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A Walnut is born


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#1 havlicek

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Posted 29 November 2016 - 05:17 PM

Step one, dig through the trash and look for one of these:
IMG_1831_zps7vsqigdp.jpg

 

They're free!

Next, grind off those itty bitty little tabs and give the shaft on the other end a rap against something hard.  Everything should come apart with no problemos.  Pry out the two magnet clips and then give the open end another rap on something nhard and the magnets will most often just pop out as well.  Now that you're done with all that...throw everything but the magnets, clips and can away (*unless you wanna try rewinding the arm).

IMG_1832_zpsvffvdnro.jpg

 

Now you can do some scratching to lay stuff out.  I scribe a line on both flats at .750", and do some other marks for guides.  When I cut the length, I stay away from the lines and then start truing everything up by playing the open can end against the flat of a large grinding disk.  

IMG_1833_zpsplynpwt9.jpg

Once I get it so I have the same length on both flats (*within a thousandth or so) and the end is smooth/shiny on all four sides (both flats and both radii), indicating the grinding disc was making full contact, I call it done.  In this case, I also opened up the two can holes and squared off the corners for a little better breathing.  Last, the two "magnet stops" that are formed into the rear end of the can get ground out.  They now become axle-clearance notches as well as allowing for more flexibility installing the magnets as far as "fore and aft" positioning.

 

Last, using an end bell and a goofy alignment "tool" made from a junk shaft and some tubing, a new tight bushing gets soldered-in.  We're getting close to having an actual setup.

Of course, the inside gets cleaned-up after soldering-in the bushing, also making sure that any old magnet glue gets removed.  The rim inside the open end of the can gets a slight "bevel" to ease installing the end bell.  Warning, blurry photo alert!  :)

IMG_1835_zpsth7nlbgg.jpg

One of the last pieces of the puzzle is fitting an end bell.  While the original motor is called an "fk" size, end bells for motors like the PS "Euro" and Hawk (*which are also called "fk" size), will not fit here.  You need to "shave down" both curved faces of the end bell, but not the top and bottom flats.  I use a spiral cutter in the grinder that doesn't have an "end cutting" profile.  That way, you can use the very slight "lip" on these end bells to play the tool tip against (*carefully/lightly) and shave down the curves.  Once the end bell fits snugly, I give the two curves a light sanding to smooth things out and also put a slight bevel on the bottom of the end bell to also help ease installing it.  This little bit of work on the end bell is a lot easier than turning down a C can end bell (*today, we're lucky to have ready-to-go end bells), and doesn't require a lathe and fixture gizmos.

A final check for end bell/can bushing alignment, and the only chore left is to drill the can for end bell mounting/securing holes.  After that, the setup is basically "there", at least there-enough to build an arm and lock-in the magnet position.

IMG_1836_zpsfrom1nvh.jpg

 

-john


 


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John Havlicek




#2 SlotStox#53

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Posted 29 November 2016 - 05:37 PM

Always a sweet little mill when you make one of these John :)

With the size of these would you be able to slot in an aftermarket arm from the Hawk/6 motors?

#3 havlicek

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Posted 29 November 2016 - 07:52 PM

Hi Paul,
 
I've never tried, but it wouldn't surprise me if they would either drop in or need only a bit of extra-spacing.  

When I settled on a length for the can, I sort of started from a place where I said to myself... "how much of the motor is taken up by what would be the endbell on a regular small can motor?" Twiddling-around from there I settled on approximately .750", but the actual length of the Hawk or any other motor was never a "target." That length is only a *minimum* though, and most (like this one) are a bit over that. However much it takes to get the can square/true is where each one "lands." That general range is fairly close to where the PS Euro minican is, and I think the Hawk as well.  

At this length I can get a stack length of .400" in there fairly comfortably, and that's really more what I used for a "check" on the original can length.  

Another "thing" here is, the magnets usually wind up very close to sitting where they would have been in the stock motor... so everything just seemed to be "aiming" or "steering" me towards an approximate can length of .750".
 
-john
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John Havlicek

#4 olescratch

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Posted 30 November 2016 - 12:35 PM

Gonna have to "copy" this entire post for future references!  Awesome, I think this is the "best" use for once throwaway motors.  I will say that they no longer come free.  I went to my "local" track where the owner kept a box of them that had come to the end of use and had to pay (a very small sum) for each one!!  You are creating a value for these things, keep it up!  On with the build please!


