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Very old school machine shop


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#1 Half Fast

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Posted 28 March 2018 - 06:50 PM

Dagnabbit you younguns don't know what a real machine shop looks like. No software glitches here. Water power and leather belts!
 

Knight Foundry -- Historic Water-Powered Belt-Driven Machine Shop

 

So there!

 

Cheers,


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#2 Samiam

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Posted 28 March 2018 - 06:57 PM

Yeah... what happens when there's a drought? :D


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#3 Half Fast

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Posted 28 March 2018 - 07:12 PM

Ummmm.. I didn't think of that! :unknw: 
 
Spoilsport!
 
Cheers

Bill Botjer

Faster then, wiser now.

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#4 Phil Hackett

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Posted 28 March 2018 - 07:54 PM

Get out the horse and tie him to a shaft and have him walk in circles chasing the carrot and when the horse gets tired use the cow. :D If you don't have animals, use an old-style farm windmill.


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#5 slotbaker

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Posted 28 March 2018 - 08:18 PM

Yeah... what happens when there's a drought? :D

 

Ya get ya steam-powered traction engine out...

 

:huh:


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#6 Cheater

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Posted 29 March 2018 - 10:06 AM

That Knight shop could have been in someone's backyard or barn. 

 

Here's a serious machine shop:

 

fms.jpg


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#7 Ramcatlarry

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Posted 29 March 2018 - 11:00 AM

Basically it is in the historic 'time frame'...

 

Pre- steam power. Before about 1850. All shaft-driven tools are run by animal or water power forces.

 

1850-1900 introduces steam power to replace the water power still using the central shaft in the ceiling system utilizing buffalo leather belting to drive the machines. This allows manufacturing to be away from the local river water sources.  Small locomotive engines become the primary source of heat and steam to power rotary shafts.

 

1900-1960 developments of electrical powers allows small electric motors to power the same tools with each machine having its own motor.

 

1960-2000 enters into the automated tool timeframe with robotics and numerical control.

 

I learned to run a lathe on one that was a survivor of the pre-1900s.


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#8 Phil Hackett

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Posted 29 March 2018 - 11:18 AM

Sonic's first machine was a Brown & Sharpe #0 screw machine. It was built in 1915 and was a lineshaft driven machine. It had an overhead adapter with a gearbox and electric motor. The spindle belt flapping around and the general sketchiness of the whole thing was one reason it left ASAP when we finally had money to buy something more modern. The machine required awareness when working around it. Plus you got to know about flat leather belts, flat-belt pulleys, lacing tools and all sorts of old stuff... OSHA wouldn't have approved.


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#9 Mike Patterson

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Posted 29 March 2018 - 09:01 PM

I admire all the engineering expertise involved in the design, production, and layout of the old equipment. To me, AutoCAD pales in comparison. But then, I'm a draftsman. Old engineering drawings are often pieces of art in their own right, a concept that I attempted to continue as long as I could.


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#10 Dave Crevie

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Posted 30 March 2018 - 12:38 PM

By the way, the water wheel shown is commonly called a Pelton wheel, and is used when the shop is not near a running stream.

I cut the tires for a Shay locomotive on a wheel lathe similar to the one shown with the bevel gear mounted up. It had been converted to electric power way back when, but still used the leather belt to drive it. One of the tool shops I worked for had a Hendey lathe with flat belt drive, but it had been converted to electric before the first World War when it had been used to make artillery shells.

South Bend built lathes with flat belts into the '70s.





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