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Just a Retro question


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#1 Eddie Fleming

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 06:43 PM

Let me ramble in my thoughts for a minute if you will.

 

It seems to me Retro racing is super popular in a few places and non-existent in many places.

 

Retro cars are cool.

They look like cars.

They have wheels (4) that roll.

They are quick enough and fun to drive.

The chassis and bodies relate back to the cars many of us remember from the 60s.

 

Retro is a class for old school builders, or is it.

A lot of people are racing chassis built by other people.

They can buy a competitive chassis without the time and effort developing and building.

That’s fine, fun for all, and a buck or two for some builders.

Retro cars are not expensive if you build the chassis.

If you buy the chassis they are not so cheap.

If you build the chassis they are not that easy.

 

People have told me they don’t do Retro because it is too expensive in time or money.

 

So bottom line is this question

Is there a place in Retro racing for a mass produced chassis that fits the existing configuration?

It could still be inline.

It could be stamped steel or plastic (anything come to mind) or brass if it meets the rules.

It could be an additional recognized class or just an allowed chassis type in the classes.

It could be a new class with more modern scale bodies?

It could be an alternative for people racing currently popular less scale stuff.

 

 

Just rambling. 


Eddie Fleming




#2 slotbaker

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 06:58 PM

The main attraction for me was the scratch building of similar chassis styles of the 60's.

 

I wouldn't think that Retro is expensive if you build and prepair your own cars.

It would be expensive if you bought RTR cars from an established builder.

Check book racing is not what it is all about.

 

There might be room for another class of car, and I wouldn't think a mass produced stamped/moulded chassis would be in keeping with the spirit of Retro and the original intent.

 

Just my 2 bob's worth.


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#3 Mark Wampler

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 07:17 PM

The term Retro can be confusing.  Retro in slot cars have to do with what was most popular back in the mid to late 60's of Pro racing.  Ready to run Kit cars by manufacterers such as Cox, Classic, Russkit  were not part of the Pro scene.  So yes, it is a scratchbuilders class.  Early scratchbuilding  were inline motor configuration only until mid / late 1968.  Retro slot cars of the day mirrored actual CanAm and Formula one race cars.  Thingies were not part of the Pro race scene of the time.  Wing cars  / air contolled bodies were not part of the 60's.

 

There are a number of retro chasiss kits that can be assembled with some basic soldering skills.  It depends on your interest in assembly and fabrication.  There are a number of seasoned builders who can build to order.   Far as I know there are no mass produced chassis because there is always the drive to produce a better mouse trap.  I believe there used to be a JK spec class, but I don't know if its still active or not.

 

Many times you can score on used setups for a good price.  That would be a better way to get into retro on the cheap. Put out a request to buy a used chassis or complete roller car. 

 

=M=


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#4 Eddie Fleming

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 07:24 PM

I don't need to buy a chassis. I can build.


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#5 Duffy

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 07:42 PM

Actually the chassis (plural) isn't the greatest expenditure. You spend as much or more dressing it out. And then there's your controller. Slot box. pliers Allen keys snips clips fluids worklamp Hudy powerpak...oh yah, a soldeing iron and Dremel in case you need to repair something, and then it's just a skip & jump and a jig to building your own chassis, and you're saving that money and investing it elsewhere.

 

Listen, it's an expensive hobby if you don't want to commit the money to it, just like anything in life costs too much when you don't like the cost; but we also know people who will toss remarkably large sums without a second thought at tobacco, booze, dining out, your choice of entertainment, whatever. It's a choice. The money wouldn't be the reason for not participating, if you want to participate.


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#6 MSwiss

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 07:43 PM

Eddie,
I don't think what you describe will bring more people into the raceway.

Just shuffle around the existing product among the limited amount of people who want to slot race.
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#7 Eddie Fleming

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 07:54 PM

Thanks Mike 


Eddie Fleming

#8 MSwiss

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 08:16 PM

Eddie,
I was busy, here at the raceway, but what I meant to add is most of my customers don't care what the body looks like.

When you explain which one handles better, they will take that.

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#9 Eddie Fleming

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 08:41 PM

Thanks again Mike.

 

Thinking about your first post you are very close to what I had in mind even if I had not put it into words.

