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Revisiting an old weird friend


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#1 havlicek

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Posted 08 February 2017 - 07:24 AM

For this project, I'm having another whack at an odd motor I haven't done in a few years. The motor is apparently a Johnson, made in Hong Kong, and the stock motor doesn't fit neatly into any of the familiar "size-families"... being smaller in most dimensions than either the 26D or the 16D, but taller (from bottom flat to top flat) than the 16D. Inside, there was a short stack arm using 26D-sized lams (.590" OD) and a set of very strong ceramic magnets measuring at or beyond "Arcos." 

The endbell is made from a very strong and quite heat-tolerant material that appears to be the same as what the Hong Kong Mabuchis were made from, but with an odd hardware and spring arrangement that's basically the same as the older Mabuchi FJ13UO, but with "vertical" brushes. To make things even weirder, there was a large brass rotating bushing carrier just like the Mabuchis, but with no groove for circlip mounting. Can material is thick, like the chrome 16D/26D Champions, but with what appears to be a gold zinc/chromate plating. Like I said, a very weird motor.

Here's a shot of the motor with the stock endbell. In this shot, I also turned the can sides on the lathe to clean them up. Why?... just because I wanted to see what that would be like. It's not something I will routinely do, now that I've tried it... but still, I got out alive.   :D  I also flattened the top, bottom, and rear on my glass work surface with some 220 and then 400 paper.

IMG_1973_zpsxpfxmlgr.jpg

I then made up another "doo-dad" bearing/bushing adapter for the can end, and finished it all off flush after soldering-in the doo-dad. This leaves about the same interior space as the stock motor had, and a much more compact exterior motor.  You can also see that the can came with some nice beefy threaded mounting holes, so this bad boy will definitely go "can-drive."

IMG_1974_zpswle1bsm8.jpg
 
On the inside, you can see that there's plenty of depth for mounting screw thread engagement, as well as the doo-dad soldered in place.

IMG_1975_zpsrjrlyfst.jpg
 
Here's a shot for size comparison with the Johnson in the middle, a Mabuchi 26D on the left and a Mabuchi 16D on the right. You can also see that I tossed the stock endbell hardware. I was able to get some Parma 16D hardware to fit after trying several options and that proving to be the closest to working of what I have. So now the motor is double overhead (or... double underhead :D ), and will use standard-sized horizontal brushes.

IMG_1976_zpswnts0f0t.jpg
 
Here's a shot of the can sides after turning on the lathe. Like I said, this isn't something I would routinely do, but the stock bushing carrier was just large enough for me to chuck the can. Taking really light cuts, the can proved to be pretty darned nicely formed and didn't take much to get it all smooth, even and neat-o.

IMG_1977_zpsf2btsins.jpg

With the very strong magnets sized so I could actually use 26D lams, I'll probably use the slightly smaller .560" D motor lams for less rotating mass. That will mean shims and epoxy, a fidgety and messy job, but I think it all will result in a better motor.  

Last, with only the one small hole on the one side only, I'll probably open up the two can flats with some more holes. The magnets are plenty strong, and the increased ventilation can't be a bad thing the way I see it. For a wind, on a short stack like this one (I'll have to experiment to see what length stack I can comfortably use here), I'm not going to go too hot, and probably will add some extra turns for whatever gauge wire I end up using, than I would use on a longer stack. I think the stack will be not too far off from the stock length of a 26D stack minus the fiber end insulators which don't do anything for the armature, other than avoid shorts.

It will all add up to a lot of work, but for a (hopefully) unique and fast motor built for slots, rather than whatever application it was originally intended for.
 
-john
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John Havlicek




#2 Pablo

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Posted 08 February 2017 - 10:35 AM

Old weird Johnson (OWJ).   :laugh2:  :good:


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Paul Wolcott

#3 Half Fast

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Posted 08 February 2017 - 11:55 AM

JH-

 

You sure have learned to use that lathe pretty quickly.  :victory:

 

Cheers.


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Bill Botjer

Faster then, wiser now

 

 


#4 havlicek

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Posted 08 February 2017 - 04:03 PM

Nah... even a half-blind carpenter could do the easy stuff I've done so far.  

