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Morgan Motor Company - this is how they do it


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#1 Cheater

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Posted 12 December 2017 - 06:13 PM

Not a modern automotive production process!

 


Gregory Wells

Never forget that first place goes to the racer with the MOST laps, not the racer with the FASTEST lap





#2 Pablo

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Posted 12 December 2017 - 07:19 PM

:heart: :heart: :heart:


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#3 Dave Crevie

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 03:40 PM

At first I thought that might be the episode from Discovery Science's "How It's Made" series, but it has been a long time since I saw that and I am not sure. I was particularly amused by the tour guide's comment that they paint the insides of the aluminum body panels to prevent them from rusting. 

 

The History Channel did a full hour show on Morgan in their "Ultimate Factories" series. Not sure what is so high tech about how Morgans are assembled. I had the opportunity to drive a flat rad +4 in anger at RA. Built with a Singer engine in it, no less. Cam-and-peg steering is such a thrill, since the car doesn't seem to know which way it wants to go. Driver input is unimportant.  


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#4 Cheater

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Posted 13 December 2017 - 10:35 PM

Dave,

 

I remember the HIM video and IIRC it was not the same as this one.

 

I've driven too many Moggies to actually like them... old ones are particularly unpleasant IMO. 

 

Just would like for once to be able to spend a few hours with a Morgan three-wheeler carrying one of the better engines. I suspect I'd like that experience better.


Gregory Wells

Never forget that first place goes to the racer with the MOST laps, not the racer with the FASTEST lap


#5 Ecurie Martini

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 12:24 AM

College classmate had one - I drove it a couple of times over some less-than-perfect roads in western Mass. My recollection is that it was a bit of a handful on those (vintage 1953-54) roads. 

 

I think the choice of wood for the body framing was wise. It needed that resilience to remain attached to the chassis. More recently I took a spin (not literally) in a Plus 8 belonging to a friend. It seemed a bit more forgiving. I'm guessing that this was tire effect.I doubt that the car was any heavier than the old flat radiator 4. The BOP V-8 is probably lighter than a vintage cast iron 4.

 

EM


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#6 Ecurie Martini

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 12:29 AM

Of course, Gus Andrey gave the AC-Bristols fits with his Triumph-powered Plus 4 but then, he was quite a driver.

 

EM


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#7 Dave Crevie

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Posted 14 December 2017 - 03:30 PM

Pat Starr often used to outrun my Europa, also with a full boogie TR-4 motor. He also replaced the cam-and-peg with

a Spitfire/Sprite rack and pinion. That car had a lot of SCCA history, regularly going to the runoffs. 

 

Greg, if you are over 5'8" tall and over 200 lbs., you won't get in a trike. Leastwise and still be able to shift. The push-pull

shifter will be obscured by your right leg. I tried driving a barrelback with a JAP back when I was 75 lbs. lighter. I was still

5'11" and my knees just fit under the cowl, but I could not move the shift lever because they were splayed out by the

steering wheel.

 

In the VSCDA, unmodified +4s are considered British verticals, and run with the pre-war cars. I like driving bare-bones,

rudimentary cars in which you feel every rattle, every crack in the pavement, and you can hear all the machinery. I enjoy

driving my 100/4 as much as my 914-6GT. I do not enjoy driving cars which in any way suppress the joy of going fast.







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