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What happened in 1966?


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#1 Fred_J

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Posted 16 May 2020 - 10:38 AM

At the 1965 Western States race, the winner powered by a Pittman 196 in a lightweight chassis, and Dynamic chassis with 16D motors were a popular choice.

By the time of the first Rod & Custom race, no Pittman motors showed up in the Main, but Dynamic chassis were still competitive as of race 4.

By the end of the year, it was all scratchbuilt chassis powered by 16D motors.

Was there any particular development(s) that drove this, or was it just the rapid pace of evolution?
 


Fred Jespersen




#2 Ramcatlarry

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Posted 16 May 2020 - 02:03 PM

Alnico magnet motors have no brakes without reverse power and variable brakes had not (?) been invented yet.  Many racers were already drafted (Vietnam) or about to be.  The age of the ceramic magnet motor began in earnest.


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#3 don.siegel

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Posted 16 May 2020 - 03:34 PM

Fred, 

 

The first R&C race had one car make the main with a modified Tyco sidewinder motor - the type of car that actually held the lap record, but with a "wet wick" - constantly cleaned commutator - that was prohibited in the R&C series. One more of these may have made a semi in the next race, but that was it for non-can motors in most big races. Modified Dynamic chassis did make a semi or two within the next year or so, but mostly because they were run by Team Dynamic, who was probably obliged. They are great chassis, especially with a little added brass, but guess they just weren't up to the standard of these state-of-the-art scratchbuilt chassis. 

 

Larry, I don't think the first generation of 16D rewinds had any better brakes than a 196 with rezapped magnet. That probably changed with the Arcos. Also, in most of these races, the power brakes just weren't allowed, that was mostly a local thing. Not sure what you mean by "variable brakes". 

 

I assume this was all due to the rapid pace of development as you suggest, and also to the fact that the guys mostly built new chassis for each race, and could tailor them to the track, but I wasn't there - would love to hear from someone who was down in the pits! 

 

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#4 Ramcatlarry

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Posted 16 May 2020 - 03:51 PM

Early cars were always lacking brakes for certain.  Adding 1.5 - 3 volts opposite voltage in the red controller wire is the only way to get most Pittmans to slow down, but it was usually too much.  Modern controllers commonly use a 3 - 5 ohm variable resistor to modulate the braking action.  I never saw one until the 1990s, not saying it was not in use somewhere before that.


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#5 blue&orange

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Posted 17 May 2020 - 11:34 AM

I have been researching the R&C races, too.  Aside from that one Tyco, the motors used in the 6 races were modified Cox, Russkit 23, Stormbecker Hemi 300 and Dynamic.  Throughout the series the rewound motors got more powerful, but the tire width remained the same, so it seems the cars became heavier as the series went on so they could handle better -- they moved from lightweight brass tube space frames to lower, heavier brass rod jail door style, with emphasis on heavier drop arms.  That style remained the same for one more year through the 1967 Car Model races, with the exception of the development of the "Sloppy Sam" (hinged) outrigger body mounts.  By 1968 the sidewinders were here to stay.  


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#6 tonyp

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Posted 17 May 2020 - 02:42 PM

The tin can motors surpassed the pitman styles rather quickly as people started rewinding their own or bought one over the counter.

In lines were easier to build because of the layout and you could easily get correct gearing with out worrying about a big tire size.


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