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1963 Shelby Cooper Monaco King Cobra


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#1 dc-65x

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Posted 17 October 2020 - 03:15 PM

Check out this video of Dave McDonald drifting his King Cobra to a win at the 1963 Riverside Times Grand Prix:

 

 

Here's a video of the race itself:

 

 

I've been saving a vintage Pactra version of the car:

 

King Cobra Body (5).JPG

 

King Cobra Body (1).JPG

 

But first a "MISSION STATEMENT" for this project if I may:

 

I am not going to attempt to build an exact scale miniature motorized model.

Rather, I want to build my version of a 1965 commercial track slot racer or “shop car”.

The real car will serve as an inspiration rather than an exact blueprint for my build.

 

I'm starting this build with a motor.......actually a combination of 2 motors. A Pittman 706 for its precisely made field and end plates and A RAM 426 for its hot armature:

 

PittRam Motor (2).JPG

 

The Pittman 706 motor was not harmed. EJ's Hobbies had the piecies I needed:

 

PittRam Motor (3).JPG

 

The RAM wasn't so lucky   :shok:   :crazy:

 

PittRam Motor (5).JPG

 

Time to start putting the pieces together.........


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#2 Horsepower

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Posted 17 October 2020 - 07:10 PM

What a teaser. This is gonna be good!


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#3 Isaac S.

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Posted 17 October 2020 - 08:17 PM

I have been waiting to see a 706 car. I have really wanted to see the brass on that 706 gleam. Pittman's are my favorite to modify because of showing arms and cast metals that can be polished (brass, aluminum). Great preview!


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#4 Isaac S.

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Posted 17 October 2020 - 08:23 PM

I forgot to mention that I LOVE Shelby's.  :heart:  :heart:  :heart:  :heart:  :heart:


Isaac Santonastaso

#5 dc-65x

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Posted 17 October 2020 - 08:46 PM

I love Pittman's and Shelby's too and this Pittman definitely needs some polishing up.   :D

 

I wanted to go with the Pittman setup for my RAM arm because of its more precisely made components versus the RAM's stamped parts. The ram uses simple stamped upper and lower pole pieces that don't really conform to the armature. Check out the how the Pittman fits the arm:

 

Pittman 703-706 Top Speed Challenge- 003.JPG

 

But just screwing those new packaged Pittman parts together...........

 

PittRam Motor (1).JPG

 

.......lead to a misaligned mess:

 

PittRam Motor.JPG

 

Turns out there are burrs from the drilled holes and casting flash that are causing the problem. I'm getting to work on that and I'll be upgrading the motor with these goodies. Weldun 64P gears, SKF armature ball bearings, Boca axle ball bearings and a drill blank axle:

 

PittRam Motor (6).JPG

 

And instead of the Pittman brushes I'm going to go with the RAM brushes and try the RAM 850 brush spring assortment with 3 different tensions:

 

PittRam Motor (4).JPG

 

Time to start deburring and polishing those Pittman parts....

 

 

 


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#6 don.siegel

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Posted 18 October 2020 - 03:43 AM

Another great project Rick, thanks for letting us watch. 

 

Have you also worked on the Ram DC222 and how would it compare? I'm wondering because I just saw one run in a vintage race and it seemed to be faster than the usual motor of this type. That's a 7-pole arm and the arms are available separately, which I don't think is the case for the 426. 

 

Don 



#7 dc-65x

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Posted 18 October 2020 - 12:08 PM

I haven't used a RAM DC222 yet Don but I've got a project in mind for one. That armature appears to be a 3/32" shaft version of the DC850.

 

Speaking of armatures, here's the one in the DC426:

 

PittRam Motor (8).JPG

 

The stack was a bit to large in diameter for the Pittman setup and needed to be turned down. The laminations were pretty sloppy anyway. A little epoxy on the windings and a carbide lathe bit worked great:

 

PittRam Motor (12).JPG

 

The comm was way out of round too:

 

PittRam Motor (13).JPG

 

The arm wouldn't stop in the same place when I rolled it on the razor blades for balancing so I left well enough alone:

 

PittRam Motor (7).JPG

 

 

 


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#8 Pablo

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Posted 18 October 2020 - 12:26 PM

:heart:  :heart:  :heart:  :heart:


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#9 Isaac S.

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Posted 18 October 2020 - 01:22 PM

Looks fantastic! I really need to buy a hobby lathe, I would use it every day. 


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#10 Bill from NH

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Posted 18 October 2020 - 06:38 PM

One of the best investments I ever made in the hobby. I bought a Unimat in 1970. They're no longer made, today I'd take a hard look at the Sherline & the Taig.


