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A minican done like it's a 'maxican'


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#1 havlicek

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Posted 04 April 2018 - 12:55 PM

Got into this one, and for some reason I just kept going.  After disassembly, I:

1) Gave everything the old elbow + grease.
2) Loaded the can in the mill and flattened the top, bottom and bushing strap.
3) Exterior sides and inside all got hit with various grinding bits.  THIS motor is clean!
4) Bearing installed in the can.

Took apart the end bell and:

1) Cleaned/flattened everything up

2) Drilled the end bell to "key"-in a bearing with epoxy

3) Installed all the hardware after clearancing, with button head screws

Now I just have to decide between ceramics and polyneos.  For now, I set it all aside so as to give me time to ruminate on the arm, because that might help make the magnet decision!

IMG_2656.JPG


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John Havlicek




#2 team burrito

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Posted 05 April 2018 - 01:43 AM

go with the ceramics for normal production arms, neos for eurosport-type winds.


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Russ Toy (not Troy)
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International D3 Builders Competition

#3 havlicek

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Posted 05 April 2018 - 06:02 AM

go with the ceramics for normal production arms, neos for eurosport-type winds.

 

Well Russ...I went a different way.  I did a reverse wound 38/27 on a .350" long stack, and used the ceramics, which will get a fresh zap-aroonie!  :D

***Interesting thing here is that, this wind done "conventionally" on these lams winds up being a 6-layer coil with the last turn away from the com.  Winding from the outside in, it makes for a super tight and compact 5 layer coil.  Winding this way also allows for almost full tension on all five layers and at both the outside and the inside of each layer...I mean, you can really yank on that thing without trying to avoid the coil ends from collapsing.

Here, I took a photo before tying and epoxying to show a little more detail about this wind method.  The way the wire ends up at the com looks a little weird, almost like a "hemi" sorta.  I think it's a good "tool" to have in your mental "winding rolodex" for times like this, because it doesn't *just* make odd-layer-coils easy, but it also makes for REALLY tight layering.

IMG_2657.JPG


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John Havlicek

#4 havlicek

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Posted 05 April 2018 - 01:42 PM

The arm is done and ready for grind/balance.  Resistance measures .128Ω, which puts it firmly in light-flickering territory.

IMG_2659.JPG

A last test-fit in the setup...just to be sure, especially since I spaced this one for minimal washers:

IMG_2658.JPG

...and all is golden (sometimes I get lucky!)


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John Havlicek

#5 Geary Carrier

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Posted 05 April 2018 - 02:29 PM

You made that luck, with a bunch of work and rigorous rumination...

 

Oh, and this is gonna fly!


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Yes, to be sure, this is it...


#6 Steve Deiters

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Posted 05 April 2018 - 03:03 PM

After applying epoxy do you put your arms in a vacuum chamber?



#7 havlicek

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Posted 05 April 2018 - 04:10 PM

After applying epoxy do you put your arms in a vacuum chamber?

 

No Steve, and it's absolutely unnecessary.  I have a "system" for epoxying my arms and have actually cut them apart to check, and I get full penetration of the coils.  This is a whole subject in itself, but I've worked my way through epoxying to get good results, and it's not as simple as it would seem...but neither is it as complicated as setting-up a vacuum system.


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John Havlicek

#8 Alchemist

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Posted 05 April 2018 - 04:53 PM

Hi John,

 

This motor, to me, is a "Transformer": that is "powerfully transformed!

 

post-688-0-35659400-1522953698.jpg 

 

Purposely built - excellent work John!

 

Ernie


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Ernie Layacan

#9 havlicek

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Posted 05 April 2018 - 09:21 PM

Thanks Ernie!  :)


John Havlicek

#10 olescratch

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Posted 06 April 2018 - 12:53 PM

Mr. H, I notice that you seem to try and obtain a specific amount of winds for different arms.  Is there any specific amount of winds established to make an arm a specific type ie G12, G7, etc.  If so, where can this information be found?  I ask because it would seem that if you wind until you get back to the com, the reverse winding may not be needed.  If you think this is a drift, please respond in a pm.


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John Stewart

#11 Half Fast

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Posted 06 April 2018 - 01:19 PM

Its a "Mad Maxican" :shok: :)
 
Cheers

Bill Botjer

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The most dangerous form of ignorance is not knowing that you don't know anything!

 

 

 
 

#12 havlicek

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Posted 06 April 2018 - 01:40 PM

Mr. H, I notice that you seem to try and obtain a specific amount of winds for different arms.  Is there any specific amount of winds established to make an arm a specific type ie G12, G7, etc.  If so, where can this information be found?  I ask because it would seem that if you wind until you get back to the com, the reverse winding may not be needed.  If you think this is a drift, please respond in a pm.

 

Hi John,

     I often go for winds that people are familiar with, that way they can sort of predict where the motor will fall in the performance range.  50/29 is an old and established wind for group 12 motors.

     Then again, I have a fairly good idea how different winds will work (*I wrote them all over my winding crank base over the years, with resistance readings of each...the thing is a real mess with all that scribbling).  

     When you say "reverse winding may not be necessary", you're partly missing the point.  Reverse winding not only allows me to get to certain specific winds...it also has some real benefits over conventional winding:

1) It can help keep the last turn nearer to the com, which avoids some hassles.

2) It produces repeatable and really tight-strong-compact coils.
3) It can sometimes make a normally-6-layer coil into a 5 layer coil, which is really helpful on short stack arms where the tops of the coils are so near the com tabs, you have be careful not to scorch the wire when brazing.

***So, reverse winding isn't something I would avoid at all if I could.  Neither is it always appropriate.  I generally stick to three basic types of winds, conventional winds, reverse winds and occasionally "hemi" type winds (*although not often at all anymore).  It has been a really good "discovery", and after refining it a little to avoid stressing the wire, pretty much a homerun!


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John Havlicek





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