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What to do with a C motor


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#1 havlicek

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Posted 27 November 2016 - 10:55 AM

While going over how to have "vintage style" fun with modern D motors, the same possibilities exist for modern C motors. Brass rod, plate, tubing and piano wire are still cheap, but the classic C motors (especially in pristine condition) not so much! Of course, the idea of running one just to slam the bank isn't so appealing when the possibility of demoing a prized collectible becomes apparent.  
 
So, what to do when you want to build a chassis something like the old "lead sleds," paint up a repop body and have some fun? Well, there's really no reason not to just use a modern C motor. They may not be quite as cheap as the some of the D motors (even though there's no real reason why), but there are plenty of them around, both new and needing some TLC.  

As a canvas for some self-expression and/or a way to power-up a "vintage recreation," they'll pretty much just drop right in to a chassis built for the old motors, or a new chassis built to approximate one of the classics. Now, before you yell... sacrilege!, remember, the idea here is to have fun... not to minimize the beauty and value of keeping the classics alive or even to be 100% correct. That stuff is a whole 'nuther and wonderful thing.  
 
If a builder wants, he/she can also add some "vintage style" tweaks to a new motor, both to put his/her own "stamp" on the build, but also to add a little more vintage "flavor." Here, I painted the can. New motors are generally just plated. It's a durable and pretty much troublefree way to finish a can, but the old ones were often painted. Since the critical dimensions haven't changed with either the D or the C-can dimensions, you can always use an older endbell.
 
Here, I used one from Professor Motor. I don't know who originally made these or what timeframe they belong to, but they're a close "twin" to the tall tower Mura endbells, and the hole pattern matches, so I installed some generic Mura hardware. No bussbars or elephant ears, but hey... we're having fun right? Of course, you could easily just use a modern endbell, whatever's cheapest and easiest. For the can, I just used what landed in my hand first, in this case it was an RJR... but a Pro Slot or a Mura or whatever would be fine as well.  

The last bit of the equation is an armature. Any number of C-can arms are available stock, and you just have to hit your budget and intended purpose. In my mind a short stack hot wind wouldn't be the best choice, since they tend to favor RPM over torque, and a "lead sled" is going to want some grunt. You may even have an old arm laying around that you never tossed, or know someone who has some.  Getting the comm recut and the balance tweaked isn't an expensive or difficult thing to manage, and even if there isn't much life left in the old arm, it might be fine for less-than-serious-running.  
 
In this case, I wound a #26, but I did use a stack I had originally intended for something else and was able to "make it work" for this motor.
 
IMG_1825_zpsvjhp02vv.jpg

IMG_1824_zpsn1b4h51g.jpg 

So, the pure and correct thing is valuable for the history and the craft, but if you want to try your hand at building and running something sort of "like" the old beauties just for giggles, there's no reason not to just go for it. The parts are out there, you just have to decide what to do with them!

-john


  • B.C., John Streisguth, boxerdog and 3 others like this
John Havlicek




#2 SlotStox#53

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Posted 27 November 2016 - 11:19 AM

Tasty looking C-can, John!

Should look right at home in a leadsled ready to hit the bank.  :D

Remember Rick doing a modern take on the leadsled mill with a Group 20 arm with wild timing and hefty mags in a Mura can. Similar power but with reliability to punch the bank lap after lap (without worrying about the vintage comm throwing itself apart!!)



#3 havlicek

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Posted 27 November 2016 - 12:20 PM

Thanks, Paul.  
 

Remember Rick doing a modern take on the leadsled mill with a Group 20 arm with wild timing and hefty mags in a Mura can.

 
Hard to remember, when Rick has done so many beautiful builds of both chassis and motors! His builds are so off the hook that I would imagine they've inspired people to try their hand at doing similar things... but the motors are getting up there at this point. I see no reason why that should stop people from reliving the "golden age"... or even experiencing it for the first time.  :)
 
-john


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