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#1 Dennis David

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Posted 15 December 2017 - 01:39 PM

I've been looking into 3D printing and CNC manufacturing for the past year and I am thinking of purchasing this machine.
 
It's the Rabbit Mill v3.0 out of Greece no less. I want to use it for my own hobby needs and in order to offset it's cost I am looking for anyone who is interested on wanting some small parts made. Those individuals should contact me directly. This is a light duty machine so aluminum, brass, wood, carbon fiber, and plastic. I am not looking at this as some kind of major income generator but rather as a hobby purchase, at least initially. If this works out I may upgrade to a five-axis mill in the future.
 
The one caveat is you would need to send me a file (software is free).

https://www.sourcera...ng-machines.htm
 
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#2 Ecurie Martini

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Posted 16 December 2017 - 01:50 AM

Have you looked at the Taig 3 axis CNC mill?  Complete with the highly rated Gecko controller they run about $1800 - How does this one compare delivered?  The Taig will handle 1/4 inch or larger cuts in steel!

 

As a long time user of machine tools, it is my observation that the cost of the tooling rapidly surpasses the basic machine cost.

 

EM


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#3 Dennis David

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Posted 17 December 2017 - 11:53 AM

The model I will probably end up getting is this one. The Taig is a traditional mill and will cut steel while the one I am looking at is limited to aluminum, brass and plastics which are the materials I will be using. The form factor is different and the table moves on the Taig where on the mill I am looking at its the spindle that moves along the rails. Of course this could be considered a weak point by some. The cutting area is different as well you can imagine.

Not sure about the weight but I would think 1/2 that of the Taig. As a machinist I would expect you would be drawn to the Taig. While someone coming from 3dp would be comfortable with the Rabbit Mill.

Some machines allow you to replace the spindle with a printer or laser tool. I suspect that will eventually be offered on this machine as well. So apples and oranges.

Let the milling begin !!!

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#4 Dennis David

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Posted 17 December 2017 - 12:02 PM

Since I have specific needs my tooling costs should be minimal except for good quality cutters but material costs need to be considered as I look to source materials. Right now I am considering http://www.onlinemetals.com because their ordering procedure looks the best for my purposes.
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#5 Dennis David

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Posted 17 December 2017 - 12:06 PM

Also important is having resources to help you and I have been talking to Sandy Grant who has done many of the same projects I intend to do. As I stated earlier if anyone is interested in trying out my machine, albeit from long distance, drop me a line. It’s very easy to send me a file and the software is free.

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#6 Ecurie Martini

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Posted 17 December 2017 - 02:16 PM

I have used Online Metals.  They are a good supplier.  I look to them particularly for nickel silver.  Nickel silver is, like brass, a copper alloy.  It solders well, is stronger than brass (but much easier to cut than steel) and has a silver color which may be important for some applications - brass is notoriously hard to paint.  I'm using it at the moment to make some suspension bits that need to be soldered,

 

I looked up the unit you referenced but could find no specs on resolution, accuracy, repeatability or the maximum tool size the chuck/collet could accept.  These would be important factors.

 

An application that I can see:  Both our local group and some of the proxy races I enter have classes with strict, low power motor specs.  From what I have observed, in these instances, lower  weight  leads to better finishes.  I've looked at several approaches including the use of 3D printed chassis parts (although I really prefer to "roll my own") and, most recently, 1/16" birch plywood.  This material, made up in a "U" section approximating typical chassis dimensions, is very strong.  Cutting and drilling it is easy but time consuming.  (Homage to the PT boat, Mosquito fighter, Marcos sports car and my 17' cold molded ply racing dinghy)

 

EM


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#7 Dennis David

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Posted 17 December 2017 - 04:30 PM

Alan, this is what you want. This is the mill I would get if I had a proper workshop and a bigger budget.


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#8 Dennis David

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Posted 25 December 2017 - 11:36 AM

Third-party 4th axis. Tormach will have their own option as well.


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#9 Ecurie Martini

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Posted 25 December 2017 - 12:34 PM

Yes, Tormach is definitely the leader in small CNC machines - at triple the price (and weight) of the Taig unit.  The funny thing is, if one had the space, like an unused garage bay or a small barn, a used Bridgeport mill can be had for less.  I learned basic milling operations on such a mill in the department workshop while in graduate school.  It made quick work of projects like this:

 

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EM


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#10 Dennis David

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Posted 25 December 2017 - 12:39 PM

I like the form factor of the Tormach but I understand the allure of the Bridgeport mill.

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