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A "More PS" rebuild of a PS motor ;)


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#1 havlicek

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Posted 31 March 2018 - 11:48 AM

     So here's another PS minican rebuild, and all that involves:

1) Complete strip and clean
2) New end bell bushing, with the end bell drilled and the new bushing keyed to the plastic with hit-temp epoxy

3) New can bushing installed, epoxied-in place
4) All the hardware cleaned, flattened, and the interior clearanced for the wider com, reinstall

---then time for a new arm---

     This time, I used some of the really skinny profile PS lams, like those used in the "Puppy Dog" arm I had lying around for some time now.  These have a thin winding leg, a full crown and zero "hub" section back towards the shaft, with a tiny "triangle" functioning as a wire-stop.  The triangle, unlike either a round of diagonal is a "hard stop"...you CAN NOT wind past the triangle, turns will not slightly "climb" up as they can with a "hub".  The good news is that this design absolutely maximizes the available space for winding.  The bad news is that you may have "too much space" for some winds, and you can't do some things you might want to do.  The back end of the coil...closest to the com...pretty much must keep stepping-in as you finish each layer.  On a six layer coil, the last turn on the top layer winds up pretty far away from the com and that presents the risk of your coil/pattern falling apart at the last minute = "no bueno"!

     So I worked out a pattern for a 50/29 on these lams, stuck on a tag and did the deed.  It should make for a pretty zippy mini.  Will it work better or not as good as a more typical lam?  Beats me!

IMG_2641.JPG


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John Havlicek




#2 Alchemist

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Posted 31 March 2018 - 11:58 AM

Hi John,

 

Your windings look like they are machine wound - so perfect!

 

It makes it difficult to believe you do these by hand John - awesome!

 

 

If I may ask you please, when you receive older/used/dirty motors to rewind, when you strip and clean them up prior to "reworking" them, do you employ a sonic bath?

 

What do you use to clean them please?

 

Thank you John!

 

Ernie


Ernie Layacan

#3 havlicek

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Posted 31 March 2018 - 12:37 PM

Hi John,

 

Your windings look like they are machine wound - so perfect!

 

It makes it difficult to believe you do these by hand John - awesome!

 

 

If I may ask you please, when you receive older/used/dirty motors to rewind, when you strip and clean them up prior to "reworking" them, do you employ a sonic bath?

 

What do you use to clean them please?

 

Thank you John!

 

Ernie

 

 

Hi Ernie, and thanks again.

Honestly, and I don't know how else to say this without sounding bad, but what I aim for is not "machine wound"...but "better than machine wound".  Just machine wound arms can be pretty sloppy looking.  CNC wound arms usually look much better, and I try to get them better than that if possible.  *I think* the potential (not for sure always) advantage of hand winding has to do with being able to vary how much tension you use, and at what points when building a coil.  Sometimes you really want to yank on that thing, but then you need to let off a little at certain spots/places, so you wind up with a tight/consistent coil that's physically stable.

I don't use a sonic cleaner at all Ernie.


John Havlicek

#4 Jaeger Team

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Posted 01 April 2018 - 03:00 AM

Hand wound = haute coutre
Machine wound = ready to wear
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Maurizio Salerno

#5 Alchemist

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Posted 02 April 2018 - 01:37 PM

Hi John!

 

 

 

 what I aim for is not "machine wound"...but "better than machine wound". 

 

My apologies John,

 

I meant no insult when I mentioned "machined wound" - I meant to imply how "exceptionally and perfectly consistent" your winds look.

 

I've not seen very many "sloppy machine winds", but then I am not exposed to many different motors like yourself.

 

I really appreciate the level of craftsmanship you make an effort to pursue.

 

Thanks again

 

Ernie


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Ernie Layacan

#6 havlicek

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Posted 02 April 2018 - 03:33 PM

Hi Ernie,

     Geeze...don't be so polite!  I appreciate the kind words, and all I meant by that is I don't really look at other armatures and try and "best" them.  There was a time that I did, but now I'm my own worst critic.  

***As for the sloppy machine wound arms, before CNC winding, most all regular commercial armatures were wound using some sort of "machine".  The nice commercial arms you see today are wound using much better equipment (*unless they're specified as being "hand wound").  Regular modern "Asian" arms are done on a machine, and while they're certainly good, and make for an excellent value, you get what you pay for!  :D


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John Havlicek





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