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Vintage-style October 1968 Bat Pan


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#1 Steve Okeefe

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Posted 10 December 2016 - 07:18 PM

First in a series of vintage-style cars, chassis is patterned after a Bob Emott Batwinder circa October 1968.  Bob's chassis design is an architectural gem.

 

Bob Emott was in my opinion the Frank Lloyd Wright of chassis builders.  Your opinion may vary.  RIP, Bob.

 

The chassis:

 

Okeefe VS 6810 Bat Pan Top.jpg

 

Okeefe VS 6810 Bat Pan Bottom.jpg

 

I actually built this chassis several months ago when I was going to visit an old slot racing friend, and had put a ProSlot Super 16D in it.  I never got to run the car, but the more I looked at it, the more I thought it could handle a much more powerful motor.

 

So, I contacted John Havlicek, explained my idea, and he kindly built me this:

 

Havlicek D-can 25.jpg

 

It's a ProSlot setup with ball bearings and a 25 wire arm.  No vintage parts at all.  Will the EB hold together?  No one knows, but I'm not worried because I can easily get another EB.

 

The chassis is just brass and wire, but the running gear will be all modern parts also, nothing vintage.

 

I've asked Noose to do the paint for this one.  He said yes, and I really need to get back to him about picking out a body.  Any suggestions?  Remember, it's October 1968.

Oh yes, I almost forgot.  Here's a drawing of the chassis:

 

Okeefe VS 6810 Bat Pan Dwg.jpg

 

For the eagle-eyed, the plumber hinge in under the front axle.  I didn't want the sharp front end of the plumber rails to contact the track, and Steube was about to innovate putting the hinge in front of the front axle, so I picked a location under the axle.  One of those innovative design solutions.

 

It's Christmas season, so I'm going to be doing family Christmas things.  That plus a few days to get the body means you'll have to be a little bit patient about seeing this finished.  After all, it's not a racer and there is no race date.  :wink2:

 

 

 


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#2 Bill from NH

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Posted 10 December 2016 - 07:50 PM

Steve, can you also post the brass thickness of the pans & droparm, as well as the dia. of the main rails. I realize these three items might vary according to the track layout it was intended to run on.


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#3 Pablo

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Posted 10 December 2016 - 10:57 PM

I love everything about it :heart: :heart: :heart:  I'll bet Bob would say he loves the H motor :good:


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#4 Steve Okeefe

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Posted 10 December 2016 - 11:57 PM

Bill,

 

Certainly! 

 

Drop arm - .063"  Bob was using stamped Cobra drop arms at that time, and they were all .063".  Thinner drop arms (.050" and .040") came a little later.

 

Main rails - Inner .063" piano wire, outer .063" brass rod.  Use of brass rod and all .063" main rails would soon change though.  I believe Brady was already playing around with .055" piano wire main rails (and maybe even .050" drop arms) as early as August.

 

Side pans (actually Bat Pans) - .025" sheet brass.  I'm pretty sure Bob used this thickness on most if not all of his Batwinder chassis.  Thick enough to have adequate strength, but thin enough to allow tuning the chassis with lead on the pans.  I've often wondered why Bob seemed to place his side pan hinges (and body mount pin tubes mounted on top of the hinge pins) closer together than other builders designs.  I still don't know for certain, but I note it does result in there being more room  on the pans for the lead.

 

Hope that helps! :hi:



#5 havlicek

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 06:31 AM

Beautiful work Steve!   I guess the extra clearance a modern D motor has, made it possible to not need a notch on the rear axle tube?...or were the angles not as extreme on these as to make that necessary?  The drawing makes the motor box angle look steeper than later designs.  Last, were these things running plastic spurs?

 

-john


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#6 SlotStox#53

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Posted 11 December 2016 - 11:00 AM

Superb *vintage style* Steve :D

Love the look of Bob's *Batwinder* chassis every time I look at one. Pictures and your tech drawing added to a collection of your chassis drawings for future reference.

Motor is certainly in the spirit of the whole vintage style power in a modern (non unobtanium) abundant package.
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#7 SlotStox#53

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 11:29 AM

Finally able to attempt one of these and a 1969 race series car, what size jig wheels do you use for the 3/4 fronts and 7/8 rears with the 1/16 clearance Steve?

#8 tonyp

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 11:40 AM

I've often wondered why Bob seemed to place his side pan hinges (and body mount pin tubes mounted on top of the hinge pins) closer together than other builders designs. I still don't know for certain, but I note it does result in there being more room on the pans for the lead.

That's where the pins in his jig were. The chassis worked so he never changed it.

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#9 Noose

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Posted 30 December 2016 - 01:07 PM

We are going with a Mini Wheels Lola expertly recreated by John Dilworth.


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#10 grooverunner

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Posted 31 December 2016 - 11:27 AM

Paul,

 

That is what I did, I used my R-Geo jig wheels.

 

Ken


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