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Cabbage borsch


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#1 Cheater

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 11:40 AM

Or borscht, both spellings are used.

 

This is the first meal my ex-wife ever served me (and it really ramped up my interest in her!). Based closely on a recipe from the famous Grossinger’s resort in the Poconos, known as a key location in the so-called “Borscht Belt.”

 
The raisins plump up in the soup and when I first had it, I asked, “What kind of beans are these? I can’t ID them,” whereupon the ex started laughing uproariously.
 
Best cold-weather soup ever and the flavor is outstanding. We used to serve this at our sandwich shop to rave reviews.
 
Cabbage Borsch

 

2 pounds brisket

Beef bones

2 quarts water

2 onions, diced

3 cups canned tomatoes

3 pounds cabbage, coarsely shredded

2 teaspoons salt

½ teaspoon pepper

½ cup lemon juice

4 tablespoons sugar

6 tablespoons seedless raisins

 

Combine the brisket, bones, and water in a deep saucepan. Bring to boil and skim. Add the onions and tomatoes. Cover and cook over low heat 1 hour. Add the cabbage, salt, and pepper. Cook 1 hour. Stir in the lemon juice, sugar, and raisins. Cook 20 minutes. Taste to correct seasonings if necessary. Serve with the meat as garnish. Serves 6-8.

 

Notes:

We usually substitute 8 ounces of beef base for the beef bones.

We usually remove the brisket, chop it up, and add it back to the soup, rather than serve it as garnish.

This freezes really well. Our normal batch is three times the recipe.

Best made a day ahead and refrigerated so the fat solidifies and can be removed. Improves when reheated, like spaghetti.


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Gregory Wells

Never forget that first place goes to the racer with the MOST laps, not the racer with the FASTEST lap





#2 don.siegel

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 12:30 PM

Thanks, Greg; I'd like to say it sounds nostalgic, but my grandmother never made beef borscht, only beet borsht - and it was only served cold. (She also made a cold spinach borscht that's the most satisfying summer meal I've ever had!)

 

Many years ago, we had a neighbor whose family was Russian, and she made us a real Russian beef borscht that was absolutely delicious! With I had asked for the recipe... The only problem was, no sour cream in Paris (seems it's available now...). Only crème fraîche - and Lise gave us the secret: buy unpasteurized crème fraîche, put in a drop of lemon, leave near a radiator overnight and voilà - sour cream! 

 

Bon appétit! 

 

Don 



#3 Cheater

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 12:46 PM

Ooh, I'd love to have that cold spinach borscht recipe...


Gregory Wells

Never forget that first place goes to the racer with the MOST laps, not the racer with the FASTEST lap


#4 Zippity

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 07:52 PM

borscht
(also borsch)
noun

A soup made with beetroot and usually served with sour cream, associated with the cuisine of eastern and central Europe, especially Russia, Poland, and Ukraine.
 
 Let me see if I can find my Mother-in-Law's recipe and post it here for you. :)
 
Cabbage??!!
 
Yuk!!



#5 Cheater

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 08:01 PM

Just try it, Ron. You won't believe how good it is.

Gregory Wells

Never forget that first place goes to the racer with the MOST laps, not the racer with the FASTEST lap


#6 Zippity

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 09:06 PM

:)



#7 don.siegel

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Posted 11 June 2017 - 03:49 AM

Yep, cabbage can be very good - and you can store it a long, long time... of course, after a long Russian winter, I can imagine that they got a little tired of it! 
 
Greg, wish I had the spinach borscht recipe, too! I've tried recreating it a few times, and it wasn't bad, but not like what I remembered at my grandma's... of course, what is? I'll try again, and share with you... 
 
Don

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Posted 11 June 2017 - 08:24 AM

Yep, cabbage can be very good - and you can store it a long, long time...


Funny you should say that, Don.

Yeah, I know it's thread drift...

Before my maternal grandfather passed in 2011, one of the things I used to talk to him about was how food was stored before they had electricity, refrigerators, and freezers.

Here's how cabbage was kept.

When the cabbage was ready to be harvested, they would plow a furrow alongside the row of cabbages and line it with straw. Each cabbage would be cut from its root and placed in the second furrow atop the straw upside down, with the root end on top. When all the cabbages were cut and on the straw, they'd cover the lot with more straw and then cover the row of cabbages and straw with a decent layer of dirt. He claimed they would last all winter this way. When they wanted a head of cabbage, they'd uncover one from the end of the row and take it in to cook.


Gregory Wells

Never forget that first place goes to the racer with the MOST laps, not the racer with the FASTEST lap


#9 Ecurie Martini

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Posted 11 June 2017 - 01:13 PM

My mother and I lived with her parents while my father was in the service (WW II). In that household, the spinach variant was called "shav."

 

EM


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#10 don.siegel

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Posted 11 June 2017 - 02:03 PM

Great cabbage patch story, Greg. 

 

It was pointed out to me that Grossinger's was in the Catskills, not the Poconos... 

 

EM, we just called it spinach borscht, but that's probably the real yiddish word for it. 

 

Don 



#11 Cheater

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Posted 11 June 2017 - 06:35 PM

Thanks for the correction, Don and Bob. Not having spent a lot of time in the Northeast, my knowledge of the geography of that area is poor.


Gregory Wells

Never forget that first place goes to the racer with the MOST laps, not the racer with the FASTEST lap


#12 Zippity

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 05:29 AM

A Polish Borscht

 

Ingredients: 

  • 6 medium beets, scrubbed, divided
  • 6 cups low-sodium vegetable broth
  • 1 yellow onion, chopped
  • 2 teaspoons caraway seeds
  • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • Large pinch sugar
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh dill
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh chives

Method: 

Preheat the oven to 400°F. Wrap three of the beets in foil and place on a small baking sheet. Roast until tender, about one hour. Let cool, then unwrap beets and rub off skins with a paper towel. Halve and thinly slice.

Meanwhile, coarsely chop remaining three beets and place in a large saucepan. Add broth, onion, and caraway seeds. Bring to a boil, lower heat and cook at a gentle simmer for 50 minutes, or until broth is deeply coloured and beets are very tender. Strain broth and discard solids. Wipe out the pan, then return broth to the pan.  

Add reserved sliced beets to the pan and stir in vinegar, salt and sugar. Reheat if necessary and serve sprinkled with dill and chives.

Serve with a garnish of sour cream or yogurt and include pierogi-like dumplings.







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