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Strombecker 1/24 Lotus rear axle question


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#1 Lone Wolf

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Posted 16 November 2016 - 04:27 PM

Trying to put together a 1/24 Strombecker Lotus to prepare it for sale.  This is the one that uses the Scuttler type motor. They made 2 motor versions of the Lotus. 

 

Does anyone have a pic of the instructions or the actual car I could look at? The axle ends are usually knurled to retain the wheels but that would prevent bearings sliding on. 

 

Any ideas? 

 

Can show pics if needed.

 

Thanks


Joe Lupo





#2 don.siegel

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Posted 16 November 2016 - 05:16 PM

Joe, 

 

I've never seen or heard of a Strombecker Lotus with the Scuttler motor - only with the set type motor. I assume you're talking about the Indy Lotus that came out pretty early... 

 

The 1/24 cars with the Scuttler were the Ferrari and Brabham F1 cars. 

 

Don 



#3 Lone Wolf

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Posted 16 November 2016 - 07:51 PM

Don, not sure if I'm getting things mixed up here. Most of the 1/24 scale Lotus's have the set motor as you described. Some, I assume later cars used the motor with built in axle brackets. I believe the Scuttler or Avenger.

 

The blue body takes your standard motor, the white, the Scuttler.

 

DSC00015.JPG

 

You can see the differences from the factory.

 

DSC00016.JPG

 

My question is that the axles are splined so how did a bearing go over it? The only thing I can think of is that they used those sloppy fitting bearings with the hex on them. They can slide over a spline but are really loose. I don't think this is how they did it. A standard oilite that will fit the motor will not slide over the spline. Yes, I know that's a front axle shown. 

 

P.S. Strombecker calls this the Lotus Ford.


Joe Lupo


#4 don.siegel

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Posted 17 November 2016 - 04:28 AM

Thanks for photos Joe. 

 

Must admit that this is a new one for me, and have never seen this variant before. Odd that they would still use the splined axle for this... in any case 'fraid I can't help. 

 

Anybody else have this version of the car or an instruction sheet? 

 

Don 



#5 Lone Wolf

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Posted 21 November 2016 - 03:35 PM

CAN ANYONE HELP WITH THIS  :dash2:

 

I also need a copy of the instructions for either version as well as repro decals.

 

I know E.D. has the "green" car version decals. I am looking for the decals for the blue and white cars.

 

Any help at all would be greatly appreciated, Thanks


Joe Lupo


#6 slotbaker

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Posted 21 November 2016 - 04:54 PM

G'day Joe, I don't have the Lotus Ford with the Scuttler motor, but do have the Brabham F1.
I'm guessing the rear setup would be the same??
The Brabham has threaded rear axle and wheels.

As for the decals for the white/blue Gurney car, I got a sheet from ebay, but can't remember the seller.  I'll see if I can dig it out of my ebay/paypal records.

Strom%2024%20Brabham%20F1%20chassis-a_zp

 

Strom%2024%20Brabham%20F1%20instruct-1_z

 

Strom%2024%20Brabham%20F1%20instruct-2_z

 

Strom%2024%20Brabham%20F1%20instruct-3_z

 

Strom%2024%20Brabham%20F1%20instruct-4_z

 

Hope this helps a bit.

:)


Steve King


#7 Mattb

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Posted 21 November 2016 - 04:59 PM

Not saying it couldn't exist, but I've never seen a Lotus with the skuttler chassis, only the clamshell design.
Matt Bishop

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#8 Lone Wolf

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Posted 21 November 2016 - 08:12 PM

Thanks Steve, I'm not sure thats the answer but we will keep trying. Let me know on the decals.

 

Matt, here is mine with a Scuttler. 

 

This is made this way from the factory,not modified.

 

DSC00071.JPG

 

Here it is compared to the "standard" motor version and you can see the factory cut out for the brushes as well as other differences.

 

DSC00070.JPG


Joe Lupo


#9 Lone Wolf

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Posted 21 November 2016 - 08:19 PM

Okay, right after I posted the above I went searching Ebay for decals as per Steves idea.

 

Look what I found!

 

What the hell is this. It looks like a battery operated tether car. Look at the battery motor in the box. The motor goes in the box, not the car.

 

The body halves are the same as mine. Look how perfectly a scuttler motor drops in mine.

 

Maybe they had it slated to be made this way but it never went into production. Just sold as that battery car.

 

Still confused.