 

I was a slot racer in the 60s so the retro cars are an attraction to me. I hate the look of the GTP and lexan stock cars, but I race them. The problem is we have little to no retro in Atlanta, and I would love to find a way to move people to racing something that looks more like  a car than a door stop. even a door stop without the molded in wings is much better than the current GTP crap.

 

the 3D printed chassis is very interesting because it lets people race without building from scratch. yet it in many ways is much like a retro car, and could / should be used with more scale bodies.


Eddie Fleming

#10 John Streisguth

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 08:56 PM

How about 4-1/2" FCR chassis with Retro stock car bodies?  It was a class in the first year of the National FCR series, we ran them at my local track before it shut down, and I know Port Jeff (wing car central...) runs them as well and the guys have a blast with them.

 

JK has some old-style stock car bodies that fit onto 4-1/2 flexi type chassis if that what you would prefer.

 

And JK also has Camaro, Mustang, and Javelin (AMX?) bodies that fit on 4" flexi chassis, so there are some options.


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#11 Half Fast

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 09:13 PM

The 4-1/2" FCR chassis with Retro stock car bodies and retro hawk motors are a blast. They are cheap, easy to maintain  and fast or faster than retro stock cars because of the wider track width.

 

Cheers


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#12 Eddie Fleming

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 09:14 PM

Building or finding cars that I like is no problem. Getting more people in my area to race them is what I am getting at i guess.


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#13 Tex

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 11:25 PM

If you want a mass-produced chassis for "retro" racing, put a Can-Am body on a flexi chassis and be done with it. It'll look retro but that's all. If you want retro, the chassis needs to be scratchbuilt... just my opinion.


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#14 NSwanberg

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 02:02 AM

Listen, it's an expensive hobby if you don't want to commit the money to it, just like anything in life costs too much when you don't like the cost; but we also know people who will toss remarkably large sums without a second thought at tobacco, booze, dining out, your choice of entertainment, whatever. It's a choice. The money wouldn't be the reason for not participating, if you want to participate.

Speed costs money. How fast do you want to go?


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#15 John Streisguth

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 07:10 AM

Building or finding cars that I like is no problem. Getting more people in my area to race them is what I am getting at i guess.

Well, that's aways the problem.  Just suggesting something usualy is fruitless, you probably have to build one and get it on the track and let people see it and try it. 


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#16 Pappy

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 07:23 AM

Actually, to get something going you have to build 5 of them and lend them out so people can see they're fun to race. When I started the Ohio Valley Retro Series there were times when 5 of the 8 cars in the race were my cars. 


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Jim "Danger" Dunaway aka Butch
 
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#17 Matt Sheldon

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 07:27 AM

When I look through the race reports, regardless of region, the "checkbook" racers are 90%+ of the field. Before we get too condescending let's be careful as to how some perceive what retro should be. Without the checkbook racers, there would be no retro racing as we know it today! 

 

What some are describing to be a hindrance, is actually a benefit for me. While I am sure that with enough time and effort spent I could come up with a competitive chassis, the fact that I have a choice and the options to purchase a chassis is what helps the appeal of retro for me. So while yes it may be a little tougher in some areas to get a mass retro program going, the real truth is that it is easy for that new racer to get started because technically they can purchase everything they need to get started and then if they choose, progress into assembling and then scratch building their own chassis. Most the time the hardcore scratch builder and racer winner are not the same person. 


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#18 Pappy

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 07:30 AM

 I would love to find a way to move people to racing something that looks more like  a car than a door stop.

That's one of the reason's I now race 1/32 scale plastic cars, they look like real cars. 

 

I've thought about taking a Carrera 1/24th scale body and building a retro chassis for it just to see how well it runs. I think it would be a great class but then again trying to get people on board so you could have a race would be a nightmare. And I don't have the money to build 5 of them.


Jim "Danger" Dunaway aka Butch
 
Danger is my middle name, that's why I race slot cars.

 

Anything is possible IF you don't know what you are talking about.
 
"In the beginning of a change, the PATRIOT is a scarce man, and brave and hated
and scorned. When his cause succeeds, the timid join him, for then it cost
nothing to be a PATRIOT." - Mark Twain, 1904

 

 


#19 Pablo

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 08:36 AM

IRRA already tried that - it was call Flexi GT, designed to attract newbies into retro.

