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A Christmas Walnut


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#1 havlicek

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Posted 25 December 2016 - 08:47 AM

     I got the call to do an FJ13UO-based Walnut, so I went digging through my "box-o-stuff" and came up with this little guy:

IMG_1882_zpsvfrvhmkx.jpg

 

The big-honkin' bushing carrier was already missing the rotating bushing, which made it a good candidate for getting the full treatment.  In this case though, the "full treatement" would not mean just reaming that out to install a fixed bushing or bearing.  The actual can without the carrier is about the same length as a C can, and with it...significantly longer.  So, if I'm doing a modern "vintage style" interpretation of a peanut and looking to make the little guy as compact as possible for an anglewinder installation, getting rid of the bushing carrier makes sense.

 

Soooo, here's the can after a whole buncha fiddlin'.

*After stripping, the bushing carrier got the axe, which leaves a HUGE hole in the back end of the can...like ginormous.  One way to fill that hole is to use the bushing strap from a C can, but there's a bunch of figuring-jigging involved with centering that so it can be fixed to the can.  After the fiddling, I silver-soldered it in place to test out some no-lead 4% silver solder I got.  Since I avoided breathing/twitching/blinking and slowed down my heart rate...the procedure went off successfully :D

The can also got shortened by just the length of the end bell tabs, which leaves about the same metal on both ends of the can holes.  That makes the can a bit shorter than a C can, and the bushing or bearing is now slightly recessed, so there's even a little less projection on the "business end".  Since the "13" is also very narrow, mounting anglewinder with a good angle shouldn't require a can notch.

IMG_1883_zpsilb2smoi.jpg

 

I also flattened the magnet-stop dimples, which turned out not to be necessary, but it sure ain't gonna to hurt N-E-Waze!

IMG_1884_zpsziertyxp.jpg

 

Of course, the motor's going to need a set of magnets, and instead of sourcing cobalts or something, "vintage style" makes things easier and cheaper to boot.  I just removed a set of the "poly neos" from a rusted old Falcon.  These need about .025" removed from both of the flats to get them to fit in the can.  The material is very soft, so the safest way to not have chunks fly off of them is to simply hold them by hand and play each one against a piece of (in my case) 220 sandpaper stuck on my glass table.  Checking/measuring as I go to see that I'm working fairly "in-square" and not removing too much, the process doesn't take THAT long, but working slow allows you to make little corrections as you go.

IMG_1885_zps5di7pe8l.jpg

 

Once the setup is done, I called my favorite armature dood, and went a little hotter than I normally do, and did me up a #27 wind (37/27) on a .400" long stack with a shortened com.  It's an easy fit in the Walnut, the magnets are plenty strong-enough and it will make for a heckuva stout  little motor!

IMG_1888_zpsyjgym2s2.jpg

 

Some spit and polish, along with an end bell (a PS minican end bell) that needed to have material removed from all four sides to fit and...a Walnut is born!

IMG_1887_zpsujq7cnoe.jpg

 

...in this case, I also switched out the 2mm x 6mm bushing for a bearing:

IMG_1886_zpsixovxiot.jpg

 

Of course, the arm needs to go out for grinding and balancing, but I can almost hear the "WHEEEEEEEE" of the motor spinning up already!

 

-john


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John Havlicek




#2 slotcarone

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Posted 25 December 2016 - 08:52 AM

:)  Another Masterpiece!!


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Mike Katz

Scratchbuilts forever!!


#3 SlotStox#53

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Posted 25 December 2016 - 10:40 AM

Sure one sweet vintage style motor John!! :D

Yet another take on the modern vintage parts mashup and some major can surgery in a similar way like the Kean can, lowered Mura A and others.
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#4 havlicek

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Posted 25 December 2016 - 01:27 PM

Thanks Mike and Paul!

 

 

 

 the Kean can, lowered Mura A and others. 

 

...among those the "Peanut" motors ;)

 

-john


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John Havlicek

#5 olescratch

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Posted 25 December 2016 - 08:15 PM

Another great build!  The treatment of the can bearing by using a strap is "scratch" to the Max. 


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John Stewart

#6 havlicek

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 08:58 AM

Thanks John.  With Steve Okeefe getting the ball rolling with his "vintage style"  build-ethic, I figure I'm stretching things, but still working in that arena.  When people think of vintage slots, I would guess that mist are thinking of the Mabuchi/Champion and early Mura motors, but hacking up Mabuchi 13UO cans and sticking a C can end bell on there is what I'm referencing here.  Going faster and making that speed with smaller motors is something that has continued up to today...but there are affordable and easy-to-get parts we can use today.  The smaller end bell and getting rid of that big bushung carrier, plus installing stronger magnets are naturals.  It's easy to just ream out the bushing carrier, but replacing it altogether is a little more difficult but results in an even more compact motor.  A short stack #28 wind is still a great choice here as well.  I could have gone with fewer turns of 28 wire, but I wanted to make an arm that would spin fast and still have good torque.  I've done this wind before on short stacks and it's fast for sure, but not ridiculous, and I think "similar" arms (sorta) are used for 1/32 inlines.  Here, the setup is just hammered together from some old/discarded stuff slot racers tend to throw away otherwise.

 

-john


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John Havlicek

#7 olescratch

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 12:21 PM

BTW, you stated earlier that the arm in this unit is a 37/27 .400 stack, did you change it?  No matter, it makes a strong, compact power-plant waiting to go!


John Stewart

#8 havlicek

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 03:04 PM

Hi John,

 

     :)  Sorry, I confused this motor with the Strapnut I just did.  Sometimes the old noggin needs floggin'!  :)

 

-john


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