 

 

 

http://www.ebay.com/...KsAAOSwXeJYITUt


Joe Lupo


#10 Mattb

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Posted 21 November 2016 - 11:56 PM

I have never seen the Lotus with the Skuttler chassis like the Brabham used, as pictured above. Your car only uses the motor, not the chassis. I think they were all clamshell design and they never made one with a full chassis.
Matt Bishop

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#11 slotbaker

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Posted 30 November 2016 - 05:22 AM

Hey Joe, there is a decal sheet on ebay here.

I couldn't find the info on my one.


Steve King


#12 TSR

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Posted 20 September 2017 - 03:13 PM

The Strombecker Lotus 29 had three different motorizations.

 

The slot car kit first received the standard Igarashi "9091" found in all the 1/32 cars from 1963 through 1965. then by mid-1965, the Scuttler.

 

The RTR version may also have received both, hard to tell until inspecting one still sealed in its box.

 

But the cutout sides seen on the later Scuttler version are for the "pylon" version which received the same type of Mabuchi motors used in the first 1/32 Jaguar RTR models used in the racing sets. Hence the cutouts to clear the wide square magnets.
Joe, the motor inside the box may have helped to make the box rotate at 10000 RPM, but it would have left the car just sitting there... the motor goes IN the car. :)

 

IUsing that old motor was likely a way for Strombecker, now owned by the Dowst Manufacturing Company to get rid of the piles of those leftover motors inherited from the old Strombeck-Becker company. Since they likely sold only a few hundreds of those "around the pylon" cars, sold in plain-Jane brown cardboard boxes by the way, I think that the plan failed.
 

308_motor.jpg



#13 zipper

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Posted 20 September 2017 - 03:54 PM

Wow, last time I saw a toy motor like that was 55 years ago, before I started with slot cars. Put one TKK motor into USS Coral Sea to make it floating on the pool in front of our house. Making it watertight needed some trickery.


Pekka Sippola

#14 don.siegel

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Posted 20 September 2017 - 04:08 PM

Kako - they were actually used on a fair number of early slot cars, including the first Ungar/Eldons, and some made in Hong Kong...

 

Don



#15 TSR

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Posted 20 September 2017 - 07:19 PM

It is hard to figure out these early Mabuchi motors, but I have researched it with a fine kimono comb and was able to find that this motor, used in many plastic model kits and early slot cars, was artistically called " No 3" by the mabuchi brothers. There are actually 5 sizes for these crude devices, and Mabuchi was not the only company making nearly identical motors. Ever heard of "Mikuny" (nothing to do with misspelled motorcycle carburetors).  :)

 



#16 don.siegel

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Posted 21 September 2017 - 05:48 AM

I have an ad somewhere in a 50s Model Maker, with the whole lineup... it was already the cheap option for early R/C and all kinds of motorized models... will try to find! 

 

Don 



#17 Gary Bluestone

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Posted 22 September 2017 - 04:09 AM

I recently restored a Lotus and had to replace the gear. If I remember correctly the splined axle  did slip through the bearing . The whole clam shell thing is pretty sloppy and not competitive at all, I just wanted to make a few ceremonial laps with it. If you really want to make this car work well, either use a plain axle and epoxy the wheels on, or change the wheels to match the plain or threaded axle. This won't devalue the car if you keep the old wheels and splined axle for future restoration. Mine is now a shelf racer and for real fun we race the Revell and Cox F1s with the odd Russkit and Atlas and MPC thrown in. The later 2 are almost unbeatable.



#18 don.siegel

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Posted 22 September 2017 - 03:44 PM

Here's the ad I was thinking of, from RipMax (marine accessories), in the August 1959 issue of Model Maker. 

 

Seems like the popular one was the Super Q 3 from Kako, which gave 9,000 rpm at 4.5 volts! Not bad, even if torque was probably very low... An .091 shaft if you can't read the specs chart. In earlier ads from RipoMax, these were just designated as the Kako 3, 4 and 5... A lot cheaper than the gas/diesel engines around at the time! 

 

Don 

 

Kako%20motor%20ad-MM0859-1_zpszw5ph3vc.j

 

Kako%20motor%20ad-MM0859-2_zps1qqayhyq.j



#19 TSR

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Posted 22 September 2017 - 07:02 PM

Don,
all these motors are from different Japanese and British companies. Coming back to the "KaKo" definition, since these are not Mabuchi motors, the word must apply to motors with magnets in side pockets as it was a very popular motor type in Japan in the day (but not much anywhere else!). Now I have to investigate, who really was "Super Q" with one of my Japanese friends...







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