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John Stewart

#5 havlicek

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Posted 30 November 2016 - 12:55 PM

Hi John and thanks.  I'm surprised that some are charging for these, as I doubt there are enough people doing this sort of thing to create a market.  Actually, I'm more than surprised, I'm kind of bummed because at least part of the whole idea here is to hopefully inspire people to satisfy a creative itch by repurposing "free" things others have no more use for.  I always saw these more as "raw materials" than junk...but I guess I'm an optimist.  In any case, my crystal ball sez we won't be seeing a "walnut" class in sanctioned racing.  :D

I sure hope that this isn't the end of people sending me stuff!  I've reused these, old Mabuchis and Muras, modern D motors and all sorts of oddballs that mostly come from people who've cleaned out old stuff and preferred to see someone get use out of them than to just toss them.  

 

-john


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#6 olescratch

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Posted 30 November 2016 - 01:18 PM

I don't know, who would have ever thought that people would be shipping their cars all over the world to be entered in "proxy" races.  I could see "private" races being held that would include the use of fk conversions as power plants.  This is more of a home track type production.  I plan to create as many cars as I can using these type of motors for power.  Look at what's going on with the padlocks.  Every race really doesn't have to be sanctioned by the "Bod" to obtain interest.  I have a "group" of grandkids I would love to introduce to slots, this may be the way.  And one other thing, when you started seeing "junkyard" lots of motors showing up on sites like E-pay, there was proof that a market existed for these things.  One man's trash becomes another's treasure you know! 


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#7 lucapgt

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Posted 01 December 2016 - 11:02 AM

Hi John,

 

Have you a picture of your "spiral cutter in the grinder"?

 

Thanks


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Luca Baratti

#8 havlicek

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Posted 01 December 2016 - 04:11 PM

Ciao Luca,
 
ecco una foto del bit che io uso per questo. Questa è realizzata in carburo solido, ma se si utilizzano solo questo per taglio plastica, un normale acciaio (in acciaio ad alta velocità) uno sarà buono. L'estremità del bit è piatta e non tagliare se siete attenti, in modo che sia possibile eseguire il bit contro la parte sollevata della campana di estremità come una guida per la rifilatura dei lati. Se si sta rimuovendo un sacco di materiale, come ad esempio quando si utilizza una estremità più grande campana, devi andare lentamente e misurare ogni lato come si taglia. Buona fortuna e dire ciao a tutti i piloti italiani!
 
IMG_1852_zpsqsxa5zyd.jpg
 
-GIOVANNI

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#9 lucapgt

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Posted 01 December 2016 - 04:17 PM

Ok, you use this tool "by hand" on a "dremel" or with an "automatic" or semi-automatic tool?
Luca Baratti

#10 havlicek

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Posted 01 December 2016 - 04:57 PM

Hi Luca...I just use it by hand in a tool "like" a Dremel made by a company called "Proxxon.  Same type tool, just much better.

 

-john


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#11 havlicek

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Posted 03 December 2016 - 01:14 PM

...and just a couple of "c-ya-l8tr" shots before the arm goes out for grinding and balancing.  This little guy really came out sweet.  There are little niggling details that bug me about these things, but not here.  The arm centers beautifully, spins perfectly in the setup by hand, and the "grab" of the magnets feels just the way I like it to.  There's really not much of a question in my mind as to how it will run when they get to this point and are like this little guy :)

IMG_1855_zpseewadb47.jpg

IMG_1854_zps5aqudkfx.jpg

 

-john


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#12 lucapgt

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Posted 04 December 2016 - 04:24 AM

interesting, i would try with an hawk endbell.


Another question, what do you mean exactly when you say this:

"Last, using an end bell and a goofy alignment "tool" made from a junk shaft and some tubing, a new tight bushing gets soldered-in. We're getting close to having an actual setup."

Thanks
Luca Baratti

#13 havlicek

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Posted 04 December 2016 - 07:53 AM

Hi Luca,

 

 

 

interesting, i would try with an hawk endbell.

 

I do them with either.  Both end bells have one annoying thing, there isn't enough material around the bushing (*the depth of the bushing pocket) and/or the end bell isn't molded tight enough to firmly hold the bushing.  The bushings tend to loosen and fall out of both of them.  I don't know if either is better in this regard, but both work well here.

 

 

 

Another question, what do you mean exactly when you say this: 

"Last, using an end bell and a goofy alignment "tool" made from a junk shaft and some tubing, a new tight bushing gets soldered-in. We're getting close to having an actual setup."

