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Homeset cars


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#26 Dennis David

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 10:57 AM

Adding weight also depends on the grip level of the track and your tires. Low grip and more weight may cause your car to slide more.

One reason I like a track with more grip.


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#27 bbr

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 11:06 AM

Last weekend, on your track, my car acted like it had no guide at all on the turn going into the long straight. That was probably because I'm stubborn and refuse to add weight on tracks with elevation. I'm pretty sure the uphill approach to a curves that turns downward carried my lightweight car just high enough to clear the slot.


Tuning a car on race days is always problematic. The most successful racers, I observed, have multiple cars with different setups.


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#28 Dennis David

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 11:51 AM

Unless you're James Grandi...


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#29 BugleBoy10

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 02:14 PM

Adding weight also depends on the grip level of the track and your tires. Low grip and more weight may cause your car to slide more.

One reason I like a track with more grip.

 

Adding weight also depends on the grip level of the track and your tires. Low grip and more weight may cause your car to slide more.

One reason I like a track with more grip.

Agreed. I figure a little more weight but with the same balance point would have done the trick, but didn't have enough practice time to test it out. The car still did well, but I cost myself at least one place by not driving those elevation curves more carefully.

 

Tuning a car on race days is always problematic. The most successful racers, I observed, have multiple cars with different setups.

Also agreed, but there is such limited tuning time when you're racing on people's home tracks that aren't available all the time. I look forward to having the home track advantage on occasion once I finish my track at home.


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#30 Dennis David

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 02:47 PM

Then you need to build some obstacles that only you know about LOL


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#31 eshorer

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 04:01 PM

Last weekend, on your track, my car acted like it had no guide at all on the turn going into the long straight. That was probably because I'm stubborn and refuse to add weight on tracks with elevation. I'm pretty sure the uphill approach to a curves that turns downward carried my lightweight car just high enough to clear the slot.

 

That turn (the lead-on) is tricky, especially on the Yellow lane, which is super tight. If you were popping out there it was due to one of following: 1. the guide being too shallow (correctable with truing front tires, just not too much so they don't hit the track), 2. stuck guide post 3. rear tires too grippy, causing you to tilt out. 4. Car is too light. 5. Some combo of some of the above. 

When I'm back from traveling (mid-July), come over on some non-race days and get a little of that home track advantage here!

Eddie


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#32 bbr

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 05:07 PM

The barometer is to know what is a fast car is for a particular track. Then use your knowledge to get your car there.

Example: I been playing with group f wing cars, but have not much of a clue. I got my hands on a first class car, now I know what its like, so I can use what tuning knowledge I have to get the car to that level of performance.

Like turn 1 at Indy, a good car should be flat out with no lift.
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Give me enough rope and I'll build a fast car... or hang myself?

#33 Samiam

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Posted 11 June 2017 - 11:04 AM

"... while a race-ready Retro car can run $350."
 
THIS brand new race-ready one can be had for $130.

Add $15 for tires and you're good to go.
 
edit: Too late.
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#34 Dennis David

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Posted 11 June 2017 - 10:30 PM

Personally I think the $350 price tag is $100 too high.

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#35 Bill from NH

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 08:15 AM

Even at $250 for the going price, if I was going to race Retros, I'd learn how to build chassis and paint bodies. :)  Collecting might be an entirely different matter.


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#36 Dennis David

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 09:19 AM

That's you, but if you look at the tech sheets there are a lot of people buying chassis at least and I can tell you from personal experience that Noose stays pretty busy painting bodies!

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#37 Dennis David

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 09:48 AM

Getting back to "homeset" cars, most of which are miss-categorized, what are they really?

For people who race them I would say the determinating characteristic is a single-piece chassis and press-on plastic wheels. Once you have added a motor pod and metal set screw wheels you've priced the car beyond what would go in a home set.

Now while you can race this car on a home track it would be better called a club car or a 1/32 car or a 1/32 hardbody. These cars are made to be collected or raced in clubs. The fact that most clubs in the US race on tracks in people's homes not withstanding the US is not their largest market.


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#38 Dennis David

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 09:54 AM

Now a 1/24 BRM or Scaleauto definitely can not be called a homeset car but that should not mean that 1/32 cars are all homeset cars. It's like calling the Lexan cars that most of us race "bubble" cars but that's exactly what they are called in some countries.


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