Jump to content




Photo

A big Santa surprise


  • Please log in to reply
61 replies to this topic

#1 havlicek

havlicek

    OCD Rewinder

  • Subscriber
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,792 posts
  • Joined: 20-August 07
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NY

Posted 25 December 2016 - 01:33 PM

Well, it seems Santa and my kids collaborated and got me a neat-o Grizzly 4x6 micro lathe:

grizzly.jpg
 
Jeepers, my son asked me what I'm going to make... to which I replied: "well, while figuring out how to use it, I'll definitely be making lots of squiggly metal turnings"!
 
Good golly Miss Molly, a micro mill, drill press and a bandsaw and I'll be in business. What "business"? Well, the business of figuring out things to make that I never thought of making, as well as how make things by machine I used to make by hand. :D  

Anywho, I figure there will be a lot of learning, broken tools and cursing (I am a carpenter after all, and we have our own dialect), all of which sounds like fun.
 
-john


  • Jairus, slotbaker, hiline2 and 13 others like this
John Havlicek




#2 SlotStox#53

SlotStox#53

    Posting Leader

  • Subscriber
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,983 posts
  • Joined: 13-March 13
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:TX

Posted 25 December 2016 - 01:36 PM

Congrats! Oh the wondrous parts and goodies you can make with this :D Have fun!!!



#3 garyvmachines

garyvmachines

    On The Lead Lap

  • Subscriber
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 478 posts
  • Joined: 30-May 11
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Granite Planite - Granite City, IL

Posted 25 December 2016 - 02:10 PM

Hi John,

 

Looks like a sweet unit, for home... I need to get one now that I am going to retire. (I won't have use of the ones at work.)

 

People ask me all the time, what I do at work ? I say mostly make chips... We make more chips than parts... ha-ha.

Good luck... Ask???... Read books... Play with your new tool...

 

GAV


  • havlicek likes this
Gary Vogeler

#4 havlicek

havlicek

    OCD Rewinder

  • Subscriber
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,792 posts
  • Joined: 20-August 07
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NY

Posted 25 December 2016 - 02:45 PM

Thanks, guys.  

 

Gary, the size seems about right for the little doo-dads I might want to make. Since I have zero space for it, I got a small stand and can bring it out and set it up when in use. Weight seems good enough for being well-planted (around 30 lbs), but not nearly so heavy that I can't stick it somewhere.

 

 I also got a book from the same page that looks like a "Mini Lathe For Cretin Carpenters" kind of thing, some tooling and a chuck for the tailstock. Should be a "barrel of monkeys."

 

-john


John Havlicek

#5 Pablo

Pablo

    Builder

  • Subscriber
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,178 posts
  • Joined: 20-February 06
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Johnson Bayou, Mississippi Gulf Coast

Posted 25 December 2016 - 04:35 PM

Santa is the best!! :D


Paul Wolcott

#6 Booger

Booger

    Mid-Pack Racer

  • Full Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 110 posts
  • Joined: 15-June 15
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:SoCal

Posted 25 December 2016 - 04:39 PM

If you need something to read about little lathes... type in "7x lathe" in your favorite search engine...

 

"Little Machine Shop" will now become your friend...

 

Most of these types of lathes and mills are made by a company called Sieg...

 

Start here... mini-lathe.com...  :D

 

Ho! Ho! Ho! Have fun!


Gary "Booger" Baker

#7 havlicek

havlicek

    OCD Rewinder

  • Subscriber
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,792 posts
  • Joined: 20-August 07
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NY

Posted 25 December 2016 - 04:45 PM

Thanks, Gary!

 

-john


John Havlicek

#8 Steve Okeefe

Steve Okeefe

    We're all mad here

  • Administrator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,009 posts
  • Joined: 16-February 06
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Greencastle, PA

Posted 25 December 2016 - 09:13 PM

Hi John,

 

Wow... Santa was good to you this year!  :D

 

Find yourself a sturdy tray about an inch deep to set the machine in when you're using it (an ordinary lunch tray will do) - it will help catch and keep those "squiggly metal turnings" (and cutting and lubricating oil) from going absolutely everywhere - like sawdust.  Been using one for years - works great!


  • havlicek and Mach9 like this

#9 Bill from NH

Bill from NH

    Age scrubs away speed!

  • Full Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,917 posts
  • Joined: 02-August 07
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Boston, NH

Posted 26 December 2016 - 01:03 AM

John, you may end up with a larger investment in tooling than the cost of the basic lathe. That's what happened to me with the Unimat I bought in 1970. If you need a tray like Steve said, you could also look around at aluminum cooking pans, Some of them are tray-size with a low wall height. I have the Unimat mounted  on a three-piece laminated block of 3/4" plywood.with rubber feet for anti-skid.


  • havlicek likes this

Bill Fernald
 

How old should a highway be before you tell it, that it has been adopted?


