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How to build slot car tracks


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#76 MattD

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Posted 11 July 2019 - 04:01 PM

Steve was a big help to me when I built my track last year.    I think he's built 1 or 2 tracks!   

 

Modifications  I did, and should have done on the originaI build.

 

I  cut  the inside wall off as you exit the banked turn on my track and built a gutter.   Too often guys crashed in the bank and always slid down in the way of the bottom lane.    

 

I replaced the flat  end of my track with 5 inch lane centers instead of 4.   That made it much easier to get thru without somebody   getting nerfed every lap.

 

I would build the whole track  with 5 inch centers if I did it again.   

 

On the flat end I would incorporate a drop off/outside gutter, also.   That track would pretty much self cleaning.

 

I think to have a fun basement or garage track, the length needs to be 30-32 foot and width 8 foot.    You can build a reasonably fun track in that space and run fast and crash too often!!


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Matt Bishop

Vintage Cox Slot Cars




#77 MSwiss

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Posted 11 July 2019 - 04:28 PM

I  cut  the inside wall off as you exit the banked turn on my track and built a gutter.   Too often guys crashed in the bank and always slid down in the way of the bottom lane.   

I never put one on, on the last part of my main straight, and the whole Bank, for that same reason.

 

Get the deslotted car out of the way of the racers, who can keep their car in the slot.

 

Tall and thick, permanently attached, opaque walls, only serve 3 purposes, IMO.

 

1) Hamper the racers vision.

 

2) Bending the cars.

 

3) Make the dissembled track easier for the guy who buys it from you, to move.


Mike Swiss
IRRA® Components Committee Chairman
Five-time USRA National Champion (two G7, one G27, two G7 Senior)
Two-time G7 World Champion (1988, 1990), eight G7 main appearances
Eight-time G7 King track single lap world record holder

17B West Ogden Ave Westmont, IL 60559, (708) 203-8003, mikeswiss86@hotmail.com (also my PayPal address)

Note: Send all USPS packages and mail to: 5858 Chase Ave., Downers Grove, IL 60516


#78 Steve Ogilvie

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Posted 11 July 2019 - 09:50 PM

Not the only way to build a track of course but for us having solid permanantly mounted sidewalls allowed quick dissasembly and set up at the customers. We built 3 tracks for a fellow in Mexico City in the late 80's and I shipped those flat and flew down and put the sidewalls on in the owner's huge bottom floor garage. I only did that because I could not wrap my head around crating up 3 finished tracks.  



#79 MattD

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Posted 12 July 2019 - 08:28 AM

In my opinion, the sidewalls do help the track to keep the surface shape and not let the MDF  change it's shape as it "settles".    I have found you can still change the the surface a bit by jacking and putting pressure on the underside and weight on the top side.     Having sidewalls will help retain the rigidness.    The "H" shape is much harder to bend.    If the wall does not extend above the roadbed, but only from the surface down, it probably serves the same purpose as a full wall in making the track rigid


Matt Bishop

Vintage Cox Slot Cars

#80 MSwiss

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Posted 15 July 2019 - 09:03 AM

Not the only way to build a track of course but for us having solid permanantly mounted sidewalls allowed quick dissasembly and set up at the customers. We built 3 tracks for a fellow in Mexico City in the late 80's and I shipped those flat and flew down and put the sidewalls on in the owner's huge bottom floor garage. I only did that because I could not wrap my head around crating up 3 finished tracks.

Yes, it's amazing how fast guys like you and Hasse would get tracks up.

With having the luxury of only moving 20 and 10 minutes away, in my 2 relocations, I'm glad I never permanently attached the walls.

Not having them on, made adjusting the track much easier.

I worked on the Koford King, extensively, when Scott Wright bought it.

All I could really do, with it, is adjust the elevation.

With mine, after the first move, I was able to get at a less than ideal transition between the Deadman and Finger, on Purple.

It was never an issue with wing cars, but became a bit of one when we started racing lowdown force, Retro F1 cars.

I cut one leg an inch or so shorter, as I was out of adjustment slotting, and the inside dropped/twisted right to where he should be.

It's been perfect since.

On my 2nd move, I changed the footprint of the track by opening up the Bank, reducing the banking slightly, (where it had more than was needed) which in turn tightened up the Deadman and Finger, which increased the banking in those 2 turns.

Back to ease of moving, after moving a fair amount of tracks, I always wondered why the track builders didn't route a few slots, in the walls, below the track surface, for hand grips.

It seems like it would make grabbing the track much easier.

  

In my opinion, the sidewalls do help the track to keep the surface shape and not let the MDF  change it's shape as it "settles".    I have found you can still change the the surface a bit by jacking and putting pressure on the underside and weight on the top side.     Having sidewalls will help retain the rigidness.    The "H" shape is much harder to bend.    If the wall does not extend above the roadbed, but only from the surface down, it probably serves the same purpose as a full wall in making the track rigid

No doubt adding solidly attached walls makes the track stronger.

If it is to be used as a part time shelf, it definitely would be a help.

Especially, like in the case of Mark Mattei, where he had dozens of unassembled bikes, in boxes, stacked on his Imperial Red, during the warm weather months.

But other than that, I think it's a negative.

Along with the ease of adjustment, I already alluded to in this post, I think not having the walls permanently attached, allows the track to "breathe".

Since Retro got started, in about 2005 or 2006, it seems like just about every King has launched F1 cars, at one time or another.

Mine, in the 12 years, we have run Retro, has never had any launching issues, with low downforce F1 cars, and even with the less aerodynamic, Hardbodies, we've been racing for the last 6 years, or so.

Of course, maybe I just got lucky, and have sort of magical MDF.

Mike Swiss
IRRA® Components Committee Chairman
Five-time USRA National Champion (two G7, one G27, two G7 Senior)
Two-time G7 World Champion (1988, 1990), eight G7 main appearances
Eight-time G7 King track single lap world record holder

17B West Ogden Ave Westmont, IL 60559, (708) 203-8003, mikeswiss86@hotmail.com (also my PayPal address)

Note: Send all USPS packages and mail to: 5858 Chase Ave., Downers Grove, IL 60516


#81 Steve Ogilvie

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Posted 15 July 2019 - 05:41 PM

One mistake I have seen people make when setting up an old king is they just do not get pieces in the right place, mainly the deadman. Everybody thinks a track with solid walls inside and out does not flex but that is just not true. Most people will bolt together the main straight, bank,  back straight and deadman and carry on and try to put the bridge or the leadon on last. If the deadman is not in the right spot related to the main straight everything will still fit together but it won't fit together the way it was supposed to.

  The last piece of a king track to be put in should always be the finger bank. You push and pull the rest of the track until you can see the deadman will just fall in and then everything will be in the right place.

   For a long time I sold tracks unpainted, painted, RTR, whatever people wanted. But the only track you can make a decent amount of money on is a ready to run track. So from about 1998 or so all we sold were modular RTR tracks. The strategy worked and we could make a good buck and we sold a lot less tracks but were making much better income. 







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