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Russkit catalog 1963


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#1 ravajack

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Posted 08 December 2020 - 06:11 PM

Click on the picture below to enjoy this rare and seldom seen historic document in full resolution.

 

1963x4.jpg


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#2 Isaac S.

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Posted 08 December 2020 - 07:45 PM

Very cool to see early Russkit things. Thanks. 


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#3 Phil Hackett

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Posted 08 December 2020 - 09:14 PM

A body that cost $2.98 in 1963 would cost $25.50 in 2020 US dollars. (Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics). 

 

 

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#4 don.siegel

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Posted 09 December 2020 - 04:54 AM

Great find, Bertil. Thanks for posting. Don't think I've ever seen this one. 

 

Seems Big Jim was still a bit confused: it's Russ-Kit on the cover and then Russkit after that... 

 

$2.98 was a lot of money in 1963, especially for a vac-form body, even if "combined the best features of vac-forming and injection molding"... (not sure what he means there, always thought they were just vac-formed of a heavier and colored plastic). That was more the price for a fiberglass body at the time, and I believe, a lot more labor-intensive, while the early vac-forms were mostly $1 and the injection molded bodies $1 or $1.50... 



#5 Dave Crevie

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Posted 09 December 2020 - 10:12 AM

I have several Du-Bro bodies from that era still on the card. The price is marked $.95.



#6 Bill from NH

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Posted 09 December 2020 - 02:03 PM

I think some of Dubro's 1/32 bodies were $.59. I've had a clear Porsche 917 since the early 70's.


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#7 old & gray

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Posted 09 December 2020 - 03:15 PM

 

$2.98 was a lot of money in 1963, especially for a vac-form body, even if "combined the best features of vac-forming and injection molding"... (not sure what he means there, always thought they were just vac-formed of a heavier and colored plastic). That was more the price for a fiberglass body at the time, and I believe, a lot more labor-intensive, while the early vac-forms were mostly $1 and the injection molded bodies $1 or $1.50... 

 

No question the cost was high. I'm burning some memory cells here but I seem to remember someone (might have been Russkit) was pulling bodies with negative models. Standard positive models put the detail on the inside of the plastic, while pulling the plastic into a cavity (negative) put the details on the outside. 

 

Like I said digging out some old memories things here. 


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#8 don.siegel

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Posted 09 December 2020 - 04:02 PM

The blow-molded bodies were by Detail Models, also with clear plastic... 

 

Don 



#9 tonyp

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Posted 09 December 2020 - 06:34 PM

I believe the RussKit empire started with Russ-Coat.
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#10 Jesse Gonzales

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Posted 09 December 2020 - 11:07 PM

Growing up in a "Barrio" south of the tracks slot cars were something many of the guys I grew up around was the furthest thing from doing, too expensive and in exclusively more affluent parts of town. My oldest brother came home on leave and in his duffel bag was a broken slot car, wow I was elated. I rode my bike up north into wealthy neighborhoods where the streets were paved and had sidewalks, found M&S raceway a dark musty place with one track kind of like an Engleman. I produced my broken car and asked for advice, the owner (Mike) why were all slot car guys named Mike back then? checked to motor and found it burned out. He told me what I would need to buy, "BUY" wrong words to a kid from the wrong side of the tracks. He gave me some old crap to fool around with including a F! cooper body with the nose torn off and a couple of burned out motors. I produced some change and bought some RussCoat, my first ever slot car purchase, I used that stick brown goo to repair the Cooper. I learned rewinding and soldering and came back with my Barrio sled and became just another track rat. Eventually I got all around town with my car that looked like a dog who chewed his way through a chain link fence, much scoffed at and dismissed but won enough tickets to start being a threat on the track all  over town. RussCoat was good stuff but I think it was Birchwood Casey Tung Oil recanted into little bottles.

 

Jess Gonzales


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#11 Bill from NH

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Posted 09 December 2020 - 11:27 PM

Jesse, what city did you grow up in as a kid? Was it Tucson or somewhere else?


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#12 ravajack

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Posted 10 December 2020 - 07:11 AM

 RussCoat was good stuff but I think it was Birchwood Casey Tung Oil recanted into little bottles.

According to this site (https://afxracing.co...ory-of-russkit/) Russ-Coat was actually something called "Behr varnish":

 

"In 1959, 34-year-old Jim Russell was looking for something to do on a weekend when a friend introduced him to a novel new hobby called slot car racing. Russ, as everyone calls him, was hooked.
 
Then, in early 1963 while refinishing a coffee table, some Behr varnish spilled on one of Jim’s cars. He didn’t notice until after it dried but the effect was dramatic. Ever the entrepreneur, Jim decided to market his discovery and a new product and company were born.
 
Russkit was incorporated in November of 1963 but its first product, Russ-Cote, actually hit the shelves in the summer of that year." 

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#13 Jesse Gonzales

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Posted 10 December 2020 - 05:04 PM

Bill, I grew up in Phoenix about two miles from where Mark Wampler lived we both probably used the plane start up noise at Sky Harbor to wake up and the train to let us know when to start walking to school. One of my curses is having very good memory, guys I met as a kid are still in there just like we first met. I met Mark at Henry's Hobbies in Tempe during one of my bike rides to tracks across the valley. I don't know how I survived my treks as some took me through pretty rough areas just to get to a track.

 

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