#10 havlicek

havlicek

    OCD Rewinder

  • Subscriber
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,792 posts
  • Joined: 20-August 07
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NY

Posted 26 December 2016 - 06:49 AM

Will do, guys... thanks!

 

-john


John Havlicek

#11 Kim Lander

Kim Lander

    On The Lead Lap

  • Full Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 369 posts
  • Joined: 06-June 09
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Macon, GA

Posted 26 December 2016 - 07:54 AM

John....

 

You just don't know how much fun and use you will have with the lathe... you just opened another whole can o' worms so to speak... have fun, my friend.


  • havlicek likes this

#12 Mach9

Mach9

    Mid-Pack Racer

  • Full Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 164 posts
  • Joined: 27-June 12
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NC

Posted 26 December 2016 - 12:00 PM

Go ahead and find a spot for it, John. You're going to use it way more than you think!

 

And a mill will be next! Great Christmas present.


  • havlicek likes this

Mack Johnson
'86 Mustang footbraker
6.435 @ 104 MPH
NC Slot Car Tracks - Past and Present


#13 MarkH

MarkH

    On The Lead Lap

  • Subscriber
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 406 posts
  • Joined: 26-November 12
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:St. Louis

Posted 26 December 2016 - 01:18 PM

I have been in the Machining Industry for 36 years. This would be a fun little unit to have. Below are some thoughts.

 

Some basic rules:

1) Always wearsSafety glasses - God only gave us one set.

2) Always debur the parts.

3) Smaller diameters must be turned at a higher RPM to get the surface speed up for a good clean cut.

4) Use a live center in the tail stock when turning longer shafts of smaller diameters – it will keep the diameter consistent instead of the material pushing away from the tool pressure.

5) Never use a parting tool with the live center.

6) Never leave the chuck key in the chuck – you will forget and crash it into bed.

7) Never wear long sleeves that could wrap around the work or chuck.

8) The cutting edge of the tool should be at the center line of the material. Take a straight thin piece of shim stock or a 6" scale. Lightly press the cutting tip against the shim and the work. Look at the shim from the tail stock end. If the top edge of the shim is leaning away from center line you are too low. If it is straight up and down you are on center.

 

Recommended tools:

1) Good Micro Quick Change Tool Post – It makes it real easy to adjust the working height of the cutter and the tools will index back to their fixed location for repeatable tool changes.

2) Quality set of turning tools – Carbide inserts are good for most work. Sometimes HighSpeed steel cutters work better.

3) Get a Digital Readout - eBay and Amazon have inexpensive units. DRO-Pros have more expensive units but they also feature a diameter setting for the cross slide. The inexpensive units do not, at least that I have seen so far. So when you are cutting diameters you will have to divide the amount you want to take off by 2.

4) Center drills.


  • MSwiss, garyvmachines, olescratch and 1 other like this

Mark Horne

SERG - www.slotcarenduro.club
"Racing is life... everything else is just waiting." Steve McQueen - LeMans
There are only two things in life that make me feel alive. Racing is one of them.


#14 havlicek

havlicek

    OCD Rewinder

  • Subscriber
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,792 posts
  • Joined: 20-August 07
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NY

Posted 26 December 2016 - 03:03 PM

Hi Mark,

 

Thanks for the info.

 

A good chunk of that I understand already from working with power tools and even a comm lathe (regarding position of the cutter relative to center).  

 

The rest I'll definitely refer to!

 

-john


John Havlicek

#15 MarkH

MarkH

    On The Lead Lap

  • Subscriber
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 406 posts
  • Joined: 26-November 12
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:St. Louis

Posted 26 December 2016 - 04:09 PM

Have fun John. It is always interesting exploring new tools and methods. Your mind will run crazy with ides for new neat stuff as your skills increase.

 

I had another thought. Instead of DROs you might be better served with travel indicators. Just set them up square to the travel the cross slide and carriage slide. I am sure most of your parts will be relatively small so a 2" travel indicator for L-R and a 1" for the cross slide and you are ready. You will most likely need to fab some holder for them. If you digital on the indicators you can set zero and know exactly how far you are turning down the diameter length. iGaging offers some inexpensive options. With the DROs you need to mount the scales to the machine. It just needs to be square a parallel to the motion but can be a PIA.

 

There are off the shelf mag bases for indicators but they might put the indicator too high. Just something that needs to be looked at.


  • Mach9 likes this

Mark Horne

SERG - www.slotcarenduro.club
"Racing is life... everything else is just waiting." Steve McQueen - LeMans
There are only two things in life that make me feel alive. Racing is one of them.


