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Jay Gee 100 controller OK for serious Scale racing?


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#1 Dan Miller

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Posted 09 May 2019 - 03:35 PM

Where online where I can find out about the range of motors this controller will handle and what all the control settings and switches may adjust or do? I used mine in the past, on a fast King track, running open armatures. That means the relay was full on for 99% of the time. In other words, the controller was used as an on/off switch. I want to know if it will work fairly well for serious Scale Sports and F1 racing on difficult flat tracks?

 

Any Scale racers use or have used a Jay Gee 100?

 

Thanks.






#2 CDavis7

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Posted 09 May 2019 - 04:39 PM

Jeff Goldberg is still around. Havent communicated with him in a longtime but the JG 100 should handle any scale stuff without issue. Add a fan if the heat sink gets hot.

Its a transistor based controller like difalcos.
Chris Davis
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#3 team burrito

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Posted 09 May 2019 - 06:46 PM

are those still around? i thought they were out of production?


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#4 Zippity

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Posted 09 May 2019 - 09:56 PM

I have one - used probably 3 or 4 times, for sale, if anyone is interested :)

 

Sorry, I have just looked at my JayGee controller only to find that it is the upgraded Linear 2 model.


Ron Thornton

#5 Zippity

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Posted 09 May 2019 - 10:40 PM

12-29-2008, 08:56 AM
To answer the original question...

While both the JayGee Racing Linear 200 and Third Eye Renagade controllers feature linear trigger response, zero dead band wipers and mosfet brakes, there are significant differences between the two units. Although I’m a high tech marketing weenie in my real life, I’ll do my best to leave the marketing hype aside and give you the straight info on the most significant differences.

The Linear 200 is a modular design, with separate detachable handles and transistor modules. All of the controller models use the same handle…only the transistor modules are different. The significance of that will become more apparent as you read on.

Linear 200 Handle –

There is only one wire in the handle…period. The Linear 200 uses a single piece of 18 or 20 gauge lead wire (I’ve used both TQ and ProSlot leadwire with equal success) to connect the wiper arm to the wiper board. A single mechanical contact shuts off the power transistor AND energizes the brake circuit…there aren’t multiple contacts and multiple moving wires in the trigger assembly. 

The Linear 200 Pro 40 is equipped with ball bearings for the trigger, standard.

The Linear 200 sensitivity and brake controls feature numbered calibration markings on the PCB.

The Linear 200 handle is connected to the transistor module with an industry standard USB cable that plugs into the wiper board. If you want a longer cable, you can buy one w/o having to invest in a custom made cable assembly. 

Linear 200 Pro 40 Transistor Module – 

The Linear 200’s blast relay is rated at 40 Amps to handle cobalt racing. The Renegade’s blast relay is rated for less. Even though you’re cars draw far less current, higher rated relays often have less contact resistance. The transistor module is also wired with 10 gauge wire, not 12 gauge as is the Renagade.

The brakes are software controlled…allowing you to completely change the brake functionality by swapping control chips. When equipped with the Brake ‘N Release™ chip, the brake knob controls how long the brakes are engaged at full strength before releasing and allowing the car to coast. When equipped with the PWM brake chip, the brake knob controls how strong the brakes are…similar to how the brake adjustment feels on conventional controllers.

When equipped with the PWM brake chip, the Linear 200’s brake pot gives a wider range of control adjustment. While the brakes are very strong for 1/24th scale racing, I’ve already received reports from a prolific and respected SCI board member that the brake profile used in that chip is suitable for lightweight plastic 1/32 scale cars. This is significant as most 1/32 scale racers will tell you that not only are different trigger responses required for 1/32 scale cars, but also different brake pots.

The controller does not use a PTC for brake circuit protection. PTC’s are thermally activated devices that heat up when excessive current runs through them. The temp rise increases their resistance, preventing damaging current from running through the brake circuit. The drawbacks of PTCs is that at room temp, they generally have a higher resistance than that of a 10 amp fuse and after tripping, they don’t completely return to the same resistance they had before they tripped.

Instead, the Linear 200 monitors the current in the brake line electronically with a MOSFET driver and current sense resistor, shutting off the MOSFET if the current exceeds a set amount. Using this approach, the total resistance of ALL the components used in the brake circuit (brake MOSFET, current sense resistor, and reverse polarity protection MOSFET) is less that the PTC alone…let alone the brake MOSFET or pots used in conventional controllers. The reset after tripping is virtually instantaneous (on the order of microseconds) and complete as there are no components in the circuit that need to cool down to bring their resistance down. Since lower resistance leads to stronger brakes, I made every possible design decision to minimize resistance while proviing a resettable brake.

Additional transistor modules designed for HO and 1/32 plastic cars are undergoing field trials now (Hence my earlier comment about PWM brake profile adjustability) These modules are programmable, changing the behavior of the trigger, sensitivity and brake pots in the handle to best suit the needs of those cars. 

For example, the Linear 200’s brake pot will switch from Brake N’ Release™ to Brake/Powered Coast functionality when the HO transistor module is plugged in. The benefit to the user…for about 100 bucks, you can take your Linear 200 Pro 40 controller and go HO racing.

I also tend to provide more design information about the Linear 200 than you’ll find on the Renegade. Like Howard, I won’t divulge what I consider the crown jewels of my design, but I’ve published articles on controller design in magazines and on my website…allowing folks to build or modify their own linear response controllers. Want to add a voltage limiter to the Linear 200? I’ve coauthored an article with one of my customers, showing you how to do it for about $20. Want a Eurosport choke? Buy a larger heat sink from an electronics distributor…and the voltage limiter becomes a choke suitable for Eurosports. 

Hope all this helps. I've also much more information on my website, including technical articles and customer testimonials.

Happy holidays to all,
Jeff
 
 
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Ron Thornton

#6 Ramcatlarry

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Posted 09 May 2019 - 10:48 PM

The JG 100 is the early one with parts you can see and repair.  It was replaced by the surface mount parts JG 200.  I would use my '100' more often, but it is my backup to my Difalco 30 band.  I raced with and talked to Jeff last weekend at the Bloomington Flat Track Fiesta.  He cannot service controllers at this time.

 

The JG 100 should be a good starter flat track controller for Retro up to group 12, but hot 12s might make it overheat.  When it came out, it was competing with 10 band Difaco and 8-10 band Ruddicks.  I might know where  to find one.

 

Ron - what was the date on Jeff's quoted post?


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#7 Zippity

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Posted 09 May 2019 - 11:33 PM

Larry

 

On top right of my post:  29 - 12 - 2008  :)

 

I have since placed an ad in the For Sale thread, for this item.


Ron Thornton

#8 team burrito

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Posted 10 May 2019 - 01:20 AM

get a carsteen; it's the only controller you'll need.


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Russ Toy (not Troy)
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#9 Dan Miller

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Posted 10 May 2019 - 11:33 AM

Thanks for your comments. I am sitting on 3 of the Linear 100 controllers and have 4 spare wiper printed circuit boards as well. They were used about 10 hours on a fast King track and have 40 amp relays. That is all the action they have seen. They went back in the box and sat for years. Now it is time to let them go so I put them on Ebay and will sell them one at a time.

 







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