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Help ID Vintage 1/32 body and chassis parts


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#1 tjallen

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Posted 28 June 2018 - 10:38 PM

I would like help identifying the body and chassis parts of this vintage Ferrari f1 slot car. I recognize the Classic motor and the 1965-ish Ranalli Rudder pickup guide. The motor bracket is attached to the motor with a C clip.

 

I am most intrigued that this car has, functionally, a drop-motor design, with the pivot point at the rear axle.

 

ferrari_4030.JPG

 

ferrari_4016.JPG

 

ferrari_4018.JPG

 

ferrari_4009.JPG

 

drop-motor_4014.JPG

 

flag_4029.JPG

 

Thanks for any help!


Jimmy Allen




#2 Bill from NH

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Posted 29 June 2018 - 05:35 AM

That's a fine looking vintage car  Jimmy, but not something I've seen before. Perhaps Matt Bishop will chime in.


Bill Fernald
 

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#3 Mattb

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Posted 29 June 2018 - 07:33 AM

It doesn't look like any American product I know of,except the Classic motor,    Maybe Don Siegel can add some info, or Phillipe if he has time to come here.


Matt Bishop

Vintage Cox Slot Cars

#4 Jaeger Team

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Posted 29 June 2018 - 09:50 AM

I guess it is scratchbuilt
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Maurizio Salerno

#5 Dave Crevie

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Posted 29 June 2018 - 11:20 AM

The body is a Ferrari 156F1. As to the chassis? It might be something someone machined, but the finish looks

die cast. I don't remember having seen one of these back in the '60s.


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#6 jokar124

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Posted 30 June 2018 - 07:52 AM

tjallen, what is the material of the front bracket?  To me, it looks like it was hand cut from an aluminum angle extrusion.

 

The rear bracket might be more telling as to origin but it is hard to see much from the photo.


Jo Salvaterra

#7 don.siegel

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Posted 30 June 2018 - 08:22 AM

Pretty sure that's a homemade job, just adapting the Classic rear bracket and bending or machining a front mount. 

 

Interesting, because it's a "monocoque" design in the slot sense of the term, without any real chassis. MPC offered this iso type option on their Indy roadster, by blocking the drop arm and letting the whole thing hinge from the rear axle holes; and it also used bearings directly in the body for the front wheels - saving weight, just as cars were getting heavier to handle the hairier motors! 

 

Nice find Jim. 

 

Don 


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#8 tjallen

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Posted 01 July 2018 - 04:08 PM

A couple extra pictures.

Yes, on closer inspection, that front guide tongue must be home-made, from aluminum.

 

ferr406x.jpg

 

Here is the C-clip attached rear axle bracket:

 

ferrari_4066.JPG


Jimmy Allen

#9 Mattb

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Posted 01 July 2018 - 04:49 PM

It is a good job for home made.    I figured it was something from Europe or even behind the iron curtain!


Matt Bishop

Vintage Cox Slot Cars

#10 Bill from NH

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Posted 01 July 2018 - 04:54 PM

This chassis is well-made, no matter who built it. The monocoque design would also be a very good starting point for someone who wants to build an ISO chassied sportscar. Jimmy, do you recall if you got this car somewhere in the US or overseas?


Bill Fernald
 

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#11 tjallen

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Posted 02 July 2018 - 11:07 AM

Checking my old ebay emails (Dec. 2002), I believe it came from Iowa. I didn't print the auction out - too bad we can't call up the old auctions, what a resource that would be!

 

It came from the same seller as these chassis, which would explain the aluminum.

 

If we make the assumption that the builder is the same, we also get an idea of the time period of the Ferrari, as his work bridges the time when open motors end and the mabuchis begin.

 

cast-aluminum_4058.JPG

 

Sometime I will post more about "iso" and "monocoque" aspects of the Ferrari f1.


Jimmy Allen

#12 Bill from NH

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Posted 02 July 2018 - 01:14 PM

These open frame motors will build into good cars too. The one in the middle looks long, but it could have been intended for a stockcar.


Bill Fernald
 

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