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Seeking info on this blue King in WA


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#1 CruzinBob

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Posted 08 December 2016 - 03:11 PM

I am looking for info on a blue King for sale in WA. Track is from the Vancouver Raceway. It's in storage. I am in contact with owner who has pics but no builder info. From pics it looks to be a '90s Hasse. It has 2x4 tongue and groove (lap joint) construction and I don't trust 2x4's as they tend to move around some.

Any info would be appreciated.

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#2 Steve Ogilvie

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Posted 08 December 2016 - 10:06 PM

Hasse did not use tongue and groove joints on his early single bottom tracks. Neither did Ed Tunkel.

 

That looks like one of my very early Kings, judging by the legs that do not have adjuster slots and the joints that are not drilled and notched for individual section braiding.

 

Those are not 2x4s. Those joints were made with rough-sawn kiln-dried pine 2x10s that we machined in to joint pieces. The top joint overlaps slightly, effectively making it in to a double tongue and groove joint. If you look closely in the pictures you can see the overlap and also the MDF that is glued to the back side of each pine piece.They do not "move around."

 

The reason I stopped using pine for joints is that the stuff they started sending me just was not dry enough any more.

 

Where that track was originally, I have no idea. The separate drivers panel would have been added later and who knows what else was changed.


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#3 CruzinBob

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Posted 08 December 2016 - 11:17 PM

I do apologize! There's the difference in true knowledge vs hustler banter.

I'm afraid I can't see the details you speak of. I'll keep looking.

BTW, the value of the track just went up.


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Bob Scott
Cruzin' Mobile Slot Car Racing

Men can heal the lustful. Angels can heal the malicious. Only God can heal the proud. - St. John Climacus

#4 Ramcatlarry

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Posted 09 December 2016 - 12:38 PM

One Hasse oval that I worked on used no key on the butt ends and the track deck overlapped for alignment. A lot like my Miniature Grand Prix track - a 1960 open bottom track.

 

Ogilvie used 1/2" (usually two) MDF keys across the width. Dadds used one 1/4" aluminum or MDF (later) key which could be trimmed or replaced for sectional braiding. Many Ford tracks used no butt connectors, but had a tie/lap board to screw the section decks down to. 

 

Best to glue one side and use machine screws and T-nuts for the connector on those since the original drywall screws usually strip out.


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#5 Steve Ogilvie

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Posted 20 December 2016 - 11:34 PM

My early tracks were all single tongue tracks. I always used 1/2" MDF for the tongues.

I experimented a lot in the early days, trying to get a joint that would work well and not take too much time to make.This joint was fairly quick to make, but it had one major drawback: sometimes the glue would spread across the joint and it took a lot to get it apart and some splintering would take place.

That is when I came up with the 5" wide split top plate with another tongue lower in the pine. Eventually we (Brian Crosby and I working together) came up with the all MDF joint with split top plate mid-tongue and bottom offset plate, effectively a triple tongue and groove track joint. I never did invent something that worked the way I wanted to and was quick to make.

Another clue that this is a very early track of mine is the lack of drilled and slotted joints for individual braiding. We went in to modular track construction exclusively by about 1994.

Early Hasse single bottom tracks had no bolt-together joints at all, just an MDF plate screwed and glued under the section joints. When Fantasy Raceways in Rochester closed, I cut their track in to portable sections and put my joints in to it so it could be easily put back together. I do not know if that track ever got set up again or not.





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