It was discontinued because the same experts as always were winning the races.

Correct me if I'm wrong. 


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#20 Bill from NH

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 09:15 AM

Pappy, did you give up your Classic Retro Rules class? You ought to build yourself the Carrera car you mention above & see how it runs on your own track. If you did, it might give you the opportunity to apply some of the Classic rules. You never can tell, but it might catch on.


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#21 Hworth08

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 09:18 AM

Buying frames built by the "pros" was popular in the '60s. The period magazines had monthly ads from some of the top racers. There are people that just don't care a hoot about building a frame but enjoy racing.

 

Buying built frames carried over even to Flexi racing though the frames are referred to as blue printed.

 

80 to a 100 dollars for a frame that usually has soon record of performance and requires an hour or two for assembly isn't expensive.


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#22 Pappy

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 10:08 AM

Pappy, did you give up your Classic Retro Rules class? You ought to build yourself the Carrera car you mention above & see how it runs on your own track. If you did, it might give you the opportunity to apply some of the Classic rules. You never can tell, but it might catch on.

Bill,

 

I did Classic Retro because of the crap that was going on in the IRRA at the time. There's not enough people in the area that are interested in Retro in general to get a new series going, especially now that things have calmed down in the IRRA. But now that you mention it, it might be a class we could do locally since I do know a lot of guys who race the Carrera digital cars and have the bodies. 

 

As I have mentioned before, there are a number of reason's I quit racing IRRA Retro. The traveling, the cost, some of the people, a lot of the cars were just plain crappy looking, just to mention a few. When I first started the Ohio Valley Series you could go to the race, spend an hour or so working on your car, buy a $15 Falcon 7, be competitive and maybe even win the race. Now to win you have to have multiple motors, bodies and tires . Test, Test, Test for hours. Not worth it to me. I'd much rather just go to someone's house where you don't have to pay for track time or a race fee, drink a few beers, maybe lend out a car or borrow one and have a great time. But that's just me, all part of getting old I guess.


Jim "Danger" Dunaway aka Butch
 
Danger is my middle name, that's why I race slot cars.

 

Anything is possible IF you don't know what you are talking about.
 
"In the beginning of a change, the PATRIOT is a scarce man, and brave and hated
and scorned. When his cause succeeds, the timid join him, for then it cost
nothing to be a PATRIOT." - Mark Twain, 1904

 

 


#23 Pablo

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 10:16 AM

Didn't I actually build Pappy a car using those rules? The green F1 that now sits on a shelf? :dash2:  :laugh2:


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#24 anumber1

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 11:04 AM

Bill,
 
I did Classic Retro because of the crap that was going on in the IRRA at the time. There's not enough people in the area that are interested in Retro in general to get a new series going, especially now that things have calmed down in the IRRA. But now that you mention it, it might be a class we could do locally since I do know a lot of guys who race the Carrera digital cars and have the bodies. 
 
As I have mentioned before, there are a number of reason's I quit racing IRRA Retro. The traveling, the cost, some of the people, a lot of the cars were just plain crappy looking, just to mention a few. When I first started the Ohio Valley Series you could go to the race, spend an hour or so working on your car, buy a $15 Falcon 7, be competitive and maybe even win the race. Now to win you have to have multiple motors, bodies and tires . Test, Test, Test for hours. Not worth it to me. I'd much rather just go to someone's house where you don't have to pay for track time or a race fee, drink a few beers, maybe lend out a car or borrow one and have a great time. But that's just me, all part of getting old I guess.

Butting in here but...

I am pretty new in the hobby but have already witnessed a series I was participating in go from inexpensive chassis and motors to checkbook racing with expensive motors shipped in and the winning cars all built by someone other than the driver.

Defenately takes the fun out of it, knowing I am not going to be competitive unle$$ I bring the same money to the table.

I now get the point of sealed motor racing. I also understand and like the thought of retro racing but don't have the time or money get competitive in it.

Seems this hobby is its own worst enemy when it comes to discuraging a new guy.

Too much ego in everything
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#25 Eddie Fleming

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 11:50 AM

I now get the point of sealed motor racing. I also understand and like the thought of retro racing but don't have the time or money get competitive in it.