Hey wait a minute... I am a half blind carpenter dadgummit! :D
 
-john
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John Havlicek

#5 olescratch

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Posted 08 February 2017 - 04:11 PM

Yeah! What Half Fast said.


John Stewart

#6 havlicek

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 10:30 AM

I got some more work done on this project. I set the can bearing so it's slightly more than flush on the inside for maximum tail-space on the arm. That allowed me to get busy and build the .560" arm stack and space it for the set-up. That prompted me to realize I needed a .590" slug to install the magnets. I didn't have one, but no problem, I made one up on the lathe.  Kind of a PITA, but I could keep working without ordering one and waiting, and now I have one.  

Last, I was told to make this a "one-hole" can by opening up the single itty-bitty hole and then duplicating that on the other flat. The can will get a clear coat of the VHT clear hi-temp stuff, so no polishing so as to provide enough "tooth" for the coating to adhere... hopefully!

IMG_1978_zpsjmbinvyk.jpg
 
-john
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John Havlicek

#7 old & gray

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 10:55 AM

That prompted me to realize I needed a .590" slug to install the magnets. I didn't have one, but no problem, I made one up on the lathe. Kind of a PITA, but I could keep working without ordering one and waiting, and now I have one.

 
Have lathe, tools and fixtures will accumulate. :)
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Bob Schlain

#8 havlicek

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 05:48 PM

 
Have lathe, tools and fixtures will accumulate. :)

 

Yep...and piles of squiggly metal shavings!


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John Havlicek

#9 havlicek

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 07:49 PM

I got the magnets and shims epoxied-in to set the hole at .590". After that I cleaned the can to prepare for it's clear coat. It's kinda hard to show the finished coating in pictures because... well... because it's clear. Anyway, it's a very cool effect!

IMG_1979_zpsxva3xfaj.jpg

IMG_1980_zpsfqadrbgm.jpg

IMG_1981_zpszkyodm1i.jpg
 
To make it even cooler, the coating seems like it might be quite durable and, like the other VHT coatings, is rated for very high temps.
 
-john
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John Havlicek

#10 boxerdog

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 08:53 PM

I think you are much more dangerous than you were before... must be the lathe!!
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David Cummerow

#11 havlicek

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 07:23 AM

Thanks, Dave. It is nice to be able to make things when you need them.  

On this particular motor, I think it's more about just plain old work. I probably spent as much time or more on this motor than most any I've done. It's all kind of silly when you think about it, so I try not to!   :D
 
-john
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#12 havlicek

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 12:27 PM

Every neat motor needs a neat armature. This one gets a #28 wind, and it meters dead-nuts perfect at .172 ohms

IMG_1983_zpsxrtwxpow.jpg

 

-john


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#13 gc4895

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 07:05 PM

How does the old adage go... "When you have a new mini-lathe, every project will require specialized, custom made bits and pieces". Or something like that.
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Mark Bauer

#14 havlicek

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Posted 11 February 2017 - 07:36 AM

Well, if that's true, I'll be in deep doo-doo when I get a mini-mill!
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#15 Kim Lander

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Posted 11 February 2017 - 08:40 AM

Nice-looking work, John.
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#16 havlicek

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Posted 11 February 2017 - 09:34 AM

Thanks, Kim!
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#17 havlicek

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 07:18 AM

Finally got some time to assemble this bad-boy, and it's fast...VERY fast, drawing a bit under 2 amps with no break-in.  The motor just feels very torquey and strong, spinning up and back in a "blip".

IMG_2023_zpswocm8yrf.jpg

 

-john


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#18 olescratch

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 02:27 PM

Nice!  Does it have a home yet?


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#19 havlicek

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Posted 25 March 2017 - 07:49 PM

Hi John.  Yes, this one was predestined!


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John Havlicek

#20 olescratch

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Posted 26 March 2017 - 11:53 AM

Very interesting power plant!  It just 'looks' full of torque.


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John Stewart

#21 havlicek

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Posted 26 March 2017 - 02:03 PM

Hi John...it feels that way too!  


John Havlicek





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