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Motor fitment AMT 1/25 slot car kit?


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#1 geardriven

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 02:34 PM

Hi,

 

Unsure if I placed this in the correct catagory. With a friend, I was discussing motor fitment on the newer AMT 1/25 slot car kits ('66 Nova).

 

I was advised that the original motor was up fitted with a vintage Revell SP600. Looking at one of the motor ID websites, I see that the Revell SP600 is a endbell drive 36D.

 

I did not see this particular car, but I did build the AMT Camaro kit and upgraded the motor with an H&R 40K motor. It appeared that this motor was of a 16D case size and just fit...

 

Considering case diameter, is it possible or has anyone ever seen a 36D motor in one of these AMT kit chassis...???


Chuck Tresp




#2 Mattb

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Posted 27 October 2016 - 04:02 PM

Be hard to fit it in. Not sure why you would want a big dinosaur motor in there when the newer small motors are much better in every aspect. The 1960s AMT inline brass chassis did use the 36D motor, but they were a good chassis design for that period, but the motors added crazy weight and hurt the handling with the high CoG.

Pretty crappy kit actually. It is a shame that it has the AMT name on it. Typical of today's business minds.

Junior marketing person says "There is a place for an economical 1/25 slot car kit on the market. Why don't we tap into that market?"

Boss says, "OK, get some slot experts to help design a good kit, and let's see what we can do with the molds we allready own."

Bookeeper says, "Get some girl from accounting to design it, and don't pay some slot car expert. That way we will really make a profit."

Then they wonder why the kits got marked down to $10-$15, and they get out of the slot car market!


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Matt Bishop

Vintage Cox Slot Cars

#3 geardriven

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 01:53 PM

The reason I ask is I bought a very nicely done/finished AMT kit/car. The car had a multitude of upgrades, one being a motor replacement.
When I received the car, a box from an old NOS Revell SP600 was in the box with the car.
I used an Internet site about slot motor identification and I thought a Revell SP600 fit in the end bell drive 36D family.
I agree this is a "fat" motor to fit in that chassis. I did not remove the body to inspect and that I will need to do.
I tried building the '70 Camaro version, got about 3/4 through the build and threw the crap in the box. I installed a H&R RTR chassis under the Camaro body and never looked back.
I do recollect the the motor area looks "16D" in size and a 16D stock or "warmed over" would be a much better candidate for the job.
Chuck Tresp

#4 Ramcatlarry

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 04:38 PM

The AMT cars from the old days had Mabuchi 16d and 36d motors in their nice BRASS one piece frames.  The design evolved into womp and FCR frames.


Larry D. Kelley, MA
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#5 Mattb

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Posted 29 October 2016 - 08:36 PM

Larry, the 1/32 cars had the fixed wheelbase frame with a can drive 16 D. Those 1/24 Super Stock cars had the 36D's in the adjustable frame.

There are a bunch of upgrades needed to make the new AMT kits useable and reliable. Where to start? Pretty much throw away everything except the frame. Cut a brass pan to fit under the frame and solder it all together. Reinforce the axle bushing ears or else straighten them every time the car hits the wall. Drill the axle bushing holes for new 1/8 bushing and axles and throw away the stock axles that you can bend with your fingers. You can drill the wheels to 1/8 and use them. Of course,t he rear will have to be urethanes or something new. Throw away the gears and get new ones. Throw away the guide flag. But, the motors actually surprised me, on a 25 foot straight they actually do all right. Much easier to just cut a brass pan and solder a rear motor bracket to it and a front axle/guide flag holder to it. Forget using any of the amt stuff except the body!!
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Matt Bishop

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