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#11 dc-65x

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Posted 19 October 2020 - 10:56 AM

A hobby lathe is a valuable tool and can be lots of fun. So can a small milling machine. I used mine to drill lightening holes into the Weldun gear. I will probably increase my rear wheel speed by at least 2 or 3 rpm.  :crazy:   Well, it does look cool:

 

Pittman 703-706 Top Speed Challenge- 018.JPG

 

 Here are the end plates all deburred and polished out. I also added two tapped holes to mount the motor to a chassis:

 

PittRam Motor (9).JPG

 

And here with the dual ball bearings installed compared to the stock piece:

 

PittRam Motor (10).JPG

 

Putting all the pieces together my hobby lathe was put to use again. The Weldun gear needed a little trimming to clear the armature.......


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#12 dc-65x

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Posted 22 October 2020 - 04:08 PM

The motor is done. Those old "iron" magnets sure go dead when you remove the field plates. Thankfully they come back to life with a good ZAP of the assembled motor.

 

I decided to set up the axle spacing with a brass spacer on the gear side and a turned down guide collar on the other:

 

PittRam Motor (15).JPG

 

PittRam Motor (14).JPG

 

The heaviest of the RAM 850 brush springs is almost fully compressed in this motor setup:

 

PittRam Motor (20).JPG

 

A couple of different angles of the finished PittRAM 726:

 

PittRam Motor (17).JPG

 

PittRam Motor (19).JPG

 

 

 

 


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#13 SpeedyNH

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Posted 22 October 2020 - 04:53 PM

nice. curious, what'd you use for a slug to zap the mags? 


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#14 dc-65x

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Posted 22 October 2020 - 05:46 PM

Hi Steve,

 

I zap the old open frame and laminated field motors the way we did in my local raceways back in the 60's, completely assembled. I know this is currently frowned upon with the newer can motors. But this old motor went from a guass reading in the low 100's to the mid 500's after zapping.

 

Below is a thread I did on:

 

Zapping Pittman magnets

 

The above test could be carried further by zapping the setup with a custom slug, pulling it out and replacing the arm and seeing if the gauss reading is higher than just zapping the assembled motor..........


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#15 Pablo

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Posted 22 October 2020 - 07:10 PM

What a machine  :heart:  :heart:  :heart:  :aggressive:  :aggressive:  :aggressive:  :D


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#16 Jay Guard

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Posted 22 October 2020 - 07:16 PM

Rick:

As usual, not just great workmanship, ART!!


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Way too serious Retro racer


#17 Martin

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Posted 22 October 2020 - 11:23 PM

Looking good Rick, got to ask, how did you get the lighting holes in the gear evenly spaced?

 

I have a rotary table but your pic shows another method?  Do you have an octagonal axle or just an eagle eye?


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#18 dc-65x

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Posted 23 October 2020 - 11:43 AM

Hi Martin,

 

No eagle eye or need to set up a rotary table for a simple 45 degree 8 hole pattern. All you need is the radius for the holes at 90 degrees and a single X and Y value for the holes at 45 degrees.

 

You can find the X and Y numbers by:

 

JustDoTheMath-860x500.jpg

 

As an apprentice machinist they made me "do the math"............  :o

 

rectangular-polar-coordinates.png

 

...........but now I just plug in the numbers into an online calculator......easy peasy  :)

 

Polar to Rectangular Calculator


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#19 Martin

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Posted 23 October 2020 - 12:36 PM

Thanks for explaining that. I would be concerned about the slop in my X Y. I have no auxiliary dial readout on my mill, just the barrel dial.

But good to know that math method.

I bet I never use it. :wacko2:


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#20 SpeedyNH

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Posted 23 October 2020 - 01:48 PM

online calculator- Geez, Captain, you don't own a single handheld scientific calculator? i should send you one. way faster and you can check your answer by doing the inverse or a known similar angle. maybe that's just me. 

 

 

what did the acorn say when he grew up? 

 

 

geometry 


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#21 dc-65x

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Posted 23 October 2020 - 02:44 PM

No need to check my answers Steve. You know everything on the internet is true.    :wacko2:  :laugh2:  :D


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#22 Dave Crevie

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Posted 23 October 2020 - 03:24 PM

Martin; Try to find the axis with the most amount of play. This is usually the X axis. Work only in one direction in that axis. You can slightly tighten the table lock while moving to the next co-ordinate to keep the lead screw loaded. Use the Y axis as the one you will have to backtrack with. Do all the holes you can in one direction first.

