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Capacitors in controllers?


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#1 FutureStarsRaceway

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Posted 02 October 2018 - 08:29 PM

Looking for ways to tell if racers are using capacitors. What’s the best way to tell. Things to look for?


John Greaves
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#2 Mr. M

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Posted 02 October 2018 - 08:43 PM

And what is the function you are aiming for with this add? I am not familiar with adding a cap to a controller.
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#3 FutureStarsRaceway

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Posted 02 October 2018 - 08:47 PM

Just to keep everyone on a level playing field, we run track shut off races. Don’t want any unfair advantages from guys getting power when track shuts off gaining positions.


John Greaves
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#4 Phil Hackett

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Posted 02 October 2018 - 09:03 PM

If this were the days  of resistor controllers I'd tell you to wire a polarity reversing switch into the track and before the first heat switch the power backwards. Power coming on 3---2---1--- BANG! Beware some people might think there's gunfire if you do this...


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#5 Bill from NH

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Posted 02 October 2018 - 09:19 PM

John, are you running Reality Racing type cars in Attleboro? One of my wife's sisters lives in So. Attleboro, so I occasionally visit that area. Years ago there was R/C racing held behind a restaurant in North Attleboro. I saw the ROAR Nats there once.


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#6 FutureStarsRaceway

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Posted 03 October 2018 - 01:37 AM

I just like to educate myself on this so I can be aware of what to watch for. But I do like the 3-2-1 bang... LOL.

Yes, that’s me in Attleboro running the Reality type cars love them.
You got my thinking if I think it could be happening just do the 3-2-1 go but don’t.. if there is power in a capacitor they might move and the gig is up.

Side note... I have never had any issues at my track or thought anyone has done this. But that doesn’t mean not to educate yourself for the future


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#7 smichslot

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Posted 03 October 2018 - 03:26 AM

It has to be a very large capacitor added to the controller to give any benefit at all. A capacitor the size of a large beer-can will give a small benefit to a high-power car, and a somewhat higher benefit for cars running Hawk or similar motor.

It will. however, make the controller twice as large, and will be easily visible. Smaller capacitors can be used but will give very limited or almost zero benefit.

 

To check the controllers for capacitors do this:

 

1) Connect the controller to a power supply (12v) or a track that is switched on

2) Connect a resistor (100 ohm/5W) between the output of the controller (Black wire) and the "Ground" of the track (Red wire)

3) Connect a voltmeter between the black wire and the red wire

4) Apply full power on the trigger. You should now read appx 12v on the meter.

5) Switch the track-power OFF (or disconnect the white wire from the track/power-supply

6) Count the number of seconds it takes for the voltmeter to reach 0V (or similar).

 

If you are counting more than 5 seconds the controller will have a seriously large capacitor connected. You should be able to see it.

If you count anything less than 1 second any internal capacitor will be insignificant, and will not make the car run any longer.

 

Good luck

 

Steen


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#8 Kim Lander

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Posted 03 October 2018 - 03:58 AM

Make a panel with 8 volt meters... one for each lane. When you cut power for track call, etc. just watch the volt meters... the slower the bleed off of volts will indicate a cap in line.



#9 mreibman

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Posted 03 October 2018 - 09:56 AM

Tangentially....

 

back in the 80's we could buy a lead wire set with a capacitor installed between the guide clips. I think I still have a car with that setup on it.

 

Wouldn't that show up the same way it would in the controller?

 

From my understanding later on the road of experience, they said the capacitor would act like a filter to the power. But I also remember hearing some tales of 9v batteries hidden in controllers from the 70's or so.


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#10 old & gray

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Posted 03 October 2018 - 10:13 AM

Tangentially....

 

back in the 80's we could buy a lead wire set with a capacitor installed between the guide clips. I think I still have a car with that setup on it.

 

Wouldn't that show up the same way it would in the controller?

 

From my understanding later on the road of experience, they said the capacitor would act like a filter to the power. But I also remember hearing some tales of 9v batteries hidden in controllers from the 70's or so.

 

Yes the capacitor could provide filtering for ripple in the track power. On the other hand if there was a significant amount of energy in the capacitor then there would be an arc across the break contact in the  controller.

 

And no, a capacitor across the braids in the car would not have the same effect as a capacitor in a controller.


Bob Schlain





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