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Setting bite bar height


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#1 SlowBeas

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Posted 08 November 2016 - 01:34 PM

Okay, don't laugh. I realize this question will likely seem idiotic to some, but I fight this problem whenever I try to "create" a new design. Rarely do I do things the easy way and just copy someone else's (such as Jim's or Tony P's) build.

 

Considering the different thicknesses of brass pans and accompanying wires, I sometimes struggle to get my bite bar spaced to the proper height to allow the pans to seat properly. If math tells me that I need a .015  spacer to bring things to equal height, I find that something still doesn't quite "fit" once the soldering is done. Sometimes, the pan either lifts or droops slightly on one side.

 

Could one of your experienced scratchbuilders offer me a little advice to help me feel less stupid when I build my next chassis?

 

Now, please stop laughing.

jb


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#2 Half Fast

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Posted 08 November 2016 - 02:02 PM

There is nothing idiotic about this question.

 

I'm sure a lot of people would like to see a discussion on this.

 

Cheers


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#3 Cap Henry

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Posted 08 November 2016 - 03:17 PM

With floating bite bars it can be as simple as the piece of wire isn't perfectly straight. Everything has to be as straight as possible, pans, center section, bite bar, etc.

The easiest thing I've seen lately is doing it with wire hooks like Tony is now, you adjust up movement by tape or material under the bite bar.

I got away from floating bite bars because I didn't see the benefit to all the work, and I was trying to avoid having something running across the chassis side to side, but that's an entirely different subject 😊
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#4 tonyp

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Posted 08 November 2016 - 03:40 PM

Easiest way is to use wire stops, old school style. You car tap them on top to make a tiny adjustment if the pans are a little low. I use tape under them to adjust up and down play according to tracks and conditions.
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#5 John Streisguth

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Posted 08 November 2016 - 04:04 PM

I'm of the same school of thought as Cap, solid bite bars are simpler and I haven't found them to have any benefit for me, in fact I like the feel of the solid ones better.   


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#6 Pablo

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Posted 08 November 2016 - 04:06 PM

Jim, calipers and math don't lie. That leaves solder as a possible culprit. Tinning brass sheet only adds a thou or two thickness.

 

What is your definition of "pan lift" and "pan droop" ? Pans are supposed to lift, and a little pan droop won't hurt you until it doesn't pass tech and/or drags the track.

 

Look at a modern flexi chassis like a JK and tell me how much pan lift and droop you see, Jim. Then take an aspirin and report back :)

See the burn marks under the chassis ? Any pan droop or center section flex there ? :laugh2: 

Obviously it all depends what type of chassis you are building. A picture would help.


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#7 SlowBeas

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Posted 08 November 2016 - 04:30 PM

Interesting input. I need to review Tony's use of the wire stops to see if that might be an easier method than what I'm doing now.

 

Pablo, I've often used calipers (or been too lazy and merely relied on the brass' label that tells me it's supposed to be a specific thickness), but I have actually found that the thickness of a thin coat of solder can result in a slight bit of rise or droop -- depending on where the solder is applied. It becomes a bit frustrating, since I plan things in advance to ensure my height settings will be correct.

 

I've had some luck with Jim F's method of using wire stops under the hinges connecting pans and main rails. I'm now experimenting on their use over the pans, with no real results to report as of yet.

 

I'm glad to see that there are others who consider this topic worthy of a little discussion. It's always good to hear the view (and see examples) of those who build such great chassis. Thanks for your help.

jb


Jim Beasley
South Carolina, USA

"Assuming either the Left Wing or the Right Wing gained control of the country, it would probably fly around in circles."
- Pat Paulsen, 1968
"I drive way too fast to worry about cholesterol."
- Steven Wright ca. 1983

#8 slotcarone

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Posted 08 November 2016 - 05:39 PM

I too use wire stops. Very easy to set the pan height and then if there is too much pan lift just put a piece of insulating tape under the bite bar on the pan.


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