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Resistance soldering... who's doing it?


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#1 gc4895

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 01:34 PM

I'm reading my latest Micro Mark catelog and I notice they are offering a resistance soldering set. That caused me to wonder, who is making their retro chassis or managing their flexi program using resistance soldering? Does this equipment lend itself to our use of soldering in the hobby? Does it work for attacking pinions or other delicate kinds of work? I have no experience with it and I was wondering if there was a quiet trend to replace our hot irons. Thanks!
Mark Bauer




#2 MSwiss

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 01:55 PM

Certainly not a trend I've heard of.

It's been discussed here, before.

http://slotblog.net/...oldering +brass
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Mike Swiss
 
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#3 gc4895

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 02:05 PM

Thanks for the link! I missed that before. I guess the real truth is it didn't exist in 1969 so that will certainly, as noted in the thread, prevent its use today in retro. Though, hold on, there was no Third Eye in '69 either and i don't read about racers trading in their defalcos for blue Cox thumb actuated devices. I must admit, that would give me pause since I have experience with the Cox 'troller and it's not a happy memory.
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#4 MSwiss

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 02:16 PM

The "not legal for Retro" comment was 100%, tongue in cheek.


Mike Swiss
 
IRRA® Components Committee Chairman
Five-time USRA National Champion (two G7, one G27, two G7 Senior)
Two-time G7 World Champion (1988, 1990)
Eight-time G7 King track single lap world record holder
17B West Ogden AveWestmont, IL 60559, ( 708) 203-8003
mikeswiss86@hotmail.com (also my PayPal address) 
Note: Send all USPS packages and mail to: 5858 Chase Ave., Downers Grove, IL 60516
Make checks out to Chicagoland Woodworking, Inc.


#5 havlicek

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 03:59 PM

While it "could" be used for building chassis, it would be a really inefficient way to do it.  Basically, you would have to connect the electrodes to the workpiece in such a way as the actual area you wanted to solder was between the two.  Also, the time the circuit is "closed" would be constantly changing depending on the thickness and the type materials being soldered.  This would limit the current path (*current heats up the metal between the (+) and (-) electrodes) so that only what you want to solder would be heated up enough for the solder to flow.  ***When I started brazing com connections, a task that IS well suited for resistance "soldering", I actually tried using brass and solder first to get a feel for it all, because I didn't want to waste commutators.  It quickly became obvious that:

1) The process can deliver a LOT of heat in a short amount of time.
2) It's best suited to precise and particular connections that can be repeated with minor adjustments.
3) Soldering with an iron may be an old process, but it's really well suited for chassis-building...MUCH more so than resistance soldering!


John Havlicek

#6 Ecurie Martini

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Posted 26 August 2017 - 04:23 PM

I use resistance soldering at least 50% of the time.  My unit is a commercial system that I picked up on eBay.  Between several connection choices and a multi-pole switch, it offers a wide range of power settings.  I have set it up with a large alligator ground clip, an electrode holder for 3/16" carbon electrodes and a foot operated on/off switch.  It offers several advantages:

 

It is easy to solder to large pieces of brass because it can deliver so much heat so quickly that it is a "local" event - no need to heat up the whole piece and risk melting previous joints.

 

There is enough heat to hard (silver) solder

 

The electrode can be filed to accommodate tight spaces

 

No need to wait for it to warm up

 

For "fiddly" jobs. you can hold a piece in place with the tip, turn it on, make the joint and then turn it off using the tip to hold the parts together until the joint cools (the tip has very low mass, cools instantly and will not stick to the soldered joint)

 

These same properties make it well suited for jobs like building up suspension detail that requires multiple joints in close proximity.

 

gallery_99_807_12498.jpg

 

EM


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