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CNC: Cutting tool selection


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#1 Dennis David

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Posted 30 December 2017 - 04:02 PM

I found this brochure to be very helpful: https://marketing.da...ool Catalog.pdf

My own easy maybe over simplistic observation is use one type of end mill per material type optimized for each material and dont mix them. Keep cutting length short. Follow guidance and dont use guesswork or your ear. There is 100 years of experience out there, use it. Use smaller tools for harder materials and dont get greedy unless you like to see broken bits fly through the air. Dont watch your work up close unless you want to lose an eye. I will rig up my GoPro (I knew I got it for some reason) and you can watch me!

Reminds me I need a new prescription for my cool safety glasses.
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#2 Ecurie Martini

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Posted 31 December 2017 - 11:35 AM

A lot of very useful information but I was left a bit confused - the tool descriptions cite coatings but not tool material but when I scrolled down to "tool technology" it referenced "solid micro grain carbide"  I wonder if this applies to all of their tools.

 

EM


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#3 Dennis David

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Posted 31 December 2017 - 11:46 AM

All the tools listed were carbide.
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#4 Dennis David

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Posted 15 January 2018 - 10:31 AM

Introduction to Milling Tools
https://www.machinin...Application.pdf

Selecting Milling Tools
https://www.machinin...illingTools.pdf

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#5 Dennis David

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Posted 16 January 2018 - 02:39 PM

Datron 0068030E
Solid Carbide-End Mill with 1 Flute/s
Flute Diameter (D1) = 3 mm
Shank Diameter (D2) = 3 mm
Total Length (L1) = 40 mm
Flute Length (L2) = 10 mm

Datron 0068281
Solid Carbide-Engraving Tool
Flute Diameter (D1) = 0.1 mm
Shank Diameter (D2) = 3 mm
Total Length (L1) = 40 mm
Degree = 60

Datron 0068479
Solid Carbide-Countersink Tool
Flute Diameter (D1) = 6 mm
Shank Diameter (D2) = 6 mm
Total Length (L1) = 50 mm
Flute Length (L2) = 3 mm
Degree = 90

Datron 0068224
Solid Carbide-Drill
Flute Diameter (D1) = 2.4 mm
Shank Diameter (D2) = 3 mm
Total Length (L1) = 38 mm
Flute Length (L2) = 10.5 mm

Datron 0068229
Solid Carbide-Drill
Flute Diameter (D1) = 2.9 mm
Shank Diameter (D2) = 3 mm
Total Length (L1) = 38 mm
Flute Length (L2) = 10.5 mm

Datron 0068419
Solid Carbide-Thread Mill
Flute Diameter (D1) = 1.4 mm
Shank Diameter (D2) = 3 mm
Shank Diameter (D3) = 0.65 mm
Total Length (L1) = 40 mm
Flute Length (L2) = 0.1 mm

Datron 0068403
Solid Carbide-Ball Nose End Mill with 2 Flute/s
Flute Diameter (D1) = 3 mm
Shank Diameter (D2) = 6 mm
Total Length (L1) = 50 mm
Flute Length (L2) = 4 mm

Datron 006T130
Solid Carbide-Micro-Toothed End Mill (X.CEED/Diamond)
Flute Diameter (D1) = 3 mm
Shank Diameter (D2) = 3 mm
Total Length (L1) = 40 mm
Flute Length (L2) = 12 mm

$293.94 for German Carbide Cutting Tools.

This is just an example of small, approximately 1/8 inch cutting tools can cost. American or even Chinese tools would/could be a lot less of course. Bigger sizes are a lot more expensive but with my mill and cutting metal, this would not be a good idea or realistic. Now I need to find a place that sharpens cutting tools.

 


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#6 MarkH

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 01:17 PM

The 4 Primary Rules in the Machine Shop

 

1) ALWAYS wear your safety glasses

2) ALWAYS square up your parts

3) ALWAYS deburr your parts

4) ALWAYS Clean and oil the equipment when finished


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#7 Dennis David

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Posted 17 January 2018 - 01:25 PM

Yep, but you also might want to add face mask as well.


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#8 Dennis David

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 01:34 PM

$99 per year subscription, well worth the money.