 

That is the reason I was asking about production chassis. Alan is not alone.

 

On the other hand Flexi racing takes care of that and everything is well and good in our hobby sport.


Eddie Fleming

#26 Matt Sheldon

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 12:07 PM

Butting in here but...

I am pretty new in the hobby but have already witnessed a series I was participating in go from inexpensive chassis and motors to checkbook racing with expensive motors shipped in and the winning cars all built by someone other than the driver.

Defenately takes the fun out of it, knowing I am not going to be competitive unle$$ I bring the same money to the table.

I now get the point of sealed motor racing. I also understand and like the thought of retro racing but don't have the time or money get competitive in it.

Seems this hobby is its own worst enemy when it comes to discuraging a new guy.

Too much ego in everything

Alan,

 

What class of cars?

 

The difference between a built retro car using a prebuilt JK, Crutchfield or CHR chassis and your average Flexi based sealed motor class is $50. Those chassis are as competitive as anything else, especially on the local level. Now in some Ohio and NY/NJ regions it will not matter how much you spend if the states best 5-8 racers show up and that has nothing to do with the equipment. Now from my experience the flexi based stuff will go through more spur gears than the retro crown gears, depending on motors you may get quite a few more races out of a Retro Hawk in the retro classes compared to say a Hawk 7 in flexi. I only bring this up because it always seems like people want to compare dollars without looking at the whole picture. Is retro more than flexi? Yes! Is it a gross amount at the local level? No! 

 

What discourages the new guy more than anything is that it is not an easy hobby to be good at. It is a hobby that is a marathon, not a sprint. It is also a hobby that some like me struggle to ever even be average at after decades of racing. In my opinion if you are not a slot car enthusiast, then it will be very difficult to survive the growing pains as well as the ups and downs of the hobby. What has hurt the hobby is constant rule changes and class structures at the local level, period! Everybody with a better idea then the next and track owners trying to satisfy that "one" guy. Regardless if I totally agree with IRRA, SCCRA, USRA, ISRA rule structures or not, what I respect and believe in is the structure and format that changes are not made on the fly. Rules are in general a constant and you know what to expect. When the rules change they are minor and are a bigger deal on the forums then in actuality. Typical component changes are usually the result of an industry trend or equalization attempt, regardless of the often times broadcasted conspiracy theory notions.

 

My reference to a "checkbook" racer was referring to the racers that choose to purchase their chassis, not the ones with the largest checkbooks. 


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#27 Bill from NH

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 12:20 PM

The last commercial raceway in this area closed in 2010 so I have little interest running in a retro series or any other series. Fortunately, I have access to a local 4-lane Tunkel club track that runs 1/24 hard body cars. Their main classes are scratchbuilt jalopies & late models using H&R chassis & FCRs. I'm not up on their recently introduced sprint car class. I'll build legal class cars as well as some "what-ifs," to just be able to run them around the track. The "what-ifs" will be powered by motors such as H&R Hawks, Cobras, & some Chinese 16D's. No speed merchants there. The track  isn't big enough to run faster classes, but running some 1/32 scratchbuilts might be fun.


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#28 Duffy

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 12:35 PM

Seems to me that "I can't afford to compete financially with the top five racers" is a rephrasing of "If I can't win I'm not playing." Matt Sheldon has it right there. You gotta be in it first, and then see where that takes you. If a stock chassis makes that difference, by all means go for it, but once you're in the door you'll still have to stay in the room.

 

I'm a famously mediocre driver. I'm not gonna win nothing, the way I'm going. I have enough sealed motors to put into my cars and a couple more, I spend 3-4 times my motor allowance on tyres, and twice that in gas, tolls & food to travel to races. Compared to that, a chassis represents DURABLE GOODS. I'm not in the hobby to win, I'm in it to be in it.

 

I'd like to hear from the smokers among us how much their monthly tobacco budget is. Once again, we choose what's important enough to spend our money on.