I.E. All the co-ordinates that are plus from your original datum. Keep the cross slide lock slightly tightened to keep the Y axis lead screw loaded. Return to your Y axis datum, and go slightly past it. Then move the X axis to the next co-ordinate and repeat the process. 

 

So to try and make this explanation simpler, let's use Rick's gear as an example. And let's say the bolt circle is 1 inch. That makes the radius from the axle hole to each of the drilled holes .500 inch. Movements from right to left of the table (X axis) will be +, and movements of the table from front to back (Y axis) will be +. The axle hole will be the datum, X = 0, Y = 0. Pick up the center of the axle hole with an indicator, and lock the table locks. Turn the handle for the table clockwise until the play is out, and set the dial for "0". Turn the handle for the cross slide clockwise until the play is out, and set that dial for "0". Loosen the table lock for the cross slide. Move the table in the Y axis, (cross slide) to .500 on the dial. (this will be 2 and 1/2 turns clockwise, and will actually read .100 on the dial) Lock the table locks and drill the hole. ( this should be the one nearest to you) Unlock the cross slide lock, and back the Y axis to - .500 ( 5 turns counter clockwise), and go a little past that mark. ( half turn will do) Now turn the Y axis handle (cross slide) clockwise to the .100 mark. and lock the table. Drill that hole. ( it will be the one farthest from you)  Now you have to move to the first of the holes at 45 degrees off the axle hole. Since the sine for 45 degrees is .70711, we multiply .500 times .70711 to get .3535. Turn the X axis handle 1 and 1/2 turns clockwise. The dial should read .100. Now go past that to the .135 mark, which should be .353 from the axle hole in the X axis. Move the Y axis handle to - . 353. ( 2 turns counter clockwise to 0 on the dial, then lightly lock the cross slide lock and turn the handle to .146 on the dial.) Lock the table and drill this hole. (this will be the hole to the right of the axle hole, and farthest from you) Now, unlock the Y axis cross slide and simply go to + .353. ( 3 1/2 turns clockwise on the handle and past 0 to the .153 on the dial. You should be 1 and 1/2 turns past the "0" datum of the Y axis [plus .053]) Drill the hole. ( this should be the hole to the right of the axle hole and nearest to you)  Now  unlock the cross slide and back the Y axis to 0 (4 turns counter clockwise of the handle) Lightly tighten the cross slide lock, and turn the handle clockwise to "0". Turn the X axis handle clockwise to 0 on the dial, and another half turn to .100. Lock the table and drill the hole. This should be the hole farthest to the right, and completes the hole pattern to the right of the axle hole. Now unlock the X axis table lock, and turn the X axis handle counter clockwise 5 turns, plus a little. (half turn will do). Snug up the X axis table lock a little, a turn the handle clockwise to the .100 mark on the dial. This should be - .500. Lock the table and drill the hole. This will be the hole farthest to the left. Unlock the X axis table lock, and turn the handle half a turn, then to the .046. Lock the table. Unlock the Y axis cross slide lock and turn the Y axis handle counter clockwise 2 turns, then clockwise to the .046. Lock the cross slide and drill the hole. This will be the hole to the left of the axle hole and farthest away from you. Now unlock the cross slide lock and turn the Y axis handle clockwise 3 turns and to the .153 on the dial. Lock the table and drill the hole. This will be the hole to the left of the axle hole and nearest to you. That finishes the drilling. 

 

Naturally, this is much simpler with a DRO (digital read out) But if you have neither a DRO nor rotary table with degree scale it is the most accurate. And really should be done with a center drill to spot the holes in any event.            



#23 Larry Horner

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Posted 23 October 2020 - 04:54 PM

That motor looks awesome Rick and I love the lightened anodized gear! Can't wait to see where this is going next. Curiously all that trig has me craving some pumpkin pi?



#24 Martin

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Posted 23 October 2020 - 10:56 PM

  Dave, thanks for taking the time.

I have been dealing with back lash in the machine shop all my working life  :laugh2:

For me this is a job for a rotary table. Drill a hole every 45 degrees, done. If I ever loose my rotary table I will read your method again out of necessity.

Your correct, I always use a center drill before drilling holes :good:

Now back to your amazing build Rick. :heart:


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#25 Don Weaver

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Posted 24 October 2020 - 08:52 AM

 

For me this is a job for a rotary table. Drill a hole every 45 degrees, done. 

 

I agree, Maartin.  I love my Sherline rotary table for this kind of work...


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