 

 


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#9 Bob Kurkowski

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 05:18 PM

Dennis,

 

I would strongly suggest that you use your ear. If something doesn't sound right there is good chance that something is not right.

 

Chatter is one of a cutting tools worse enemies and it can be caused by any number of reasons.

 

Bob K.


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#10 Dennis David

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 08:18 PM

By the time you hear chatter it's sometimes too late. Follow the guides, that's what they're there for.


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#11 Phil Hackett

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 10:49 PM

I might suggest the "recipes" are for machines with adequate power and rigidity. If you watch John's videos you will know that the chips are flying off at a rapid rate and his spindle is registering KWs of electric power consumption. I think in one of his videos he was achieving a 7 horsepower cut... 5.2KW for you metric types, in one set of tests but he had to back off the speed and feeds to keep the machine from being over-stressed.

 

But then again as a starting point it's good... just don't get locked in to a "recipe" and get frustrated. Know when it's the feedrate that needs changing and when the spindle speed needs changing (small tools can't really be spun up fast enough... at times I wish we had 30K spindle for some of the work we do....) and know when the tools he has set the values for may be invalid for what you use. Tool geometry is something you cannot ignore.


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#12 Dennis David

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Posted 01 March 2018 - 10:58 PM

I have a 25,000 rpm spindle but I figured I would need to use a proportion of those rates so would use them as a relative figure. With the small mills I am using I am more concerned with breaking a tool. I have been given suggestions from the manufacturer of my mill to follow. Eventually I will be upgrading my x and y motors when the new controller comes out. 


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#13 Dennis David

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Posted 02 March 2018 - 12:09 AM

Some new solid carbide cutting tools from Germany by way of Livermore, CA

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#14 Phil Hackett

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 04:12 AM

Steel or carbide? Looks like steel... uhm... you should be fine @ 25k in Aluminum... one of the biggest reasons for breaking small tools is the "recutting" of chips. One of the main reasons for coolant is to wash the chips out of the cutting zone. Keep this in mind. Plastic won't matter but with metal it's a critical concern.

 

Another reason for breaking small tools (and sometimes the bigger ones) is the tool path. Even though the computer generates the toolpath you need to recogize the potential of crowding the tool... imagine straightlines ending in a acute angle (think of a V) and the radius is very close to the cutter size... how smooth the control moves through that transition is key. Most controls attempt to keep the feedrate commanded through such features. The Fusion360 "adaptive" toolpath makes consequetive cuts approching the acute angle (I'm VERY sure most CAM systems have the same capability). The adaptive feature keeps the tool cut the same on each pass... I hope this is explained well enough...


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#15 Dallas Racer

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 02:24 PM

Interesting, Phil! A youtube video I was recently watching mentioned something about using 2 flute cutters on aluminum to help evacuate the chips. What's your opinion on this?


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#16 Dennis David

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 06:07 PM

Phil I only use Solid Carbide cutting tools from Germany. ;-) (Datron)

Spot on with the other comments. I will be using Kool mists and a 600 CFM dust collector.

Just saw a video on the adaptive tool paths. My aluminum cutter is a single flute.

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#17 Dennis David

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 06:22 PM

Article on Single Flute End Mills (Your results may vary)

https://www.cnccookb...flute-end-mill/

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#18 Phil Hackett

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 10:13 PM

Interesting, Phil! A youtube video I was recently watching mentioned something about using 2 flute cutters on aluminum to help evacuate the chips. What's your opinion on this?

 

Aluminum forms a big chip if you're machining it at a decent speed. 2 flute cutters have more room to evacuate the chip. This is true for big and small cutters.


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#19 Phil Hackett

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Posted 03 March 2018 - 10:20 PM

Article on Single Flute End Mills (Your results may vary)

https://www.cnccookb...flute-end-mill/

 

I regard single flute "endmills" as router bits and they DO work.

 

Harvey Tool has a very amazing line of rotary tools also: Harvey Tool

 

Micro 100 : Micro 100

 

Kyocera (formerly SGS Carbide) : Kyocera


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#20 Dennis David

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Posted 04 March 2018 - 01:54 AM

Not sure what you mean by router bits. Datron swears by them and they make fair size milling machines. Those Harvey Tools are nice.

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