Jump to content




Photo

Drilling hole for setscrew after mounting donut


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 Mark Crowley

Mark Crowley

    On The Lead Lap

  • Full Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 223 posts
  • Joined: 29-March 12
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Greater Kansas City

Posted 09 May 2016 - 10:34 AM

I am confused by step 8 in Jay Guard's Tutorial on Mounting Donuts.
 
Is the intent to drill straight down from the driving surface of the tire to the set screw or do you come in from the sidewall just above the hub 90 degrees to the setscrew?

When I put on a set of factory-made tires I angle my setscrew wrench on the edge where the rim meets the tire adjacent to the setscrew and push the tire back until I reach the hole. I then straighten the wrench enough to get a good bite and tighten the setscrew. This does loosen the tire from the rim just a little right at the setscrew but does not appear to affect the running surface of the tire.
 
Am I putting on my tire incorrectly? I would think putting a hole in the "tread" of the tire near the edge might make it chunk out.

 

Thanks,
 
Mark






#2 Cheater

Cheater

    Headmaster of the asylum

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,497 posts
  • Joined: 14-February 06
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Norcross, GA

Posted 09 May 2016 - 10:45 AM

Mark,

On some, perhaps most, commercially-made tires, the setscrew hole is accessed by prying the edge of the rubber aside to expose it.

On others, the setscrew is reached via a hole in the rubber itself. On these wheels, the setscrews are usually farther away from the back edge of the rim. As for there being a problem with the rubber 'chunking' around the small hole, keep in mind that the rubber is glued to the hub all the way around the hole.

As Jay indicated, the design/make of the hub determines which way to go.


Gregory Wells

Never forget that first place goes to the racer with the MOST laps, not the racer with the FASTEST lap


#3 Cheater

Cheater

    Headmaster of the asylum

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,497 posts
  • Joined: 14-February 06
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Norcross, GA

Posted 09 May 2016 - 11:09 AM

Mark,

 

Here's a pic for you, of an old hardened 'full-hub' tire from my junk tire bag. 

 

tire.jpg

 

Does this help to clear up your confusion?


Gregory Wells

Never forget that first place goes to the racer with the MOST laps, not the racer with the FASTEST lap


#4 Mark Crowley

Mark Crowley

    On The Lead Lap

  • Full Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 223 posts
  • Joined: 29-March 12
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Greater Kansas City

Posted 09 May 2016 - 11:16 AM

Absolutely. I was into slot cars in the early '60s, briefly in the '80s, and now since late 2000s and I have never seen a hole in a tire like that.  

 

Guess I need to get out of Kansas City every once and a while.

 

Thanks,

 

Mark



#5 Bill from NH

Bill from NH

    Age scrubs away speed!

  • Full Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,726 posts
  • Joined: 02-August 07
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Boston, NH

Posted 09 May 2016 - 12:28 PM

Mark, most tires with set screws in the rubber like the above photo will be called "Euro Hub" or some similar name to differentiate that particular hub style.

 

If you're ever mounting new rubber on that style hub, a good way to put the wrench hole through the donut is to use a hot pin or piece of piano wire.


  • Cheater likes this

Bill Fernald
 

How old should a highway be before you tell it, that it has been adopted?


#6 Cheater

Cheater

    Headmaster of the asylum

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 22,497 posts
  • Joined: 14-February 06
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Norcross, GA

Posted 09 May 2016 - 12:39 PM

Pretty sure the tire I showed is a SpeedShop tire from Lee Gilbert, which uses an unusual hub style. Most of the 'full hub" tires will have a full flat face on the setscrew side.


Gregory Wells

Never forget that first place goes to the racer with the MOST laps, not the racer with the FASTEST lap


#7 Zippity

Zippity

    Posting Leader

  • Full Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,600 posts
  • Joined: 05-March 06
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Wellington, New Zealand

Posted 09 May 2016 - 12:52 PM

I drill holes through the rubber on all my tyres - it makes accessing the setscrew so much easier.

 

457790d1243037462-best-dremel-bit-alumin



#8 Mike K

Mike K

    Checkered Flag in Hand

  • Full Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,244 posts
  • Joined: 20-February 06
  • Gender:Male

Posted 09 May 2016 - 12:56 PM

A pin vise with a 1/16" drill bit works well.


  • Tim Neja likes this

So much DRAMA for such small cars....
Mike Kravitz

Don't DQ me for having the wrong SHADE of orange on my McLaren... after all, it's ONLY a toy car!!!


#9 Bill from NH

Bill from NH

    Age scrubs away speed!

  • Full Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,726 posts
  • Joined: 02-August 07
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Boston, NH

Posted 09 May 2016 - 02:58 PM

Use whatever works for you, but I've found drill bits and other tools can leave rubber particles in your threaded setscrew hole.


Bill Fernald
 

How old should a highway be before you tell it, that it has been adopted?


#10 Mark Crowley

Mark Crowley

    On The Lead Lap

  • Full Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 223 posts
  • Joined: 29-March 12
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Greater Kansas City

Posted 09 May 2016 - 03:11 PM

Almost all of stash of hubs are JK plastic and many of the 3/32" hubs have been narrowed a little.  For these the set screw is very close to the edge and on the cut 3/32" the setscrews are exposed.

 

Great info everyone.

 

Thanks,

 

Mark



#11 Jay Guard

Jay Guard

    Checkered Flag in Hand

  • Administrator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,236 posts
  • Joined: 10-December 06
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Anniston, AL

Posted 09 May 2016 - 06:33 PM

Greg explained the "hole in the tire" thing very well.  

 

As Zippity showed in post #7 I use a Dremel with a carbide ball-cutter bit to make the hole in the tire. It takes a bit of practice but once you've done it a few times it's no problem at all. I've mounted hundreds of tires on my Speedshop "Euro" hubs and never had a problem with chunking of the rubber around the set screw hole. The big advantage to this type of hub is that it really helps to keep the glue out of the set screw.  This is a big problem on many of the other style of hubs.


Jay Guard
Retro Racer &
Flat Track Fanatic


#12 Mark Crowley

Mark Crowley

    On The Lead Lap

  • Full Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 223 posts
  • Joined: 29-March 12
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Greater Kansas City

Posted 09 May 2016 - 07:48 PM

Big thanks to Jay and Ron for posting their experience on mounting tires for all to see.

 

Mark







Electric Dreams Online Shop