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#29 Matt Sheldon

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 12:36 PM

The last commercial raceway in this area closed in 2010 so I have little interest running in a retro series or any other series. Fortunately, I have access to a local 4-lane Tunkel club track that runs 1/24 hard body cars. Their main classes are scratchbuilt jalopies & late models using H&R chassis & FCRs. I'm not up on their recently introduced sprint car class. I'll build legal class cars as well as some "what-ifs," to just be able to run them around the track. The "what-ifs" will be powered by motors such as H&R Hawks, Cobras, & some Chinese 16D's. No speed merchants there. The track  isn't big enough to run faster classes, but running some 1/32 scratchbuilts might be fun.

Bullring racing can be as fun as any other form of slot car racing, especially if run with a fun group of competitors. 


Matt Sheldon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


#30 Pablo

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 12:38 PM

Just think of the amount of $ I'm saving by building my own chassis :dance3:


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#31 Duffy

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 12:47 PM

Seriously? What do you have invested in tools and jigs? How much do you spend on metals and supplies?

 

Everything costs, and everything has a reason for costing what it does.


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#32 Pablo

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 12:52 PM

Of course not, Duffy. I own 3 irons, a gun, 5 jigs, enough metal to build until I croak, plane flight $500, hotel $300, food $50 a day, pet sitter $60 a day, time off work, etc.

 

Just pointing out the fallacy of "chassis and parts being expensive". Anybody bought any fishing gear recently? Some hooks, line, and sinkers cost $30


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#33 Duffy

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 12:56 PM

Well, I think we really need to frame this discussion in exactly those hard terms. It's easy to grumble about what you can & can't do, but be clear about how much you may just be satisfying your need to grumble.


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Michael J. Heinrich
1950-2016
Requiescat in Pace
 
And I am awaiting
perpetually and forever
a renaissance of wonder

#34 Pablo

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 12:59 PM

Yup. And may I add, seriously this time, I'm still finishing mid-pack after all these years and having as much fun as ever. :)

Slot cars is all about the people.


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Paul Wolcott

#35 Matt Sheldon

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 01:01 PM

 

Slot cars is all about the people.

And there it is folks! On that note I am off to the track to hang out with the C@@L kids.


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#36 Tim Wilkins

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 01:23 PM

Of course not, Duffy. I own 3 irons, a gun, 5 jigs, enough metal to build until I croak, plane flight $500, hotel $300, food $50 a day, pet sitter $60 a day, time off work, etc.

 

Just pointing out the fallacy of "chassis and parts being expensive". Anybody bought any fishing gear recently? Some hooks, line, and sinkers cost $30

I actually gave up fishing to afford slot car racing :laugh2: Haven't bought a license in years.  Sold off many a rod and reel.  Sold my boat to afford my own home track.  So far, so good.  It's all about doing what you like to do within your budget.


"If everything seems under control, you're not going fast enough" - Mario Andretti


#37 Pappy

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 01:50 PM

It's all about doing what you like to do within your budget.

I always tell people, you can do or own about anything you want, one at a time. If you want a boat all you have to do is give up everything else you like until you get rid of the boat.


Jim "Danger" Dunaway aka Butch
 
Danger is my middle name, that's why I race slot cars.

 

Anything is possible IF you don't know what you are talking about.
 
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and scorned. When his cause succeeds, the timid join him, for then it cost
nothing to be a PATRIOT." - Mark Twain, 1904

 

 


#38 anumber1

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 02:00 PM

Not really whining here about the state of my hobby. But I have found that it is pretty expensive "for me" to build, test, travel and race a car that is not even close competitive.

Not sour grapes at all. Just saying that since I cannot afford to race on the level of the "winners", I tend to stay in my own backyard. Good for my local track.
Alan Gallacher
 
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#39 Bill from NH

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 03:22 PM

Alan, nothing wrong with your philosophy at all.  When I was younger, I did a lot of traveling to races. I didn't often do very good, but I always enjoyed a good time. Now that I'm older, I enjoy staying closer to home. I still enjoy building the cars, but I don't build as fast or as many as I once did. Slot cars aren't my only hobby, my spare time gets shared between it & woodworking. If I had the room, I'd have a home track, but I don't. As I get older, I slow down further. :)


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#40 Rapid Rick

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Posted 20 April 2015 - 08:03 PM

 

That is the reason I was asking about production chassis. Alan is not alone.

 

On the other hand Flexi racing takes care of that and everything is well and good in our hobby sport.