#16 havlicek

havlicek

    OCD Rewinder

  • Subscriber
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,792 posts
  • Joined: 20-August 07
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NY

Posted 27 December 2016 - 08:17 AM

I'm told that the machine will most likely come with a heavy grease coating to protect it from corrosion that needs to be removed. If this is so, what's a good choice to do this? I see WD40 has a special product designed to do this and others that are environmentally friendly. I guess Simple Green might work also, but I'm worried about water-based products.  

 

Also, after cleaning, what's a good choice for general cleaning/lubing to prevent corrosion? So, you machinist-types, what do you use/recommend?

 

-john


John Havlicek

#17 lucapgt

lucapgt

    Rookie Keyboard Racer

  • Full Member
  • Pip
  • 13 posts
  • Joined: 01-September 16
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Italy

Posted 27 December 2016 - 08:45 AM

I have the same mini-lathe! 


Luca Baratti

#18 havlicek

havlicek

    OCD Rewinder

  • Subscriber
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,792 posts
  • Joined: 20-August 07
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NY

Posted 27 December 2016 - 08:47 AM

Neat!


John Havlicek

#19 olescratch

olescratch

    olescratch

  • Subscriber
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 723 posts
  • Joined: 19-July 13
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ravenna, OH

Posted 27 December 2016 - 01:32 PM

In regards to removing the heavy grease, mineral spirits is the answer. It will actually "thin" the grease while leaving a light coat of protection on the metal surfaces.

 

Now you have hit the point of "creation." It will be as interesting to see what develops from your mind in terms of ideas for parts to aid in the process.


  • havlicek likes this
John Stewart

#20 MarkH

MarkH

    On The Lead Lap

  • Subscriber
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 406 posts
  • Joined: 26-November 12
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:St. Louis

Posted 27 December 2016 - 05:18 PM

We would clean new machines with WD40 when possible. Sometimes that coating is real tuff and we would scrap with plastic putty knives. When it is all cleaned up, oil everything with proper lube and spray a protectant coat of WD40 on all the machined surfaces. Wipe down before use to removed the dust and crud that finds its way on to the machine.


  • havlicek likes this

Mark Horne

SERG - www.slotcarenduro.club
"Racing is life... everything else is just waiting." Steve McQueen - LeMans
There are only two things in life that make me feel alive. Racing is one of them.


#21 havlicek

havlicek

    OCD Rewinder

  • Subscriber
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,792 posts
  • Joined: 20-August 07
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NY

Posted 27 December 2016 - 05:23 PM

Thanks again, guys.  

 

I'm sure I'll be asking more questions and, just as in slot cars... it seems Slotblog is a good resource for figuring out machining!   :)

 

I'm sure I'll figure out loads of things to do with this little guy (eventually, I'd like to try making a can for instance), but even just making replacement bushings for Mabuchi end bells out of modern ones could keep the thing busy for a while.

 

-john


  • Mach9 and olescratch like this
John Havlicek

#22 John Streisguth

John Streisguth

    Johnny VW

  • Full Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,794 posts
  • Joined: 20-November 08
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bangor, PA

Posted 27 December 2016 - 05:50 PM

Check the operation manual, but most likely you will need a "way lube" (like Mobil Vactra) and also an oil for the bearings in the headstock and the leasd screws, which will typically be an oil like Mobil DTE. This is typically what's recommended for larger lathes. The way lube has a bit of tackiness to it, which helps a film stay in place.  

 

Most importantly, when you are done using it, wipe everything down (especially the ways) and relubricate. Nothing ruins the accuracy of a lathe faster then constant operation with fine bits of metal and other material constantly grinding away like a lapping paste.

 

McMaster-Carr is a good source. Maybe those mini-machine websites. (I order from McM almost daily, so I"m most familiar with them.)


"Whatever..."

#23 havlicek

havlicek

    OCD Rewinder

  • Subscriber
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,792 posts
  • Joined: 20-August 07
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NY

Posted 28 December 2016 - 06:21 AM

Thanks, John! I rarely go to McMaster-Carr onnacounta they seem to be high-priced. I should go and check them out again.

 

-john


John Havlicek

#24 MarkH

MarkH

    On The Lead Lap

  • Subscriber
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 406 posts
  • Joined: 26-November 12
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:St. Louis

Posted 28 December 2016 - 06:28 AM

McMaster can be a bit high but I have never received low quality stuff. Fast delivery and easy returns. Great place to find the 'hard-to-find.'


  • havlicek likes this

Mark Horne

SERG - www.slotcarenduro.club
"Racing is life... everything else is just waiting." Steve McQueen - LeMans
There are only two things in life that make me feel alive. Racing is one of them.


#25 havlicek

havlicek

    OCD Rewinder

  • Subscriber
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,792 posts
  • Joined: 20-August 07
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NY

Posted 28 December 2016 - 07:13 AM

Yep, whenever I did order from them there was never an issue at all with service.

 

-john


John Havlicek





Electric Dreams Online Shop