't over-rewound in the first place! 

 

Don 


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#4 dc-65x

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Posted 31 January 2015 - 11:00 AM

Cool thread Jim. :good:

 

Here's the hottest of all these motors, the RAM XL500, rebuilt and "hopped up":

 

Ram XL500...Going...Going...Man, it's GONE!

 

I did a motor "hop up" on a 705/706 in this thread tearing the motor apart:

 

Bruce McLaren’s Cooper-Oldsmobile


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Rick Thigpen
Check out Steve Okeefe's great web site at its new home here at Slotblog:
The Independent Scratchbuilder
There's much more to come...


#5 McAllister

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Posted 01 February 2015 - 02:43 PM

The granddaddy was the Pittman DC703, the one at the top with the long shafts, a train motor of course. That was adapted by early 60s racers for slot cars, so Pittman came out with the DC704, often advertised as the first purpose built motor for slot cars, along with their inline DC196 (with axle bracket). 

 

Ram was the first to clone them, with the DC426 and 426A, with axle in the middle, like the 704, then at the front, like the 705. Ram also did the little DC283 for 1/32 cars, and the DC222 you show, which wasn't integral, but came with two brackets to mount the axle and with a changeable gear ratio. They finished with the XL500, a "high performance" version with a 3 pole arm and heavy windings, shown in their ads at something like 80,000 rpm - right! 

 

True that the Pittmans are extremely well built and work fine 50 years later, but in fact a lot of the Mabuchi and similar motors I have also work fine all these years later, as long as they weren't over-rewound in the first place! 

 

Don 

 

Very nice lineup Don, thanks. Yes, I must admit that my old Mabuchi motors still run very well. Something about a "motor in a can" maybe that the old-timers and purists don't like. I'll post more about these later. One of the problems with the Pittman / RAM / Strombecker motors with the external springs and brushes was that they were very easily dislodged.

 

I dug up a Pittman DC-196A and compared it to another similar motor which I can't identify. Maybe you'll know what it is:

 

DSC_9918 Pittman DC-65A & Strombecker.jpg

Pittman DC-65A & Strombecker?

 

DSC_9916_Pittman DC-65A & Strombecker.jpg

Pittman DC-65A & Strombecker?

 

Nice to know the names of these motors after such a long time!


Jim Slater

#6 McAllister

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Posted 01 February 2015 - 02:54 PM

Cool thread Jim. :good:

 

Here's the hottest of all these motors, the RAM XL500, rebuilt and "hopped up":

 

Ram XL500...Going...Going...Man, it's GONE!

 

I did a motor "hop up" on a 705/706 in this thread tearing the motor apart:

 

Bruce McLaren’s Cooper-Oldsmobile

 

Beautiful work Rick, and great macro photography!

 

Too bad the Photobucket images by Don Siegel in the http://slotblog.net/...ngman-its-gone/link are missing. I post all my pics from my hard drive.

 

I'm trying to photo-document ALL my old motors and cars. Needless to say, my workbench is a mess!

 

Did you ever find a home for these fine specimens and get them up and running?

 

Cheers, Jim.


Jim Slater

#7 don.siegel

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Posted 01 February 2015 - 03:40 PM

Hi Jim, 

 

That's the Atlas AT206, a 6volt version of their AT208 which powered their 1/32 cars and their 1/24 Formula 1 cars - in fact, this is now the motor of choice in vintage racing here in Europe! They're fast, slim and even have a bit of natural magnetraction effect when mounted low enough! Also, lots of them available, since Auto World bought up the Atlas stocks and sold them for years afterwards... 

 

Sorry about the photos - they're still on my Photobucket account, but after first putting everything in a single file, I finally reorganized them by category about 5 years ago, and unfortunately, that erases them from the forums.... don't have access, otherwise I'd put them back in where they belong! 

 

Dno 


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#8 dc-65x

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Posted 01 February 2015 - 08:46 PM

 

 

.............Did you ever find a home for these fine specimens and get them up and running?

 

 

 

Hi Jim,

 

The Pittman 705/706 is a good runner just waiting for paint.........sigh...........painting is my nemesis.

 

The RAM motor absolutely screams on the power supply. I'm thinking of putting it in something old, low and wide. Perhaps a Revell Lotus 30.

 

Thanks to you and Don for showing all these cool old motors!


Rick Thigpen
Check out Steve Okeefe's great web site at its new home here at Slotblog:
The Independent Scratchbuilder
There's much more to come...


#9 McAllister

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Posted 04 February 2015 - 12:52 PM

Hi Jim, 

 

That's the Atlas AT206, a 6volt version of their AT208 which powered their 1/32 cars and their 1/24 Formula 1 cars - in fact, this is now the motor of choice in vintage racing here in Europe! They're fast, slim and even have a bit of natural magnetraction effect when mounted low enough! Also, lots of them available, since Auto World bought up the Atlas stocks and sold them for years afterwards... 

 

Sorry about the photos - they're still on my Photobucket account, but after first putting everything in a single file, I finally reorganized them by category about 5 years ago, and unfortunately, that erases them from the forums.... don't have access, otherwise I'd put them back in where they belong! 

 

Dno 

 

Thanks Don, I took a closer looks at the Atlas AT-206, and it actually does have ball bearings on the armature and shaft - something I never noticed before. Good spotting!

 

I just saw one on eBay that went for $20.00. Pricey little motors! But not bad considering it went for $6.98 back in 1966. I just tested it and it is quite the little screamer.

 

Found this spec sheet at http://www.theindepe...tlas Motors.htm

 

Atlas AT-206 & AT-208 specs.jpg

 

The article notes that this motor was soon rendered obsolete by the "can motor tsunami." Interesting choice of words...

 

Jim.


Jim Slater

#10 Steve Speedway

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 06:42 AM

Hello. I'm an Altas motor fan. I have read about the AT-208 and AT-406 and I have a few of them, remagnetized, ready to go into 1/32 slot car chassis and a couple of 1/24.

However, Im have having trouble with giving one motor a tune-up. 

I bought an Atlas tune-up kit off ebay.  Each spring allows the carbon brush to fit inside, but the springs are too wide to fit inside the brass retaining screws.

 

Wanting to know why, I pulled down another one of my Atlas motors, which has thinner brushes.

Can I drill out the brass retaining screw so that it will accept the spring?

Otherwise, where can I find a pair of new replacement (thinner) motor brushes?

 

If anyone can tell me the names of each Atlas motor I would appreciate it. 

I'm curious to know why Altas changed the brush size width? The motors sure looks the same.

 

One more question, if I may. I have an Pittman armature with green wire. What is the difference between that and those with plain brass wire?

 

  Thank you. 

Steve, from Brisbane, Australia   (3 pictures attached)

Attached Images

  • AtlasBrush1a.jpg
  • AtlasBrushesSM.jpg
  • AtlasBrushSpring.jpg

Steve Magro

#11 don.siegel

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 07:05 AM

Steve,

 

I answered you in the other thread you posted in: it might be better sticking to one thread, and maybe starting a new thread for Atlas motors. Also, try doing a search here: lots of info already available.

 

The wire colors seen pretty clear for the Atlas, but not sure about Pittman's scheme - will have to look=

 

Don


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#12 bluecars

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Posted 12 November 2017 - 07:55 AM

When I first started racing and after I found out that my Rat Fink cigar car wasn't going to hack it I started with the P 705, followed quickly by the P706 (deffinatly the smoothest of all) ended up with the Ram 222-7 pole. Once I found the sweet spot of gearing it won me a lot of races for about 2 yrs.  


Robert "Red" Valantine :diablo: 






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