Place a length of tubing that fits over a shaft and is around the length of an armature and has nice square ends on the shaft and solder in place on one end only.  You want extra shaft length that has no solder near it's end.  Then, you can install that into the can with the loose bushing or bearing on one end, install the end bell on the other end, and the shaft will be held in good alignment while you either solder or epoxy the bushing/bearing in place.  The tubing will bear against the bushing to prevent it from falling backwards on the shaft and out of it's hole in the can.

When soldering, you can do it a few ways.  You can tin both the bushing and the inside of the can, then assemble everything with the bushing almost fitting (the solder from tinning will prevent it from going all the way in), heat the can end quickly while applying a bit of pressure, and the bushing will pop right in.  You can also do it without tinning first, but in either case, the alignment "tool" is a simple way to avoid heating/reheating a couple of times to get everything right.  Another way to do it is just to solder the bushing in with no alignment.  Then install the "tool" afterwards along with the end bell, and even if it's slightly bound in the bushing because of some minor misalignment, you just reheat the can/bushing and the bushing will align itself because of the pressure pof the "tool".

The "tool" also works well when epoxying the bushing in.  You hold the bushing on the end of the tool and carefully apply epoxy around the edge of the bushing (or beating) with a toothpick.  Then, while holding the bushing upright on the end of the tool, drop the can down over the bushing watching to see that the bushing is "aimed" to come through the can hole.  After the bushing comes through the can, you hold onto the end of the tool coming through the bushing/can, and bring the end bell up from underneath to finish assembling the motor/end bell.  Now, you just place the tool and the can and end bell standing vertically with the can  on top and end bell on bottom onto an armature block in one of the shaft holes of the block.  Gravity will hold the tool against the inside of the bushing because the can wants to "fall".  Then you can either leave it all aside for the epoxy to cure, or place the whole thing into an oven to speed up the cure of the epoxy.  Of course, the end bell needs to fit snugly for this to work or it will fall out.  If it doesn't fit tight enough, you can either install two end bell screws or just rig up something else to make sure it stays put until the epoxy is set.

*A heavy bodied epoxy like JB Weld works well, because it wont run all over the place.  Thinner epoxies will get even thinner with some warmth and may also penetrate the bushing's pores (if it's an oilite) and foul it, preventing oil from charging the bushing when applying it later.

*For soldering bushings into a steel can, acid makes for a beautiful joint and the solder will really flow into all the tiny gaps, but you REALLY have to take time afterwards to neutralize any acid residue.  That means the entire can as well as the "tool".  A non-acid flux like "Nokorode" actually works well instead if the mating surfaces (the can inside and the bushing/bearing) are clean.

*For heat, general soldering practices are important here...meaning a lot of heat applied quickly, and then "get away" quickly as soon as the solder flows.  It's especially important here.  Too much heat for too long a time will cause any lubricants in the bushing or bearing to "cook" and become a gritty carbon.  You can do this all with a small torch better than a soldering iron...more heat and faster, getting the solder to flow before the lubricant cooks or burns.  Just apply the very small-but-intense torch flame to only the small area around the bushing.  If you DO still burn the oil, you can salvage a bearing by repeatedly spinning it after dipping in acetone or nail polish remover, the oiling it and spinning it.  You may have to do this a few times before it no longer feels "gritty" when turning it.  For a bushing "cooked" this way, it's best to discard it and try again.

 

-john


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#14 lucapgt

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Posted 20 December 2016 - 05:04 PM

Hi, I've started my project.For the endbell I prefer to use my mini lathe.

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Luca Baratti

#15 havlicek

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Posted 20 December 2016 - 07:07 PM

Hi Luca,

 

     I'm tickled to see you building this motor!  Also, you've done a splendid job!

 

-john


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#16 lucapgt

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 08:30 AM

Hi,

another step ahead...

Now I have to do the armature.

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Luca Baratti

#17 havlicek

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 08:46 AM

Hi Luca,

 

     That is a great looking motor!

 

-john


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#18 lucapgt

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 08:53 AM

Thanks! I'm copying from yours Works :-)

 

About the armature i think to make two different arm, one with 45T of 28gauge (from your suggestion) , the other one.... you know what i would try :-)


Luca Baratti

#19 havlicek

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 09:40 AM

Well...it just looks to me like you're making great use of some parts to scratchbuild a motor!  The two arms is a good plan, and while both will work, the big wire arm will be more difficult.  great work!

 

-john


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#20 olescratch

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Posted 27 December 2016 - 01:37 PM

Right on, scratch it!  Satisfies the "itch" almost every time!  Nice work!


John Stewart





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