 

Hello Eddie: I think Slot Car Racing in general is more work than a lot of today's kids or others are willing to spend. As a raceway owner, I am so thankful for Retro...and as a Racer, I am even more thankful.

 

Like every size or every type of racing it, all takes time and work. Reading the Slotblog Posts will reveal that many racers are having a lot of fun racing a class that hardly existed eight years ago.

 

I would hope someone reads your Post in the Atlanta area. I’m hoping you can find a builder nearby.

 

At our track in Connecticut on Friday nights, we have 8 or 10 Flexi-cars built to our FRIDAY NIGHT IROC CHAMPION Rules. Dawn my sister calls it Rent-A-Racer. They were primarily for walk-ins to join in our races. But we know have five or six regulars who come and use those cars. They even try to get there early to scoop up ‘their car’ first.

 

And on Thursday's we know have RETRO GT-COUPE. And…just like Friday, we have 3 or 4 GT-COUPE cars all-ready to go. They were built by a local guy who doesn’t want to race alone and loves to build and help.

 

Maybe the goal should be to get someone to build eight identical chassis. Nothing fancy or light. Make them stockcars if you like. I feel the task should start with getting a few friends to start…who get their friends. Use Facebook to post pictures and results. It works well. But it can take time.

 

None of this is easy... but its not like building a Space Shuttle either. I hope it never gets that complex as we’ll lose the hobby again.

 

Good Luck

 

Rapid Rick


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#41 A. J. Hoyt

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 12:05 PM

We have some racers in CO (a family with a husband, a wife and her dad) who have become "regulars" and have bought into a few of the classes that we regularly run and seem to have a great time every time they show up. More importantly, we have all watched them get noticeably better with each outing (they push each other up) and they have the encouragement of all of the other racers.

 

They "get it" and are having a blast!

 

While I was prepping my cars for the race last weekend (in between jumps into building my latest "creation" retro Can Am chassis), I realized that none of the racers in this family have the retro class cars so I earmarked some as loaners and was hoping I could get some of the other well-equipped racers to join in to make sure all three had cars to race so they wouldn't be relegated to marshaling or leaving.

 

I found out that the dad and his daughter had gone to Modelville raceway the previous week, the dad (retirement age) had been loaned a retro car and raced there during their visit. He loved the way the cars drove and was hooked.

 

I've always known Matt Sheldon to be a very generous guy. He and I teamed together to get solid handling retro cars into the hands of those who wanted to race them and, again, they had a blast! In fact, George (the dad) was VERY tough to pass using my loaned car! He was running lap times that very nearly equaled those of a podium finisher! (I reflected with Matt that loaning a car affords the really unique sensation and emotions of getting taken out by one of your own cars!).

 

I was very proud of their efforts. They now have "the bug" and were talking about finding ways to get their own retro cars. They said their problem is that costs are multiplied by three because there are three of them.

 

With some encouragement and technical guidance, "non-builders" (checkbook racers, if you prefer) can become dedicated racers in most any class.

 

I think what worked here was that they have seen and experienced the reasons why retro Can Am is so popular here. The class (along with many others) is consistently supported here, i.e., doesn't appear to be going away, tracks in CO seem to be staying in CO (even if changing hands) and there are even rumors of a new slot car racing facility opening in north Denver.

 

I think this relates precisely to the title of the thread with some of my observations. I think we have a healthy program because our local racers are welcoming, generous with their time and assistance and encouraging to the newer racers. The classes have been stable for years and we have nights that support a full range of interests (Wednesday is 1/32 hardbody, Friday has become a higher end wing car specific night with Outlaws and Gp 12, Saturday is a rotation of various classes and Sunday is for drag racing) and the better racers don't get over-the-top serious playing with their toy cars.

 

I commend Jim Rogers (Slot Car Speedway and Hobbies in Longmont) for the way he runs his programs (emphasis is on fair, fun racing) and the other racers that keep it fun.

 

Slot car racing has always been about the people. I feel very lucky to have landed in this area.

 

Keep it in the slot (and help others to do so, if you can),

 

AJ


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Never complacent - striving to race to ever increasing levels of mediocrity!

 

The only thing I know about slot cars is if I had a good time when I leave the building! I can count the times I didn't on one hand!

Entitlement:
The notion that one can have their slot car racing and EAT IT, too!

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