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Wanted: Radio Shack silver-bearing solder 62/36/2


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#1 John Gorski

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Posted 26 December 2017 - 11:43 AM

Anyone have any rolls of Radio Shack silver bearing solder 62/36/2 part #64-013?

 

IMG_6989.JPG


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#2 Dan Ebert

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Posted 26 December 2017 - 11:49 AM

John,

 

Kester carries the same thing. I am thinking the Radio Shack brand may be the Kester repackaged.


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#3 Cheater

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Posted 26 December 2017 - 12:06 PM

John,

 

This solder formulation is commonly called 'Sn62.'

 

Google 'Sn62 solder .022' and you'll find lots of it, mostly in larger rolls.


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#4 John Streisguth

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Posted 26 December 2017 - 01:02 PM

McMaster-Carr has 1 lb spools, .025" diameter. It's not exactly cheap.


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#5 Cheater

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Posted 26 December 2017 - 01:24 PM

John,

 

Surely there's a hobbyist electronics store somewhere near you in NJ. I'd bet most of them will have Sn62 solder in smaller rolls.


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#6 old & gray

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Posted 26 December 2017 - 01:49 PM

McMaster-Carr has 1 lb spools, .025" diameter. It's not exactly cheap.

 
Interesting, I checked Mouser. 1 lb. .025 dia
 
Activated rosin wire solder - $105
Rosin mildly activated - $37
 
Personally I prefer solid core.
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#7 tonyp

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Posted 26 December 2017 - 03:29 PM

eBay around $25 to $30 a roll last time I bought a 1 pounder.


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#8 Craig

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Posted 27 December 2017 - 01:18 PM

Personally I prefer solid core.


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#9 Cheater

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Posted 27 December 2017 - 01:22 PM

Why, may I ask? Just to be able to pick your own flux?


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#10 old & gray

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Posted 27 December 2017 - 01:52 PM

After I clean a part, I apply flux to prevent oxidation. The oxidation happens more rapidly with the addition of heat.

If I'm bringing in the solder on the iron then the flux is moot. If I'm heating then applying solder, the flux isn't there for the oxidation, only to improve the flow of the solder.
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#11 Cheater

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Posted 27 December 2017 - 01:59 PM

OK, I can see that, although I almost never would apply the solder to the iron, only to the heated parts to be joined. And I'm not 100% in agreement with this statement: "If I'm heating then applying solder, the flux isn't there for the oxidation, only to improve the flow of the solder." The flux proceeds into the joint before the solder and I feel does ''lift' any minimal oxidation that might have occurred since the parts were meachincally abraded to expose clean metal.

 

And I almost always tinned everything first. For me, that procedure made for stronger, longer-lasting joints.


Gregory Wells

Never forget that first place goes to the racer with the MOST laps, not the racer with the FASTEST lap


#12 old & gray

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Posted 27 December 2017 - 09:54 PM

As I consider the flux liquefying before the solder, it would coat and clean the joint and flux will remove some oxidation.

 

The method of touch the solder and bring the solder to the part on the iron was the way I used to install motors in wing cars (group 12 C cans). One hand holds the motor, the other applied the acid, then grab the iron, touch the solder, and hit the joint. (Always wipe the iron before attaching the leads.)

 

 I had not thought of using that method to build a chassis until it was suggested by Mike Katz.


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#13 MSwiss

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Posted 27 December 2017 - 10:53 PM

I like solder with a core because it will tend to stick to the tip better..

 

I always flux the area and hit the joint with the iron with the solder on the tip, like you said, like installing a motor in a wing chassis.

 

The reason, with solder on the tip you get better heat transfer and all work you do can be accomplished quicker/less heat to the metal.

 

Heating the area and feeding in the solder in, I think is senseless.

 

I think that's more of a brazing deal, or soldering, if you are using a torch/flame.

 

To feed in the solder, along with the already mentioned, heating up the metal more than needed, also entails possibly having a nearby, previous joint melt, and have a part move out of place.

 

And you are also losing your "hold-down hand". 


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#14 Ramcatlarry

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Posted 28 December 2017 - 12:18 AM

With solid core, you provide the flux of choice. Most buy rosin core flux and mixing it with acid flux might be a joint weakening contaminant.


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#15 NY Nick

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Posted 28 December 2017 - 04:29 PM

I found a radio Shack in Yonkers.


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#16 Dallas Racer

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 07:35 PM

What's the preferred solder for chassis building? I thought that most builders opted for 60/40.

 

And if you use silver solder, what's your preferred % of silver? I've always used silver solder for chassis building that I bought at slot car tracks. I think it was 3%, maybe even 4%, but I'm not sure.


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#17 Greg VanPeenen

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 08:28 PM

I like solder with a core because it will tend to stick to the tip better..
 
I always flux the area and hit the joint with the iron with the solder on the tip, like you said, like installing a motor in a wing chassis.
 
The reason, with solder on the tip you get better heat transfer and all work you do can be accomplished quicker/less heat to the metal.
 
Heating the area and feeding in the solder in, I think is senseless.
 
I think that's more of a brazing deal, or soldering, if you are using a torch/flame.
 
To feed in the solder, along with the already mentioned, heating up the metal more than needed, also entails possibly having a nearby, previous joint melt, and have a part move out of place.
 
And you are also losing your "hold-down hand".

 
I am afraid to say it, but Swiss is correct once again.
 
GVP


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#18 olescratch

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Posted 29 December 2017 - 09:27 PM

I'm no expert, but I watched one at work in a video (Tony P)! Until I followed his steps, I wasn't the least bit happy with my soldering.  

 

Just to make it clear, I haven't posted any of the pics of my cars using this method. So looking to see what it looks like isn't possible yet.

 

I use Sn62 and brush on acid flux.


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#19 Dallas Racer

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Posted 30 December 2017 - 01:57 PM

I watched Tony's videos too, but as I remember the volume was really low and I had a hard time understanding what he was saying.

 

I thought I read a thread where more than one poster said they used 60/40 because silver solder was brittle and fatigue cracked, which I have experienced myself a time or two. But when I started racing in the '80s (I only raced one time as a kid) I initially bought a Parma RTR Group 12 car. It quickly fell apart and I was told by Pat Paris, who I learned a lot from, that it was assembled with 60/40 and I needed to rebuild it with silver solder, which I did. I've used silver solder ever since.

 

Tony, I'll take your recommendation and get some Sn62.


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#20 Bill from NH

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Posted 30 December 2017 - 03:17 PM

A silver-soldered chassis will be stiffer than one built with 60/40. It'll take two or three races to "race-work" and obtain its proper flex. If you need more detail on this, Foamy, at BPR, is a good one to talk to. 

 

Sn62 is also available in paste form that sometimes comes in handy when chassis building. My favorite solder was/is 63/37 because it is eutectic.


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#21 Jesse Gonzales

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 11:41 PM

Back in the '60s and early '70s guys like Dave Fortner, Neil Kuhns, and myself used Harris Stay-Brite. With AZ tracks being notorious for launching in the bank we used what stayed together after a wall blast or worse.

 

I first met Pete Zimmerman after we met just ahead of the bank on an American orange.



#22 Tom Eatherly

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Posted 06 January 2018 - 10:46 AM

Meeting Zimmerman under any circumstance was, uhh, always interesting.

 

Back to topic. Sorry.


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