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JK C30 F1/Indy narrow chassis


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#1 Hufo Racing Team

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Posted 12 November 2020 - 11:36 AM

Has anybody here some experience with this type of chassis?

 

After purchasing two C30 F1/Indy chassis, Tim Homola (JK Products) suggested me to join in this Slotblog forum.

 

I've been "outlining" both chassis on my techblock, and I‘ve noticed the following:

 

Holding the chassis in my hand in a horizontally position, the rear of the one-piece pan “hangs” lower than the centerpart (approx. 0,5 mm) Is this normal?

 

As a retired national and international slot racer (and returned to my attick) racing in 1/24 Eurosports and X12 classes, I’m used to ground clearances of 1 mm (and up to 1.5 mm here at home on my Carrera track). So for me it’s a normal thing all (rear) chassisparts have the same groundclearance.

 

I’ve a solution in mind, but is it a good idea:

 

Once the chassis is laying on the tech block, should I solder the cross bar onto the pan (at both sides), while that same cross bar is laying flat on the centerpart?

 

That way the pan can still move in all directions, after all, it's a one-piece pan.

 

When I mentioned this idea to Tim, he answered: "most people leave the cross bar loose to maximize compliance of the chassis."

 

So now, I'm wondering if I'll do well with soldering.

 

Greetings from Belgium,

 

Hubert


Hubert Fornoville




#2 Eddie Fleming

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Posted 12 November 2020 - 01:52 PM

use two sided tape and put a shim under the cross bar on the center section. This will lift the pans and still leave movement. do not solder the bar in place.

 

these chassis are often run with tape limiting the moment of the pans. play with that and see what works for you on your track.


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#3 Rotorranch

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Posted 12 November 2020 - 02:29 PM

If you place a straight edge on the pans from front to rear, you'll see the pans are arched upwards in the middle of the pans. That makes the rear of the pans hang below the center section.

 

It takes a bit of time, but you can get it flat and level.

 

Rotor


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#4 Bill from NH

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Posted 12 November 2020 - 03:23 PM

A block of wood & a tack hammer works wonders when you need to flatten chassis. Then use a tech block or another known flat surface to check if you've achieved the flatness you want. I checked mine on a small surface plate, but one isn't actually needed.


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#5 Clyde Romero

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Posted 12 November 2020 - 03:43 PM

Has anybody here some experience with this type of chassis?

 

After purchasing two C30 F1/Indy chassis, Tim Homola (JK Products) suggested me to join in this Slotblog forum.

 

I've been "outlining" both chassis on my techblock, and I‘ve noticed the following:

 

Holding the chassis in my hand in a horizontally position, the rear of the one-piece pan “hangs” lower than the centerpart (approx. 0,5 mm) Is this normal?

 

As a retired national and international slot racer (and returned to my attick) racing in 1/24 Eurosports and X12 classes, I’m used to ground clearances of 1 mm (and up to 1.5 mm here at home on my Carrera track). So for me it’s a normal thing all (rear) chassisparts have the same groundclearance.

 

I’ve a solution in mind, but is it a good idea:

 

Once the chassis is laying on the tech block, should I solder the cross bar onto the pan (at both sides), while that same cross bar is laying flat on the centerpart?

 

That way the pan can still move in all directions, after all, it's a one-piece pan.

 

When I mentioned this idea to Tim, he answered: "most people leave the cross bar loose to maximize compliance of the chassis."

 

So now, I'm wondering if I'll do well with soldering.

 

Greetings from Belgium,

 

Hubert

 

Where in Belgium are you?

 

I used to go SPA for the F-1 for many years was supposed to go this year but the virus interrupted our plans 

 

We would stay in Hasselt 

 

Love the country 

 

Clyde 



#6 Hufo Racing Team

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Posted 13 November 2020 - 10:26 AM

Hello, Clyde,

I'm living in the Antwerp region.

I don't go to F1, but usually go to see the Spa Classics with my wife. It's a fantastic event. But alike the F1, and other events, the Classics 've been canceled too because of the V. with a C.

That's why I've been doing my own "Spa Classics" on my track at home. You can see it all on my Fb page. Just search "Hufo Racing Team" and watch the movies I made in a few posts ...

Grts

Hubert

 

Where in Belgium are you?

 

I used to go SPA for the F-1 for many years was supposed to go this year but the virus interrupted our plans 

 

We would stay in Hasselt 

 

Love the country 

 

Clyde 


Hubert Fornoville

#7 Hufo Racing Team

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Posted 14 November 2020 - 01:17 PM

After rectifying both parts, the pans still hung lower than the centerpart at the rear.

But I've decided NOT to solder the cross bar. This'll  make it still possible (and easier) to disassemble the chassis.

Alike Eddie suggested in his reply, I've  glued a piece of shim under the cross bar with double-sided tape.

The pan is now perfectly flush with the centerpart, can still move sufficiently upwards, and is still sufficiently mobile in the other directions.

You can see the result on the 1st photo.

The 2nd photo shows a close up.

The shim is positioned so, that it's always under the cross bar, in whatever position it may be. And it's cut in such a way that it doesn't disturb the 1-piece pan in its movements.

The 3rd photo shows the groundclearance, after the provisional placement of the rear- and front wheels, and the jetguide with braids. As you can see the chassis is now almost "level". And that's what I love.

Rear wheels are 0.760", fronts are (JK Products T113F) 0.740" diameter.

Even with these "small" wheels, the ground clearance is approximately 1,5 mm.

Next step: the front axle …

 

Lots Of Slots

Hubert

 

HRT Sb 001a.jpg

 

HRT Sb 001b.jpg

 

HRT Sb 001c.jpg


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Hubert Fornoville

#8 Hufo Racing Team

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Posted 17 November 2020 - 08:22 AM

The supporting cross bar with the front axle's "pillow blocks" needed some more rectifying at the left.

Since the bushing holes allow vertical movement of the front axle, I chose not to glue or solder the bushings.

I fixed the front wheels, with a little play, on the axle with the grub screws. They are therefore not independent.

On the techblock they just hit the surface. And the play in height may be welcome on my Carrera track. Especially in the uphill "donut".

As for the rear axle: rectifying the rear bushing holes wasn't easy. And, the holes are quite large. There's some play for the bushings.

I didn't solder them, but glued them with Loctite 648, with lots of attention to have the rear axle "perfectly level", towards the surface, the chassis, and the front axle.

 

Time for the 1st tests. For the time being without a body.

I fitted both chassis with the same type of X12 motor (soldered).

One with a ratio of 8:38, the other with 7:40. (64 pitch) The 2nd option was the best. Higher rev results in better control.

After all, it's a small track with short straights.

Tires (sponge) are also imprtant.

First tried with Alpha Supernaturals, then Alpha Pirahnas.

The second option was the good one, probably because the F1 / indy chassis is narrower than the regular chassis, so it weighs less.

Power must be sufficiently converted into traction in a short time (due to the short straights)

A few adjustments at my speedcontroller resulted in good results.

Overhere the rule is: a car running under 2 seconds per lap, is a very good car.

So much for the chassis. Time now for painting and decorating. (the bodies)

 

Lots Of Slots

Hubert

 


Hubert Fornoville





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