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How many people CNC or laser cut?


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#26 Richard G With

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Posted 13 October 2018 - 08:04 PM

How about this?

https://m.harborfrei...ct/not provided
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We must all do what we must do, for if we do not, then what we must do does not get done.  Chung Mee

      Parkes, W. (Producer) & Meyer, N. (Director). (1985). Volunteers.[Motion picture]. United States: HBO.

 





#27 slotbaker

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Posted 13 October 2018 - 09:01 PM

Im assuming they come in different thickness and coarseness?

Usually only one size dia, and used to be coarse or fine, but only appears to be one grade these days.

 

 

How about this?

Yep, that'll work.

You won't need the adaptors with those.

:)


Steve King


#28 slotbaker

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Posted 13 October 2018 - 09:32 PM

I've often thought that something like this fitted with a Rod Saw in it would be handy.

:huh:


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#29 nzoomed

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Posted 13 October 2018 - 10:23 PM

They look like what I want, doesnt look like they will fit a coping saw though? They seem to have eyes at the end.


Shaun Belcher

#30 slotbaker

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Posted 13 October 2018 - 10:28 PM

.... They seem to have eyes at the end.

Yes, too fit a std hacksaw frame...


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#31 Martin

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Posted 14 October 2018 - 12:40 AM

While you guys are on the subject of cutting. This kind of bench tool is a must I have found. I have the black cast one with a V cut out of the wood. It supports the work and puts all the cutting directly and accurately where you want it.

http://saigonmias.co...2--pmc-supplies


Martin Windmill

#32 slotbaker

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Posted 14 October 2018 - 04:41 AM

Yep, I 'C' clamp a piece of 10mm (3/8") plywood sheet to my bench to do the same thing.

It does make things easier.


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#33 nzoomed

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Posted 15 October 2018 - 12:34 AM

Yes, too fit a std hacksaw frame...

OK sweet :)


Shaun Belcher

#34 Half Fast

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Posted 15 October 2018 - 04:09 PM

 

The IRRA rule on chassis parts is as follows:

 

2b. Chassis parts, such as pans, brackets, guide
tongues, etc., that are made using EDM, laser,
or water-cutting techniques are allowed only if
they are individual commercially-available
components or components of chassis kits (i.e.
these techniques may not be used in the private
manufacture of one-off components that are not
commercially availab
le).

 

Cheers

 

I would like to know how that rule could be enforced. If you showed up with a new part (i.e.: pan) that was laser cut, how could they prove that you didn't just cut it by hand very accurately?  ^_^

 

 

Good question!


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The most dangerous form of ignorance is not knowing that you don't know anything!

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#35 Ramcatlarry

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Posted 15 October 2018 - 10:21 PM

To expand on Dave Crevies's posts,   "Maker Space" is a type of training center that is popping up in many community libraries as well as commercial locations.  The Aurora (Illinois) Public Library has a room for some projects and where I live  in nearby St Charles, we have a 2nd floor storefront Maker Space that has 'Free days' every week.  It might be a franchisable thing - not sure.  Some of the members offer classes at the Public Library in software applications.  Goggle it, you might be surprised where one is.  Any metal cutting application might not be readily available in one, but the basic skill set might start there with 3D printing.  Many regional machine shops have the metal cutting tools if you have the drawing or program.

 

I had a bandsaw that I had no space for in my retirement apartment, so now it is available for use at the Maker Space.

 

When I was at Ft Bragg in the 1960's, the base had dedicated tool clubs/craft shops around the base.  The wood working shop was in the basement of our barracks and I spent a lot of time in the 'Auto Craft Shop' down the block working on my MG and other cars.


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#36 Dave Crevie

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Posted 16 October 2018 - 11:06 AM

Maker Space is a nationally supported org. that helps libraries set up STEM based educational programs. It essentially

helps libraries set up labs to educate school children on tech programs. If it is set up in a public library, it has to be open

to all residents, due to it being funded through property and other taxes. 

 

If you really want to get into CNC, the best route is to go through your local community college. They have all the equipment

you need to do any job, big or small. Although personally, if it is a small project like parts for a slot car chassis or a 3-D

printing job, I would probably go to the Elmhurst P.L. I know an instructor there. I worked with him in the industry, and he

really knows his stuff.     



#37 Richard G With

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Posted 19 October 2018 - 11:59 AM

After looking at the rod saws, I concluded the big hacksaw eyes would be too big for the kind of stuff I want to do.

But this coping saw set may be a better tool. The mini miter block has already been useful.
8 bucks all together at Menards.

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We must all do what we must do, for if we do not, then what we must do does not get done.  Chung Mee

      Parkes, W. (Producer) & Meyer, N. (Director). (1985). Volunteers.[Motion picture]. United States: HBO.

 


#38 LindsayB

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Posted 22 October 2018 - 03:17 PM

I have been building chassis for over 40 years now and have only ever used a dremel tool - whether the chassis is a spring steel wing car or a retro with Piano wire and brass the construction method has pretty much been the same. If I want to cut a straight line either a hacksaw blade or a small steel ruler is used as a guide. 

 

Cutting spring steel requires you to be a lot more accurate because trying to file it down is 50 times harder. 


Lindsay Byron

#39 Dave Crevie

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Posted 23 October 2018 - 11:19 AM

With the technology available to everyone today, does it make sense to cut a chassis by hand? It can be done quicker,

easier and better with CAD and CNC controls. Having said that, for the old chassis I had back in the middle "60s, I am

restoring, or recreating them, using the same methods I used back then. It is only proper.  







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